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What is an FPGA anyway?

What is an FPGA anyway?

Functional Processor for Gigahertz Applications Fully Programmable Gate Array For PC Gated Applications Field Programmable Gate Array Featured Program Guided Algorithm


If you said Field Programmable Gate Array, you're right! FPGAs can be modified in the field and power smart energy grids, aircraft navigation, automotive driver’s assistance, medical ultrasounds and data center search engines – just to name a few.

FPGAs provide:

Flexibility: FPGAs decrease risk and design time relative to other types of semiconductors. FPGAs configure upon every power up so when a designer wants to make a change they can simply download a new configuration into the device and try out the change. Competing devices such as ASICs have fixed functionality that can’t be changed without great cost and time. Time-to-Market: Since you can change the programming of an FPGA right up until production starts – or even afterwards – FPGAs give you the ability to ship as soon as your design is working and tested. Designs based on an ASSP or ASIC requiring hardware changes take much longer to get to market. Integration: As the features of FPGAs have grown over the years, more functionality can be integrated into fewer devices, sometimes even a single chip. Often, changes can be made to the FPGA without making costly PC board changes. Fewer devices on the circuit board also increase reliability, resulting in fewer failures. Cost: While ASICs may cost less per unit than an equivalent FPGA, building them requires a non-recurring expense (NRE), a one-time fee that can run upwards of millions of dollars.


After downloading the ebook, Get Started with one of these two great starter dev kits that will give you hands experience about how to program an FPGA.


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‎06-27-2019 01:02 AM
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