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YZani
Beginner
1,924 Views

Intel HD 610 Graphics Driver black screen while installing driver

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I v found many people with this problem but none of them had a fix to mine

a week ago my computer was workin fine with intel's HD graphics card driverbut then I had an isue with windows so I had to format the HDD and run a new installation of windows 10..

this is when this problem popped up, I installed windows Pro x64 1803, all others drivers were installed perfectly but when I try to install the integrated graphics card driver .. half way the screen goes black, so I found my self hard rebooting the sytem

and when I do the graphics card is not installed, this is the fixes I tired:

1 - Updated my MSI B250M Pro-VD MoBo BIOS

2 - Enabled UEFI boot

3 - ofcourse tried different versions of the driver including the one that came with MoBo CD

4 - tried to install the driver while the screen was plugged off ( thought it might be the monitor)

and some other minor things..

My computer:

MSI B250M Pro-VD, Pentium G4560 3.5GH, 4GB DRR4 TeamGroup 2400Mhz, 400W Havit PSU and an old WD 320 GB HDD

(Edit) My PSU havea 4-pin-connecter for the CPU but the MoBo support up to 8 pins

Can Some one Help me Please, and Thank you

PS: I hope its not a hardware problem cuz I cant afford another CPU

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1 Solution
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
391 Views

First of all, some side comments:

  1. With the CPU that you have, a PSU with your maximum wattage and with only a 4-pin CPU connector is ok. But, note the following:
    1. In the short term, I recommend that you install a 4-pin-to-8-pin adapter (like this one: https://www.amazon.fr/Akasa-AK-CBPW10-15BK-adaptateur-alimentation-broches/dp/B0051Y0B0Y Akasa AK-CBPW10-15BK Câble adaptateur alimentation ATX 4 broches vers 8 broches: Amazon.fr) so that the 12V power is more-evenly spread across the CPU socket power pins.
    2. In the long term, if/when you decide to upgrade your processor, I recommend that you upgrade to an ATX12V-compliant (or EPS12V-compliant) PSU that supports an 8-pin (or 4+4-pin) CPU power connector.
  2. When you enabled UEFI boot, did you then remember to delete ALL of the partitions on your HDD during the Windows installation? Only by deleting ALL partitions will it install the GPT partition table that you need for full and proper UEFI boot. If not, you may not actually be booting in UEFI mode. Check if this is the case. Unfortunately, if you are, the only thing you can do is start over and reinstall Windows.

Now, to your issue. I always recommend that you start by downloading and installing the current versions of all drivers that are provided by your board manufacturer's (MSI, in this case) web site. The versions of the drivers on the CD/DVD provided with your motherboard are usually so out of date as to be useless. I thus do not recommend that you use this CD at all. As a starting point, I suggest that you to the following:

  1. With this or another PC, download the latest available version of the Intel HD Graphics driver package from MSI's site and store it onto a USB flash disk.
  2. Disconnect your PC from the Internet completely and keep it disconnected until told to reconnect it later in these instructions.
  3. Boot your PC in Safe Mode.
  4. Uninstall any existing version version of the Intel HD Graphics driver that you (or Windows Update) previously installed. Reboot if the uninstall step asks you to - but remember to boot back up in Safe Mode.
  5. Repeat step 4 until all Intel versions of the driver are uninstalled and the system is using the Microsoft generic graphics driver (use Device Manager to determine what is running).
  6. Install the version of the driver that you downloaded earlier. Reboot if the uninstall step asks you to.
  7. If everything is running ok at this point, reboot in normal mode (i.e. get out of Safe Mode).
  8. Reconnect your PC to the internet and then click on Start, then Settings, then Update & Security and then Check for Updates. Install any updates available. Reboot when the tool tells you to.
  9. Repeat step 8 until if finally says that there are not more updates.
  10. You're done at this point - but do the next step for me:
  11. (Again using Device Manager) Check what version of the Intel HD Graphics driver is installed and let me know.

