Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
idata
Community Manager
1,920 Views

Please help me understand "Color accuracy" setting on my Dell XPS 9570

Hello

What I have

I've recently got a Dell XPS 9570 laptop. It is equipped with a great UHD display that supposedly covers 100% AdobeRGB color space (among others). I'm using the most recent official build of Windows 10. I also use Adobe Lightroom Classic CC for amateur photography editing.

The laptop came with Dell Premier Color software for controlling your display that allows you to switch color gamut modes, white point, etc. It also seems to install some factory calibration ICC profiles behind the scenes for various setting combinations. If you have a hardware X-Rite i1Display Pro calibrator connected, it can put that to use as well.

It also uses Intel UHD Graphics Control Center that offers the "Color accuracy" on/off option. From my quick research and posts by Ronald_Intel on this forum I learned it is related to the xvYCC color space.

What I can see

Flipping the "Color accuracy" switch has an immediate and very noticeable effect on how seemingly everything gets displayed by the OS. With "Color accuracy" on, the color gamut seems to narrow down significantly, especially in the reds region. My photos viewed in Lightroom look different and, I strongly assume (as I don't have a calibrator yet), the color patches displayed by the monitor calibration software for the calibrator hardware to measure would, most certainly, indeed look different, too. I imagine only one particular setting of the "Color accuracy" switch makes the factory ICC profiles accurate, throwing the calibration completely out whack in the other.

What I want

I'd like to take the full advantage of that sweet 100% AdobeRGB panel I got with my Dell XPS for my Adobe Lightroom photo editing needs. I'd like my ICC profiles: both the factory-provided and the ones I'll make myself in the future (after I'll get that calibrator) to work as accurately as possible. I don't want my video driver/software/features interfering with my laptop screen's ability to display the AdobeRGB space as fully and as accurately as possible.

What I struggle to understand

I'm not really sure what the "Color accuracy" switch does. I can see the colors get more toned-down and subdued (you could argue it's, indeed, more accurate) once I enable it but I'd like to know what kind of conversion/mapping actually happens in the background. The little I know about it makes me think that merely displaying a simple 100% red, 0% green, 0% blue sample in an RGB space in Paint, Photoshop or any other non-video application will produce noticeably "less red" output that the display is capable of and what is possible with "Color accuracy" off. How does is all work in relation to AdobeRGB? Is the xvYCC indeed so much wider even than AdobeRGB? Or does "Color accuracy" make everything duller than needed only for the compatible xvYCC video content to "wow" and "pop"? My layman's understanding of wide gamut and more color bit-depth was not so much to "narrow down" the existing content as to make the tonal gradations more smooth and subtle, eliminate banding, etc. To sum it up: which "Color accuracy" setting should I use for Lightroom, print proofing/color matching and calibrating the display for my photo editing needs?

0 Kudos
2 Replies
idata
Community Manager
150 Views

Hello Zbig

Thank you for joining the Intel® community.

Let me investigate the case for you, I will be posting back when news becomes available.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Leonardo C.

Intel Customer Support Technician

Under Contract to Intel Corporation

idata
Community Manager
150 Views

Hello Zbig

 

 

Thank you for waiting, please bear in mind that it's important to mention that the color accuracy depends on the type of monitor and the program or application that you want to use. There is not a "unique value that fits all" configurations/integrations.

 

 

To calibrate your printers and monitors you will need to contact their manufacturers or make some test by yourself until reaching the correct settings for you.

 

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

Regards,

 

Leonardo C.

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

 

Under Contract to Intel Corporation

 

Reply