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piet_de_weer
Beginner
97 Views

License question: Windows, Linux AND Mac?

After using the Intel compiler at work for quite a while, I now need a license for myself. I've quit my job to start my own company, so you can imagine that I'm on a tight budget.

I'm making software - only C++ code - that I want to compile for:
- Windows 32/64
- Linux 32/64
- Mac (no idea yet what people are using there - new to me)
I will also use IPP, some 6.x version.

Based on performance tests that I did some time ago, I need a relatively old version of the C++ compiler - 10.1. Anything that I've tested since that (11.0, 11.1) produces code that's about 25% slower - on my project. For one small library that I need to occasionally build for someone else I need version 11.1 due to compatibility reasons - that's only on Windows, and only for 32 bit.

Based on what I found so far, it looks like I need the Intel C++ compiler (approx. 450 euro) and IPP (approx. 150 euro) license.

My questions:
1. Are the 10.1 versions for all these systems still available for download?
2. Do I need separate licenses for 32 and 64 bit?
3. Do I need separate licenses for version 10.1 and 11.1 on Windows (32 bit)?
4. Do I need separate licenses for the different OS's?

Finally, since 10.1 is a pretty old version, is there a discount for this? I found some sites that are selling cheap 8.x/9.0 licenses, couldn't find any 10.1 licenses though.

If I only need a single license for this (well, 2, compiler and IPP) it's fine, otherwise if there's no discount I cannot justify buying Linux and MAC licenses until I get a decent customer base on those OS's, and I'll have to switch to gcc instead - which generates noticably slower executables.
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11 Replies
TimP
Black Belt
97 Views

The current license for Intel C++ includes IPP, 32 and 64 bit, and older versions available for download (going back beyond 10.1). You may want a current IPP in order to have automatic support for Core I7-2. The windows, linux, and mac versions require separate licenses.
In my experience, most performance losses in 12.x may be overcome by switching to CEAN and Cilk+ reducer notation, although I wouldn't advise CEAN where you don't need it.
Thresholds for inter-procedural optimizations varied from one version to the next, and may be controlled by command line options. They shouldn't be as critical when you use /Qansi-alias and restrict pointers.
Specific cases of reduced performance in 12.1 relative to previous versions are fair game for reports with reproducers on premier.intel.com or on this forum.
piet_de_weer
Beginner
97 Views

Thanks Tim! I'll go for only a Windows license for now then, and will use gcc for Linux and probably for MAC as well, at least for now.

The performance difference occurs even on a single-core system, whatever changed seems to affect the numer of instructions or memory accesses itself, not parallelization (which I do manually for now). So Cilk++ should not make any difference (of course using it could lead to improvements). I'm already using a lot of SSE2-code, CEAN looks very useful especially now I'll also start buiding 64-bit versions.

I'm already using /Qansi-alias etc. If I ever find where the difference in performance occurs I'll report it - but so far I only know that the total result of my entire code base (2.5 MB) is slower in 11.x/12.x.

When I have my license I'll run some tests with the latest compiler version - it would be great to be able to take advantage of performance improvements in newer versions instead of having to stick with the old version I'm using now. Especially after reading about Cilk++ and CEAN...
piet_de_weer
Beginner
97 Views

Hm, I bought Intel Parallel Composer which includes the C++ compiler and IPP, and now I'm trying to download an older version. But the selection doesn't go back further than the initial release - I can see the option to download C++ compiler version 10.1 but that seems to be based on an old trial license that I used in 2009, and it requires me to upgrade the license first.

When am I doing wrong? Did I order the wrong license??
TimP
Black Belt
97 Views

Did you register the new license? You can do so before entering the download part of the registrationcenter site, if you didn't do so at the end of the install sequence.
piet_de_weer
Beginner
97 Views

Yes I did - and when I check https://registrationcenter.intel.com/regcenter/myproducts.aspx I see a registration that's valid until Jan 10 2013. So that should be ok.

I basically get to this point:
4. Choose the component of interest or click on theDownload fileslink. You will be presented with a drop down list of release versions for the selected product.

On that page I see this text:
Select other packages from the dropdown menu:

I cannot choose a release (it's set to 2011, no drop down box), I can select un update though (Update 8 downto Initial release).

But I don't want the Composer 2011 version, I want C++ Compiler 10.1...



Edit: O, I think I see what's wrong now.

If I select my new license the title is: Intel Parallel Composer.
But if I look into the old license it says: Intel C++ Composer XE for Windows* (formerly known as Intel C++ Compiler Professional Edition for Windows).

So does this mean that I bought the wrong license? I only need the C++ compiler and IPP, which are also included in the (cheaper) Parallel Composer....

JLuna5
New Contributor I
97 Views

Hi, what type of license you require for you software? with this document you can guide for you have more precision.....
Hi, what type of license you require for you software? with this document you can guide for you have more precision.....
http://www.informatica.us.es/~ramon/articulos/LicenciasSoftware.pdf
Hubert_H_Intel
Employee
97 Views

Thanks for your request. Could you please specify what exactly you want to know? I cannot understand the .pdf youpointed to.
Regards, Hubert.
mecej4
Black Belt
97 Views

The link given by judlup in #9 points to an article in Spanish and about a topic that has little bearing on the questions that piet_de_weer asked in English.
JLuna5
New Contributor I
97 Views

hi, in the text i'm pointing the different types of licenses that exist with which Piet de weer
Scott__William
Beginner
97 Views

My developer team is in need of an older IPP license, (aprox years old). When trying to install on our compile machines we are getting a prompt to for either this license, or an equipment s/n. How can we obtain this license that has certainly been purchased from you in the past?  

Viet_H_Intel
Moderator
97 Views

Will you able to open a ticket at http://www.intel.com/supporttickets

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