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About options to optimize version 11

aazue
New Contributor I
195 Views

Hi to all
I haven not understand some options to optimize
In new Version 11 -axSSE .. replaced by -xSSE..... ?
If I use xHost resulting included automatically -xSSE.. (auto detected)
-O2 -O3 are several defaults options grouped
To use icc or icpc are same ??
Thank
Best regards

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1 Solution
TimP
Black Belt
195 Views

icc and icpc have mostly the same options, evidently excepting -std=c99. If you're asking whether there is an option equivalent to icc 10.1 -axK, that option may still work, but is deprecated, so aapparently doesn't have a replacement. For a generic option which works on all SSE2 CPUs, you probably want -mSSE2 (equivalent to -xW). -axSSE2 presumably runs x87 code on all non-Intel CPUs, as well as all CPUs not supporting SSE2.

The distinction between -O2 and -O3 hasn't changed much from 10.1 to 11.0. It's still not the same as in gcc.

The description given by icc -help doesn't entirely match the powerpoint slides which have been distributed.

-xhost would choose the most restrictive architecture option suitable for the CPU where the compiler is running, e.g. -xSSE4.1 on Penryn.

I prefer to add some basic options in icc.cfg and icpc.cfg, e.g. -ansi_alias -prec-div -prec-sqrt (and, for icc, -std=c99).

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2 Replies
TimP
Black Belt
196 Views

icc and icpc have mostly the same options, evidently excepting -std=c99. If you're asking whether there is an option equivalent to icc 10.1 -axK, that option may still work, but is deprecated, so aapparently doesn't have a replacement. For a generic option which works on all SSE2 CPUs, you probably want -mSSE2 (equivalent to -xW). -axSSE2 presumably runs x87 code on all non-Intel CPUs, as well as all CPUs not supporting SSE2.

The distinction between -O2 and -O3 hasn't changed much from 10.1 to 11.0. It's still not the same as in gcc.

The description given by icc -help doesn't entirely match the powerpoint slides which have been distributed.

-xhost would choose the most restrictive architecture option suitable for the CPU where the compiler is running, e.g. -xSSE4.1 on Penryn.

I prefer to add some basic options in icc.cfg and icpc.cfg, e.g. -ansi_alias -prec-div -prec-sqrt (and, for icc, -std=c99).

aazue
New Contributor I
195 Views
Quoting - tim18

icc and icpc have mostly the same options, evidently excepting -std=c99. If you're asking whether there is an option equivalent to icc 10.1 -axK, that option may still work, but is deprecated, so aapparently doesn't have a replacement. For a generic option which works on all SSE2 CPUs, you probably want -mSSE2 (equivalent to -xW). -axSSE2 presumably runs x87 code on all non-Intel CPUs, as well as all CPUs not supporting SSE2.

The distinction between -O2 and -O3 hasn't changed much from 10.1 to 11.0. It's still not the same as in gcc.

The description given by icc -help doesn't entirely match the powerpoint slides which have been distributed.

-xhost would choose the most restrictive architecture option suitable for the CPU where the compiler is running, e.g. -xSSE4.1 on Penryn.

I prefer to add some basic options in icc.cfg and icpc.cfg, e.g. -ansi_alias -prec-div -prec-sqrt (and, for icc, -std=c99).

Thank for your answer that having result clarify my doubts and sorry for deranged
Best regards

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