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JDopo
Beginner
514 Views

Can a DZ68BC be updated for Windows 10 or do I need to roll back to Windows 7?

I have seen sites for driver downloads for this board and Windows 10. Is this accurate or is it only Windows 7 compatible? Again its DZ68BC. Thank You.

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4 Replies
AlHill
Super User
100 Views

Windows 10 is not supported on your board. Any drivers for your board are found here:

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/56461/intel-desktop-board-dz68bc.html

 

Do not use 3rd party driver download sites.

 

Any drivers needed by Windows 10 are in the W10 install and you "should" not have any issues

 

Doc

 

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
100 Views

Adding to Al's comments: If using internal graphics, performance will be somewhat curtailed by Microsoft compatibility driver. Best bet is AMD or NVIDIA graphics card (and yes, I realize you are going to have to play off compatibility versus driver support offered by vendor).

...S

BPalm9
Beginner
100 Views

Were you ever able to resolve this issue? I have the same DZ68BC MB and can not successfully load W10 from current running W7. I am very disappointed in Intel with there standing in computer technologies.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
100 Views

Before Windows 10 was released, Intel was very open regarding their decision to not actively support Windows 10 with the graphics engines in 2nd generation Core and equivalent and earlier processor generations and chipsets. While Microsoft provided a compatibility driver that would allow these graphics engines to be used, this compatibility driver (IMHO) barely did the job. Its performance could be poor and its OpenGL support was out-of-date and did not support more modern games and graphics applications. For people that are not doing these kinds of activities, the Microsoft compatibility driver is good enough. For people who want to do these kinds of activities, they will need to add a better graphics solution. I would argue that they really need to be doing this regardless; the performance of Intel's graphics engines in these older processors and chipsets was not sufficient for these activities anyway.

 

Now, what is the issue that you were expecting to be resolved? There are two issues, (1) this lack of support for the older graphics engines and (2) compatibility issues of modern graphics cards in these older systems. The first issue is discussed separately above. If you want to continue to use these older processors and chipsets with Windows 10 and you have any graphics-intensive needs, you will simply have to use an add-in graphics solution. The second issue is one that is not going to be resolved. Some graphics cards are compatible and some are not. Understanding the issues, I personally blame the graphics card manufacturers; they have simply stopped supporting these older environments, doing things like stripping Legacy support out of their Video BIOS (the drivers provided in an OpROM on the card), etc.

 

As I have detailed in many of these discussions, I have a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti card in my DZ68ZV system (DZ68ZV is cost-reduced version of DZ68BC) and it works just fine. It has plenty of graphics capability and will handle many modern games and graphics feature-intensive applications just fine. Now, I cannot guarantee that the third-party implementations of this card (from MSI, Gigabyte, EVGA, etc.) will be as-compatible and I cannot guarantee that newer generations of these graphics cards will be as-compatible; I simply do not have them to perform this kind of investigation.

 

...S

 

 

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