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BF_
New Contributor II
3,008 Views

Driver PCI returned invalid ID for a child device (DZ68BC)

Is anyone seeing this error in their System log, regardless of motherboard? I see it upon restart. I've found two references to it online, both related to problems resuming from sleep, and they were fixed by adjusting PCI Express "Link State Power Management" in advanced power settings (Win7). That didn't help here, however. Not everyone has an issue with sleep though, and I fall in that category. I just want to find what's causing the message and eliminate it. I should note that it started happening very early on in the Windows installation; the paste below is so early that I hadn't even given the PC a name yet (what you're seeing there is a default name)--so the installation was minutes old. Of course, subsequently I installed the chipset software along with the latest drivers etc (BIOS was updated before installation).

Log Name: System

 

Source: Application Popup

 

Date: 12/10/2011 12:33:52 PM

 

Event ID: 56

 

Task Category: None

 

Level: Error

 

Keywords: Classic

 

User: N/A

 

Computer: 37L4247F27-25

 

Description:

 

Driver PCI returned invalid ID for a child device (FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF00).

 

Event Xml:

 

http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">

 

 

 

56

 

2

 

0

 

0x80000000000000

 

 

30

 

System

 

37L4247F27-25

 

 

 

 

 

 

PCI

 

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF00

 

000000000300280000000000380004C000000000380004C000000000000000000000000000000000

 

 

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29 Replies
PMurp4
Valued Contributor II
380 Views

I've seen problems in Event Manager with fresh installs on my DG45ID before installing the drivers so I wouldn't worry about errors being generated at that stage of things. Are you using UEFI or ordinary old BIOS booting (I'm assuming the board is capable of either) and does changing from one to the other affect this error? When you updated to the latest BIOS prior to installing the OS, I assume you went into the BIOS setup straight afterwards and loaded BIOS Default settings and saved out of there (surprisingly this has made a difference with some problems I've seen posted about here, even though I'd assume the BIOS update should result in Default Settings at the end automatically).

If there are any non-essential devices plugged into the board, I'd remove them and test again just to rule out that external device firmware or drivers are playing a part. Finally, how is Device Manager looking?

BF_
New Contributor II
380 Views

-Yes, I agree that errors showing that early aren't critical, especially if they disappear once configured (which this one didn't), but I mentioned it because it shows that it wasn't something done later that caused it.

-I don't have UEFI enabled, if UEFI is what I'm quoting below (I actually thought it was more than this), since the scant text about it merely said this, which sounds completely N/A to me. Are you saying that it makes some difference beyond this? Or is there another setting I'm missing? Can you switch at will without screwing things up?

UEFI Boot: Enables or disables Unified Extended Firmware Interface (UEFI) Boot. UEFI Boot must be enabled in order to boot to a drive larger than 2 TB (terabytes).

 

 

Enable: BIOS will attempt to boot via UEFI before using the legacy boot sequence.

 

Disable: BIOS will use the legacy boot sequence.

-I did happen to load BIOS defaults back then, but only because I made changes to a section that I wanted to quickly undo. I didn't realize that it should be done as a matter of course, since the instructions make no mention of it. I have heard that advice for other brands, however, like a particular Gigabyte board I know. I'll do it in the future for good measure.

http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-030144.htm http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-030144.htm

-I just have essential devices plugged in.

-Device Manager went surprisingly well. It wasn't all that bad directly after install, and almost perfect after the chipset software. I think I just had to install one or two drivers after that to make it perfect.

For reference, this is not an unprecedented problem, though I should emphasize that I do not see the mentioned out-of-sleep issue (and the listed fix made no difference here).

http://www.msigman.com/2011/11/driver-pci-returned-invalid-id-child-device http://www.msigman.com/2011/11/driver-pci-returned-invalid-id-child-device

PMurp4
Valued Contributor II
380 Views

To be honest I've not much experience with UEFI because the few times I tried installing my 64 bit version of Win 7 with my DG45ID using that option in my BIOS, one of the main advantages (IMO), support for over 2.2 TB volumes, was no use to me because the Intel RST (RAID) on my board, won't boot off volumes larger than 2 TB. I've therefore chosen to stick with ordinary BIOS and configuring my RAID as 2 TB RAID 0+1.