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post

3 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
392 Views

First of all, some side comments:

  1. With the CPU that you have, a PSU with your maximum wattage and with only a 4-pin CPU connector is ok. But, note the following:
    1. In the short term, I recommend that you install a 4-pin-to-8-pin adapter (like this one: https://www.amazon.fr/Akasa-AK-CBPW10-15BK-adaptateur-alimentation-broches/dp/B0051Y0B0Y Akasa AK-CBPW10-15BK Câble adaptateur alimentation ATX 4 broches vers 8 broches: Amazon.fr) so that the 12V power is more-evenly spread across the CPU socket power pins.
    2. In the long term, if/when you decide to upgrade your processor, I recommend that you upgrade to an ATX12V-compliant (or EPS12V-compliant) PSU that supports an 8-pin (or 4+4-pin) CPU power connector.
  2. When you enabled UEFI boot, did you then remember to delete ALL of the partitions on your HDD during the Windows installation? Only by deleting ALL partitions will it install the GPT partition table that you need for full and proper UEFI boot. If not, you may not actually be booting in UEFI mode. Check if this is the case. Unfortunately, if you are, the only thing you can do is start over and reinstall Windows.

Now, to your issue. I always recommend that you start by downloading and installing the current versions of all drivers that are provided by your board manufacturer's (MSI, in this case) web site. The versions of the drivers on the CD/DVD provided with your motherboard are usually so out of date as to be useless. I thus do not recommend that you use this CD at all. As a starting point, I suggest that you to the following:

  1. With this or another PC, download the latest available version of the Intel HD Graphics driver package from MSI's site and store it onto a USB flash disk.
  2. Disconnect your PC from the Internet completely and keep it disconnected until told to reconnect it later in these instructions.
  3. Boot your PC in Safe Mode.
  4. Uninstall any existing version version of the Intel HD Graphics driver that you (or Windows Update) previously installed. Reboot if the uninstall step asks you to - but remember to boot back up in Safe Mode.
  5. Repeat step 4 until all Intel versions of the driver are uninstalled and the system is using the Microsoft generic graphics driver (use Device Manager to determine what is running).
  6. Install the version of the driver that you downloaded earlier. Reboot if the uninstall step asks you to.
  7. If everything is running ok at this point, reboot in normal mode (i.e. get out of Safe Mode).
  8. Reconnect your PC to the internet and then click on Start, then Settings, then Update & Security and then Check for Updates. Install any updates available. Reboot when the tool tells you to.
  9. Repeat step 8 until if finally says that there are not more updates.
  10. You're done at this point - but do the next step for me:
  11. (Again using Device Manager) Check what version of the Intel HD Graphics driver is installed and let me know.

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post

YZani
Beginner
391 Views

Thank you N.Scott.Pearson for your help, I think it might be the partition because when I was installing windows I got a screen were I was asked to choose between to installation of windows 10, So I might even change my HDD to an SSD or at least a new one since my current HDD belongs to my old PC, other than that I ll keep all your recommendation and guidings under consideration incase it is not the partition thats causing the problem...

And Thank you again for your time and effort ^^

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
391 Views

Yea, if you don't delete all of the existing partitions, it is going to keep whatever partition table you had previously (which, on a used HDD like this, is likely a legacy MBR partition table). To say it more completely than I did previously, you need to delete all partitions on the drive and then tell Windows to install to the unused/unpartitioned space (which now should encompass the entire drive). This ensures that, if you booted the installation media in UEFI mode, it will create a GPT partition table and fully support UEFI boot. It will also let Windows intelligently choose how to set up the various (system and recovery) partitions on this drive.

There are three major changes you could make that will improve your system's performance:

  1. Increasing the amount of memory from 4GB to 8GB will make a significant difference. I would recommend getting a second DIMM identical to your existing DIMM.
  2. Adding a SSD - even a small (128GB) one - and installing Windows 10 onto this SSD will improve storage throughput significantly (if you go for a small (128GB) SSD, I recommend that you keep the HDD in the system for the storage of your (less-often accessed) data files. Based upon the capabilities of your motherboard, you have three options for how you can accomplish this. They are presented here in increasing performance order (and, unfortunately, increasing cost order):
    1. Add a 2,5in SATA III SSD.
    2. Add a M.2 SATA III SSD. Note: Items # 1 and # 2 actually provide the same level of performance. I (still) recommend Item # 2 over Item # 1, simply because it more-cleanly mounts directly onto the motherboard and does not require (separate) SATA Power and Data cables.
    3. Add a M.2 NVMe SSD. These have 3x-4x the performance of SATA III SSDs
  3. Upgrade to an Intel Core processor (your board supports 6th and 7th generation Intel Core i3, Core i5 and Core i7 processors).

Hope this helps,

...S

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