Intel® Desktop Boards
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DH67CL

HeyJake
Beginner
477 Views

Hi

 

I know DH67CL is no longer supported, but I have a couple of questions.

 

Let me start by stating...I upgraded the machine to Windows 10 from windows 7, which failed. I then installed Windows 10 from scratch. The machine started rebooting randomly. I checked for drivers, but before I could install drivers, software, windows updates the machine reboots.

I decided to upgrade the BIOS, but due to the system not being supported any more I was only able to get BL0163. I followed the steps 100% and it displayed the BIOS was upgraded successfully. Since then the screen is completely blank/black. I can hear the machine start and see all the LEDs etc but no screen. I was then able to find BIOS BL0162 which I tried to install but still no screen.

I have tried the jumpers from 1-2, 2-3 and no jumpers, the USB with either of the BIOS file, but because I can't see the screen I can't know what is going on. I have remove the battery, power and jumper and tried various combinations to try recover the BIOS and/or screen.

 

Where can I get a BIOS recovery file? and a working BIOS version?

 

Note: I upgraded from BL0076 to BL0163

 

Thanks in advance

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1 Solution
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
470 Views

Did you do the original update using the BIOS Recovery process? If not, there is a high likelihood that you bricked your board in the process. That is just too big a jump in BIOS releases to do without using the BIOS Recovery process.

Your BIOS Recovery file is the BL0163.BIO file that you already have. The process you should use to attempt the BIOS Recovery is as follows:

  1. NOTE: Read these instructions completely before starting. Follow all instructions EXACTLY.
  2. On some other Windows-based PC, transfer/download the .BIO file for the BIOS release you wish to install.
  3. Insert a 32GB or smaller (the smaller the better) USB 2.0 flash drive into the PC. Avoid using USB 3.0 flash drives (most are not compatible). It is also best if you use a flash drive that has an access LED that you can watch.
  4. Format this USB flash drive using the Windows Format applet. Select to install the FAT32 file system (NOT vFAT, NOT exFAT; FAT32 only). You must also specify that the Quick Format option be Disabled (unchecked). Sorry for how long this format takes; at least you don't have to do it more than once.
  5. NOTE: If FAT32 is not offered as a choice by the Format applet, your flash drive is too big; use another.
  6. Copy the .BIO file into the root folder of this USB flash drive. This should be the only .BIO file in the root folder of the USB flash drive.
  7. Properly eject the USB flash drive. Do not just yank it out. Do this from File Explorer or using the Safely Remove Hardware and Eject Media System Tray applet.
  8. Power off the Desktop Board system.
  9. Remove the yellow BIOS Configuration jumper from the board. It will be the only yellow jumper; any others will usually be black.
  10. NOTE: Take note of the pins that this jumper was plugged onto; you will need this later for reinsertion.
  11. Plug the USB flash drive into one of the black USB 2.0 ports on the back panel of the board. Do not use blue or yellow USB 3.0 port. Do not use any front panel USB ports.
  12. Power on the system.
  13. The BIOS Recovery process should start automatically. You should see a progress report on your main monitor.
  14. NOTE: If you do not see a progress report displayed on a monitor, do not power off the system for at least 15 minutes. While it is rare, it is possible for the process to proceed without an onscreen display; you must give it ample time to complete, just in case.
  15. When the BIOS Recovery process is complete, you will be asked to power off the system. Do so.
  16. Restore the yellow BIOS Configuration jumper to the pins it was on previously. This should be across pins 1 and 2 of this (three pin) header.
  17. Remove the USB flash drive from the back panel of the board.
  18. Power on the board.
  19. Immediately begin pressing the F2 key, over and over (approx. once per second) until you see the BIOS Setup (or Visual BIOS) screen displayed.
  20. Verify, using the BIOS version string, that the BIOS installed properly. Stop if it isn't.
  21. Press the F9 key (followed by the Y key) to reset of the BIOS configuration.
  22. Press the F10 key (followed by the Y key) to save the BIOS Configuration and exit BIOS Setup.
  23. Once screen is cleared (goes black), begin pressing the F2 key, over and over, until you see the BIOS Setup screen displayed.
  24. Make any changes to the BIOS configuration that you desire (for example, disabling NUMLOCK) or that you require (for example, setting Boot Order, enabling UEFI, etc.).
  25. Press the F10 key (followed by the Y key) to save the BIOS Configuration and exit BIOS Setup.
  26. Test.

Here are some additional thoughts:

  • If BIOS Recovery will not start, try using a different USB port. You can try the USB 3.0 ports as well.
  • If switching USB ports didn't work, try using a different USB flash drive.
  • As always, best to use USB flash drive that has an access LED so you can visually see if it is accessed.
  • If you are seeing USB flash drive being accessed but BIOS Recovery does not start, a common cause is compatibility with the memory present. The BIOS Recovery engine, as it is with USB 3.0 flash drives, can be very picky with regards to memory compatibility. Try removing all but one DIMM/SODIMM.
  • For more information on the BIOS Recovery process, consult Intel Desktop Boards Recovery BIOS Update Instructions.

Hope this helps,

...S

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4 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
471 Views

Did you do the original update using the BIOS Recovery process? If not, there is a high likelihood that you bricked your board in the process. That is just too big a jump in BIOS releases to do without using the BIOS Recovery process.

