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Valued Contributor I
998 Views

Use both on-board sound and discrete sound card

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The traditional advice is to disable on-board sound when installing a discrete sound card, but then again that's from the days of IDE drives. However, that advice is usually not followed when a discrete graphics card including sound is added. I sent a query to ASUS and their advice was to not disable on-board sound when using one of their graphics cards.

I have a DZ68BC with a Creative sound card, one of the best it ever produced. But Creative never released a Linux driver for it. Now that Microsoft is playing hardball with W-10 updates, I want to convert this PC into one that can run W-7 or a few flavors of Linux simply by switching SSD system drives in a dock. I've got the front jacks connected to the Creative card, so the only time the on-board Realtek output would be accessed is when I insert a plug into the motherboard connectors. I'll use the Creative card with W-7 and the on-board Realtek with Linux. Hence my question: would there be any problem in leaving the on-board Realtek running alongside the Creative card?

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Super User Retired Employee
7 Views

Provided they are not sharing resources (which I don't believe they do), you should be able to have both running. You will have to use the Volume Mixer to switch playback from one to the other if you want to use both from within Windows. I cannot say for Linux...

...S

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Super User Retired Employee
8 Views

Provided they are not sharing resources (which I don't believe they do), you should be able to have both running. You will have to use the Volume Mixer to switch playback from one to the other if you want to use both from within Windows. I cannot say for Linux...

...S

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Valued Contributor I
7 Views

It looks like I have another successful project, thanks again.

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7 Views

Hello, paramountain:

I am glad to hear that Scott's contribution was useful for you.

If you require any further information or support, feel free to contact us back.

Regards,

Esteban C

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Valued Contributor I
7 Views

I changed the setting in BIOS to activate Realtek sound, installed the device driver, and tested in W-7. There do not appear to be any sound artifacts. Then I took a spare SSD and installed Fedora. I was surprised to see that it recognized both Realtek and Creative audio, as Creative does not have a device driver on its website (Linux developers must have created an open-source device driver). I was able to listen to YouTube via both audio sources. Then I tried something else that had eluded me before. Windows offers WMA Lossless format for best CD fidelity, but Fedora's RhythmBox would not play it. I installed VLC on Fedora and was able to play WMA Lossless and all other formats. Who needs Windows? And Linux is free!

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7 Views

Hello, paramountain:

Thank you for the information provided about this scenario and how the system interacts with the OS' tested.

If you require any further information or support, feel free to contact the Intel Communities back.

Regards,

Esteban C

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