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Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
763 Views

Where are NIOS Files for Cyclone IV GX Transceiver Starter Kit

I'm playing around with the Cyclone IV GX Transceiver Starter Kit and would like to try rebuilding some of the demonstrations. There appears to be instructions on how to rebuild the FPGA/QSYS/SOPC files, but I haven't found the source code or build files for the embedded NIOS-II demo software. 

 

  • Is this code buried in some directory that I'm missing? 

  • If not, is it available, and where can I download it? 

 

 

[btw: In particular, I'd like to rebuild the webserver demo] 

 

Thanks.
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5 Replies
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
33 Views

isn't this it? 

 

cycloneIVGX_4cgx15_start\examples\board_update_portal
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
33 Views

interesting how it puts a space in my path

Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
33 Views

Yes, that it the right place! Funny how things can be right in front of your nose and you can still miss them. 

 

Looks like the networking protocol is done by the uCos/II stack which may mean that they don't provide all the files needed to build the program. Great! Now at least I can try to build it from scratch, which is a great way to learn and debug the tool chain on my PC. 

 

In any event, if the demo uses the uCos/II stack, I'm pretty sure that I'd need to buy the rights to the stack to do anything commercial with the codeset. 

 

Thanks for your help
Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
33 Views

i think you're right about needing a commercial license for uCos, but i am fairly certain i rebuilt the demo after i found a bug in it

Altera_Forum
Honored Contributor I
33 Views

The uC/OS-II and uC/OS-III kernels are free for personal and academic use. You only need to license the software when deploying it in commercial applications. 

 

Most of the Altera uC/OS-II TCP/IP examples use the Interniche TCP/IP stack. 

 

Micrium have TCP/IP and USB stacks, but I'm not sure if they have the same licensing policy as the kernels. 

 

Cheers, 

Dave