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SCulp2
Beginner
1,337 Views

Intel Desktop Board DX58SO

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Hi Guys

Sure some whizz here can help, have tried searching online but whatever I have tried does not seem to resolve my issue.

I am getting an old(er) computer up and running which has the following spec:

Intel i7 920 @ 2.67GHz CPU

Intel DX58SO Motherboard

Quality 700W PSU

8GB Ram (4 x 2GB)

24in G2400W BENQ Monitor

250GB SSD (Drive C, Boot device) - SATA slot 1

1.5TB SATA HDD (Drive D) - SATA slot 3

DVD/RW (Drive E) - SATA slot 5

Wireless Keyboard and Mouse

Winfast GTS 250 1024MB

Wireless Network Card

USB3.0 expansion card

Integrated audio and LAN

This PC always used to run fine but I am now noticing that the system boots twice before doing what I would call the "normal" start up. On the initial boot it will get as far as:

Marvell 88SE61xx Adapter - Bios Version 1.1.0.L70

Adaptor 1

Disks Information:

No hard disk is detected

It will then appear to do exactly the same all over again but at this stage (as shown above) the second time carry on through to the SSD boot and start the Windows 10 I have installed.

It's not a biggie as all appears to work ok, but it's irritating me as I know it never used to do this and I have no idea why it has started it!

NOTE: I added the SSD drive as part of the "restart", but if I recall it was there when I initially started the project before I fitted the SSD. I have also loaded the "optimal settings" in the BIOS

Any help to resolve this double boot much appreciated. Thanks in advance

Steve C.

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1 Solution
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
143 Views

When this happens, it usually means that the memory failed to run at the configured settings. What happens is the memory bus hangs. The Watchdog Timer (eventually) gets everything going again and the BIOS retries the initialization - but this time at lower settings. If this works, everything runs fine (just the memory interface is a bit slower).

OK, why does this occur? It is old age setting in. The memory, the board and the processor are aging and they get noisier as they do so. This is perfectly normal. The problem is the noise level does not allow the memory to run at the highest (previously) supported speed.

What to do? You could just leave it. You don't have to boot it that often. Leave it running all the time. Or, you could manually change the memory configuration to always use the lower settings (and avoid the secondary POST). The third option is to try replacing the DIMMs, but this may accomplish nothing, so I don't recommend it.

Hope this helps,

. .S

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2 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
144 Views

When this happens, it usually means that the memory failed to run at the configured settings. What happens is the memory bus hangs. The Watchdog Timer (eventually) gets everything going again and the BIOS retries the initialization - but this time at lower settings. If this works, everything runs fine (just the memory interface is a bit slower).

OK, why does this occur? It is old age setting in. The memory, the board and the processor are aging and they get noisier as they do so. This is perfectly normal. The problem is the noise level does not allow the memory to run at the highest (previously) supported speed.

What to do? You could just leave it. You don't have to boot it that often. Leave it running all the time. Or, you could manually change the memory configuration to always use the lower settings (and avoid the secondary POST). The third option is to try replacing the DIMMs, but this may accomplish nothing, so I don't recommend it.

Hope this helps,

. .S

View solution in original post

SCulp2
Beginner
143 Views

Many, many thanks. What you say makes perfect sense. I played with the settings in the BIOS but nothing I did (probably as I was scared to change the wrong thing!) made any difference and so I will live with it as it is..... Many thanks for the help, appreciate it and your time!

Cheers

Steve C.

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