The UEFI boot requires a supported OS but I assume you're using 64 bit Win 7 or can get it (my retail version comes with both so you can take your pick and install either). Instead of an MBR, the boot volume has a GUID Partition Table so you would need to do a fresh install from scratch (unless someone else knows of a short cut?). Although Intel was the company behind EFI to begin with, it's surprisingly difficult to find any 'plain English' (non-techno babble) articles on it on their website (again maybe someone else has found something that wouldn't make my eyes glaze over half way through). The best I've found about UEFI is the Wikipedia page covering the subject but even that's quite hard going in places - still worth a try though!

The reason I asked this question was because if the problem goes away under UEFI mode, that may indicate a problem with the BIOS code. If you test the system under both and report the findings to Intel Tech Support via creating a case, that'd be the way to go. At least because it doesn't seem to impact performance, you can carry on using the PC until a resolution is obtained.

BF_
New Contributor II
380 Views

I was afraid that you'd say it'd require a reinstall. While I do have W7 x64, I don't think I could bear to do that again so soon, but I'd reconsider when W8 is released (this would also give Intel more time to work out any UEFI kinks). Even if the problem didn't go away with UEFI though, I think it could still easily be a problem with the BIOS code, right? If someone could confirm, then I'll try reporting it.

BF_
New Contributor II
380 Views

idata
Community Manager
380 Views

Yes I was the OP in that thread and I've been looking into this a bit further.

I did a registry search for FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF00 and found 3 entries, all connected to Renesas USB 3.0 driver.

tbh I'm no nearer a solution . The registry entries look as though they could be corrupt but removal reveals that they are needed.

It could be that Windows is seeing the Renesas USB 3 driver as a PCI device at bootup hence the error message but why in my case would this be caused by a BIOS update?

Apologies for posting on the Intel forum when I have an MSI mobo but it seems there is a common problem.

PMurp4
Valued Contributor II
380 Views

Have you folks all been good PC BIOS flashers and removed/unplugged all USB devices before starting to flash? This could definitely cause probs if not the case.

[Edit: make that all non-essential USB devices]

BF_
New Contributor II
380 Views

Flying_Kiwi, no, since USB devices include such things as the keyboard and the flash file for the BIOS itself. When did this become something to do? What's next, ensure the PC is unplugged from the wall?

Doogie: Yes, using RegScanner (which is easier for things like this), it shows up 176 times here. It looks directly tied to Renesas, since many of the entries also mention PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0194&SUBSYS_201C8086&REV_04. This started happening even before Windows had finished installing for me, so before I even installed the Renesas driver. Perhaps it's something the driver could address though. Or perhaps it's a Windows issue, since as you said in the other thread, maybe it's confusing it for a PCI device.

Does anyone who also has this device not show this event in the System log?

PMurp4
Valued Contributor II
380 Views

rseiler wrote:

Flying_Kiwi, no, since USB devices include such things as the keyboard and the flash file for the BIOS itself. When did this become something to do? What's next, ensure the PC is unplugged from the wall?

.... of course that would solve all your PC related problems but it's been the case that you should always only ever flash BIOS files with a minimal system configuration all along and that means unplugging or removing any 'non-essential' devices. This is due to the fact that if parts of the board are being used during the update, it could interfere with the flash update itself. There are several cases where users with recent sandybridge boards containing onboard graphics flashed their BIOS with discrete graphics cards still installed and then lost their graphics capability (can't recall if it was the onboard or discrete card that stopped working). Those users with the same boards who flashed the upgrade but didn't have a graphics card plugged in didn't have any problems. Ideally any upgrades should try to take account of possible plugged in extras but there are so many combinations that it'd be impossible to take account for all possibilities.

These days a USB keyboard or mouse is often unavoidable since PS2 ports disappeared and using a USB thumbdrive for the upgrade files is a convenient way to go (although you could burn a CDROM) but it's easy to forget non-essentials such as UPS devices, printers and even internally connected USB devices like memory card readers and in-case LCD screens etc. If you get problems and these weren't unplugged during the upgrade, a reflash without non-essential extras plugged in should definitely be the first thing to try.

idata
Community Manager
380 Views

Since I narrowed this error down to something to do with the Renesas USB 3.0 and I'm not running any USB 3 devices I diabled USB 3 in the BIOS.

Result = no more error message.

