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mwils4
Beginner
3,511 Views

DQ45CB+UEFI+Windows 8.1

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I am attempting to install Windows 8.1 Pro x64 in EFI mode on the Intel DQ45CB motherboard. The BIOS version is the latest (133 released in 2011) and defaults have been loaded, before enabling UEFI and AHCI modes. I have been able to boot into the EFI shell, format the HDD correctly(four partitions for EFI) and began installing Windows 8.1. However, after Windows Installation does it's first reboot, I am unable to continue the install. Booting from the HDD(which does show an EFI boot partition) I get a message about kernel not being found and I am presented with options to try and boot into safe mode, etc. My installation method is DVD as USB boot does not appear to be supported in EFI mode. I have looked at guides for other Intel motherboards and have not been able to figure out what to try next. Any help is appreciated.

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rblis1
Beginner
940 Views

The DQ45CB will boot in UEFI mode with x64 Windows 10, and probably in Windows 8 and 7 as well. I am running Windows 10 booted with UEFI/GPT right now as I type this reply. In addition to setting the board to use UEFI, you have to set the SATA mode in the BIOS to RAID and supply an "F6" Intel ICH10 RAID driver downloaded from Intel's website during Windows installation. I got the same errors as the OP time and time again until I came across this hint in another forum. You don't have to pre-format the drives or anything; setup will do that for you, creating four partitions on an empty (GPT) drive. Unfortunately, setting the SATA mode to AHCI and supplying an F6 Intel ICH10 AHCI driver during Windows installation does not work. You just get the same behavior as if you didn't supply the driver.

-robert

 

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17 Replies
Silvia_L_Intel1
Employee
940 Views

First of all, I would like to inform you that this motherboard has been out of support since December, 2012.

http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-033901.htm http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-033901.htm

Also, Windows 8 or 8.1 is not a supported operating system for this specific motherboard therefore; there are no plans for making drivers. http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-008326.htm http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-008326.htm

As far as I remember, 4th series motherboards do not come with UEFI and this feature is require in order to install Windows 8.1.

rblis1
Beginner
941 Views

The DQ45CB will boot in UEFI mode with x64 Windows 10, and probably in Windows 8 and 7 as well. I am running Windows 10 booted with UEFI/GPT right now as I type this reply. In addition to setting the board to use UEFI, you have to set the SATA mode in the BIOS to RAID and supply an "F6" Intel ICH10 RAID driver downloaded from Intel's website during Windows installation. I got the same errors as the OP time and time again until I came across this hint in another forum. You don't have to pre-format the drives or anything; setup will do that for you, creating four partitions on an empty (GPT) drive. Unfortunately, setting the SATA mode to AHCI and supplying an F6 Intel ICH10 AHCI driver during Windows installation does not work. You just get the same behavior as if you didn't supply the driver.

-robert

 

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SFles
New Contributor I
940 Views

Thanks. I was trying to load Server 2012 in UEFI mode for my 4TB mirrored drives, but couldn't figure out how. I cheated by loading it from the new Dell I picked up, then moving it to the DQ45. I will have to try this the next time I have some free time. Are the RAID drivers fairly comprehensive (covers many OSes and boards)? This one: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/15251/RAID-Intel-Rapid-Storage-Technology-Driver-for-Intel... Download RAID: Intel® Rapid Storage Technology Driver for Intel Desktop Boards ?

Miguel_C_Old
Employee
940 Views

Hi sflesch,

Microsoft® Windows Server 2012 is not compatible with Intel® desktop motherboard (Home Use); however, you can install the operating system and use generic drivers of Microsoft® Windows. The hardware might not be recognized properly.

Please review the case below.

 

http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-008326.htm Desktop Boards — Supported Operating Systems

Regards,

 

Mike C
SFles
New Contributor I
940 Views

Thanks. It is compatible. you just don't support it. Windows 8 drivers work perfectly fine.

Miguel_C_Old
Employee
940 Views

Hi,

Thank you for your feedback. We provided with the official Intel® documentation.

Regards,

 

Mike C
sunnybh
Beginner
632 Views

I know I am responding to an old post but please can you post detailed steps for UEFI for DQ45CB. I have tried all what you have posted here but still not getting UEFI. Thanks

AlHill
Super User
628 Views

This is (which you know) a 6-year old thread.

Start a new one.