Your BIOS Recovery file is the BL0163.BIO file that you already have. The process you should use to attempt the BIOS Recovery is as follows:

  1. NOTE: Read these instructions completely before starting. Follow all instructions EXACTLY.
  2. On some other Windows-based PC, transfer/download the .BIO file for the BIOS release you wish to install.
  3. Insert a 32GB or smaller (the smaller the better) USB 2.0 flash drive into the PC. Avoid using USB 3.0 flash drives (most are not compatible). It is also best if you use a flash drive that has an access LED that you can watch.
  4. Format this USB flash drive using the Windows Format applet. Select to install the FAT32 file system (NOT vFAT, NOT exFAT; FAT32 only). You must also specify that the Quick Format option be Disabled (unchecked). Sorry for how long this format takes; at least you don't have to do it more than once.
  5. NOTE: If FAT32 is not offered as a choice by the Format applet, your flash drive is too big; use another.
  6. Copy the .BIO file into the root folder of this USB flash drive. This should be the only .BIO file in the root folder of the USB flash drive.
  7. Properly eject the USB flash drive. Do not just yank it out. Do this from File Explorer or using the Safely Remove Hardware and Eject Media System Tray applet.
  8. Power off the Desktop Board system.
  9. Remove the yellow BIOS Configuration jumper from the board. It will be the only yellow jumper; any others will usually be black.
  10. NOTE: Take note of the pins that this jumper was plugged onto; you will need this later for reinsertion.
  11. Plug the USB flash drive into one of the black USB 2.0 ports on the back panel of the board. Do not use blue or yellow USB 3.0 port. Do not use any front panel USB ports.
  12. Power on the system.
  13. The BIOS Recovery process should start automatically. You should see a progress report on your main monitor.
  14. NOTE: If you do not see a progress report displayed on a monitor, do not power off the system for at least 15 minutes. While it is rare, it is possible for the process to proceed without an onscreen display; you must give it ample time to complete, just in case.
  15. When the BIOS Recovery process is complete, you will be asked to power off the system. Do so.
  16. Restore the yellow BIOS Configuration jumper to the pins it was on previously. This should be across pins 1 and 2 of this (three pin) header.
  17. Remove the USB flash drive from the back panel of the board.
  18. Power on the board.
  19. Immediately begin pressing the F2 key, over and over (approx. once per second) until you see the BIOS Setup (or Visual BIOS) screen displayed.
  20. Verify, using the BIOS version string, that the BIOS installed properly. Stop if it isn't.
  21. Press the F9 key (followed by the Y key) to reset of the BIOS configuration.
  22. Press the F10 key (followed by the Y key) to save the BIOS Configuration and exit BIOS Setup.
  23. Once screen is cleared (goes black), begin pressing the F2 key, over and over, until you see the BIOS Setup screen displayed.
  24. Make any changes to the BIOS configuration that you desire (for example, disabling NUMLOCK) or that you require (for example, setting Boot Order, enabling UEFI, etc.).
  25. Press the F10 key (followed by the Y key) to save the BIOS Configuration and exit BIOS Setup.
  26. Test.

Here are some additional thoughts:

  • If BIOS Recovery will not start, try using a different USB port. You can try the USB 3.0 ports as well.
  • If switching USB ports didn't work, try using a different USB flash drive.
  • As always, best to use USB flash drive that has an access LED so you can visually see if it is accessed.
  • If you are seeing USB flash drive being accessed but BIOS Recovery does not start, a common cause is compatibility with the memory present. The BIOS Recovery engine, as it is with USB 3.0 flash drives, can be very picky with regards to memory compatibility. Try removing all but one DIMM/SODIMM.
  • For more information on the BIOS Recovery process, consult Intel Desktop Boards Recovery BIOS Update Instructions.

Hope this helps,

...S

HeyJake
Beginner
461 Views

Thanks Scott, I followed the process to the T, originally and now again. The screen doesn't come back.

I did try different USB port and flash drive hoping for a different outcome, O and removed additional Memory modules. Looks like I bricked the board because of the MAJOR jump in versions, which is sad considering the lack of communication regarding this risk and the lack of other versions being available....I did my research before starting the process and nothing mentioned about this.

I still don't understand why Intel removed all the support, documents and drivers for the board from the website even if official support has been ended. I not happy with Intel at this point but complaining about that won't bring back the board.

 

Anyhow Thanks for the help Scott.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
449 Views

Sorry this happened to you.

This would probably be documented properly if it wasn't for Intel's braindead decisions to (a) not offer any kind of support for products older than 6 years and (b) pulling the driver bundles for older products off the web site (a completely unfathomable decision). I am retired but spend time helping folks here because I find Intel's management decisions embarrassing and I feel guilty about it. If we volunteers weren't here, there would be no support at all.

BTW, those random reboots that you saw early on were an indication that the board (its Management Engine (ME)) was already in trouble. Fact is,  you shouldn't have been seeing any reboots after a raw installation of Windows 10. Provided you are using an add-in graphics card (because 2nd gen iGFX is *NOT* supported), these boards are almost completely covered by Windows 10's inbox drivers.

You were using an add-in graphics card, right? If so, what exact card (full vendor model number please) did you use? Was this card working on Windows 7?

...S

HeyJake
Beginner
418 Views

Sorry for my delayed response.

 

I was using the onboard graphics.

 

As for Windows 10 installation, I suspect the first install failed some how and was the cause of the rebooting. My reasoning: it looked more like windows safe mode than windows 10. This in combination with BIOS not being updated...not sure if Windows 10 was supported by the old BIOS.

 

Thanks for your assistance.

 

I wish Intel wouldn't bully their customers, we are the reason they continue to exist.

 

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