BF_
New Contributor II
380 Views

It's distressing to hear the example of having a PCI-E card installed (not that the other ones are much better--USB just shouldn't have any sway over the process). A video card is a major inconvenience to remove for every flash, and there should be no valid reason that using one would cause a problem (i.e., if it does, it's a horrible design flaw in the update process). Do you have a link for a representative thread? With flashing, other than losing power, I thought the only thing to worry about was doing it from Windows, so that's something I try to avoid when possible.

BF_
New Contributor II
380 Views

Sure, I would have expected that, but with it disabled you won't know of any future action/update that actually solves the problem.

idata
Community Manager
380 Views

Yes I realise that but I'll update to a newer BIOS when MSI release one and turn USB 3 on again to check it.

It would be interesting to see if the error was still generated if I had a USB 3 device plugged in.

PMurp4
Valued Contributor II
380 Views

DooGie wrote:

Since I narrowed this error down to something to do with the Renesas USB 3.0 and I'm not running any USB 3 devices I disabled USB 3 in the BIOS.

Result = no more error message.

That's given me an idea - with nothing plugged into the USB 3.0 ports and USB 3.0 remaining disabled in the BIOS, have another go at flashing the same BIOS version onto the motherboard. Only a little time to potentially loose but you may find that the fact it's not in use at all (not even by the OS) makes a difference and solves the issue. If it was mine, I'd give that a try to see if it makes a difference. Of course (for those with Intel boards) this should also be reported to Intel Tech Support so they create a ticket and escalate it as well. As yours is an OEM board, it should be reported to the manufacturer for them to investigate and pass on to their suppliers if needed to achieve a resolution.

(I put the missing 's' into your quoted 'disabled')

PMurp4
Valued Contributor II
380 Views

rseiler wrote:

A video card is a major inconvenience to remove for every flash, and there should be no valid reason that using one would cause a problem (i.e., if it does, it's a horrible design flaw in the update process). Do you have a link for a representative thread?

When you say 'every' flash, remember that manufacturers only recommend you flash the BIOS when there's an issue you need to fix on your system so if you're only flashing to have the latest and (supposedly ) greatest then you could wean yourself off the flashing habit down to only once yearly (if you absolutely must - perhaps before performing an OS reinstall). There's always a list of fixes in the notes on the download page for each BIOS flash so it should be fairly straightforward to work out if a new BIOS is really needed.

I don't have a link but the BIOS version I'm thinking about for a group of the sandybridge boards was withdrawn from the website - presumably because of lots of 'issues' with it. Try searching this forum for 'no video after BIOS upgrade' or similar if you want to see the threads. I agree it's an inconvenience to remove a graphics card in order to have to flash and you shouldn't have to do this but if you want to be sure the card isn't interfering with the process, that's the most positive way to do it. If ever theres a problem where outside components are potentially involved, the standard test is to remove those potential outside influences from the equation and see if the problem is still there - if it is then you know it's definitely an internal issue.

idata
Community Manager
380 Views

tbh Flying_Kiwi now I know what the issue is I'm not that bothered. Everything I'm using is working as it should and I'm not too keen on BIOS updating just for the sake of it.

However I may see what the situation is when a new BIOS update is available for my mobo or if I get a USB3 device.

RGiff
Honored Contributor I
380 Views

Windows 7 64Bit , Has a big problem with UN-signed driver's isw the driver you are using ( Signed ) or UN-Signed >///?????

BF_
New Contributor II
380 Views

Very likely signed, but it happens pre-driver.

PMurp4
Valued Contributor II
173 Views

DooGie wrote:

tbh Flying_Kiwi now I know what the issue is I'm not that bothered. Everything I'm using is working as it should and I'm not too keen on BIOS updating just for the sake of it.

That's a recipie for lowering stress levels if ever I've seen it If you haven't already reported it to MSI I would do so and raise a ticket though - so if they haven't yet spotted the issue, they can add it to their 'to do' list for the next BIOS update for your board.

FWIW I have absolutely no issue with you chipping in with your MSI experiences here because as you say, it seems an issue common to .... comparible () Intel branded boards with this same USB 3.0 chipset. All the best achieveing a resolution.

BF_
New Contributor II
173 Views

A friend also had this board, so before he flashed I had him disable USB3 until after the flash. It makes no difference. This is going to have to be something fixed in the BIOS or compensated for somehow in the driver.

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