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
619 Views

[ IDK if a new thread is worth it Al, you and I will probably be the only folks responding anyway. ]

What should work is going into BIOS Setup and setting the SATA Mode to AHCI and enabling UEFI Boot. Then during the Windows 10 installation (I wouldn't even futz with Windows 8.1; if all you have is a Windows 8.1 license key, just use it to install Windows 10), when you get to the scene where you specify where to install Windows 10, delete *ALL* partitions on the system drive and tell Windows 10 to install to the unused space (which now encompasses all of the drive).

If, at the point where the Windows 10 installation reboots, the drive is NOT bootable, then you will have to follow the workaround defined above. Change the SATA Mode to RAID and then, during the Windows 10 installation when it gets to the scene where you specify where you want to install Windows 10, first load the F6FLPY drivers from the Intel RST package and then proceed to delete all partitions on the boot drive and tell the installer to install Windows 10 to the unused space on the drive (which now encompasses all of the drive).

Clear as mud?

....S

sunnybh
Beginner
616 Views

Thanks for replying. I have actually done the 2nd part -"Change the SATA Mode to RAID and then, during the Windows 10 installation when it gets to the scene where you specify where you want to install Windows 10, first load the F6FLPY drivers from the Intel RST package and then proceed to delete all partitions on the boot drive and tell the installer to install Windows 10 to the unused space on the drive (which now encompasses all of the drive)."

This did not work, I don't get UEFI, still getting legacy bios. I even tried changing to GPT through diskpart while installing win 10.

I am now going to try the 1st part and see if it works.

sunnybh
Beginner
607 Views

I have tried AHCI, with and without F6 drivers for AHCI, but it gives bsod error, and fails to load win10.

And with RAID, win10 comes up(loaded F6 RAID drivers), but cannot get uefi instead of legacy bios. Win 10 system information shows UEFI, and disk info shows GPT. But disk management shows BASIC under type, whereas it should be dynamic if RAID, not sure though.

Keep getting legacy bios still. I have win 10 pro.

 

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
577 Views

This is the fault of your installation media; it is not supporting UEFI boot. Use the Microsoft Windows 10 Media Creation Wizard and let it format and load the USB Flash disk. You can get it from here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10.

...S

sunnybh
Beginner
565 Views

I have this also.

The steps I have taken are as follows:

1.  Set the SATA mode in the BIOS to RAID and supplied an "F6" Intel ICH10 RAID driver downloaded from Intel's website during Windows installation

3. Set the board to use UEFI

2. Used Microsoft Windows 10 Media Creation Wizard installation media

Windows installation goes fine. Can see uefi in system information, can see GPT in volume information

I think I have latest firmware of bios version 133 of 2011, so don't want to flash it again.

I can't make out what step am I missing here.

 

Is it any step after enabling RAID in SATA and and enabling Intel Rapid Recover Technology

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
557 Views

I am confused. You say Windows installation went fine yet, in the next breath, you say that some step is missing? Can you boot from this Windows installation or not? If not, what does happen? Is this disk present in the Boot Order information in the BIOS?

...S

sunnybh
Beginner
553 Views
Sorry if it created any confusion.

What I meant was - installation went fine, I can boot to this new windows installation, there is no problem with windows.
My only question is about UEFI, which I cannot see. I still see legacy bios, not uefi when pc boots up I go into bios set up.
After booting, within the windows, I can see uefi in system information.
I was hoping to see uefi instead of legacy bios after enabling sata to raid and enabling uefi in bios before clean install of windows with gpt

Hope I am clear this time.
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
550 Views

First of all, BIOS Setup isn't going to change. This board was released years before any of the graphical BIOS Setup capabilities were made available. Do not equate having a Graphical BIOS Setup capability as having anything to do with UEFI (that was Marketing bu11sh1t from one of the motherboard vendors). While it is true that UEFI includes API support that makes it easier to implement, there is absolutely nothing stopping you from having a graphical BIOS Setup capability in an older, completely non-UEFI BIOS (it just wasn't considered important back then).

As for Windows 10, check out this article: How to Check if Windows 10 is using UEFI or Legacy BIOS.

...S

sunnybh
Beginner
542 Views
Thanks for this explanation.
This explains perfectly. I checked and confirmed my windows is using uefi, so that’s fine.
I will have to live with the current non graphic bios.
As this - “ While it is true that UEFI includes API support that makes it easier to implement, there is absolutely nothing stopping you from having a graphical BIOS Setup capability in an older, completely ”
seems complicated and not sure whether it will add any value.

Thanks so much for taking time and clarifying
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