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NONEYO
Beginner
413 Views

dh67gd and dp67de bios update file location

Can someone please point me to the location of the files to update these two boards?

they are at their original version and we need to address the 

Intel-SA-00088 for Intel® Desktop Boards

 

Please be sure to include any versions necessary as to avoid breaking the bios.  I would imagine we need to do it a couple versions at a time etc.  

It would actually be helpful to have all the versions released with the minimum required version for each update.  

Thank you in advance for any help offered.

 

0 Kudos
12 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
397 Views

Tell us exactly what BIOS releases are running on these boards.

...S

NONEYO
Beginner
379 Views

Thanks so much for the reply.

Here are photos with all the AA revisions and bios versions for each. Thank you Mr Pearson for your help.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
365 Views

I have attached the latest BA BIOS (for DP67DE) and BL BIOS (for DH67GD) releases.

In both cases, intermediate BIOS releases are not available. This is problematic because, in each case, one of these intermediate BIOS releases introduces support for 3rd generation processors. Without the intermediate BIOS releases, I do not believe that you will ever be able to use a 3rd generation processor.

You can attempt to install the latest BIOS releases using the BIOS Recovery process. If you get a message saying BIOS Recovery cannot be used for this process, try doing the update using the F7 process.

To help you, here are my step-by-step instructions for BIOS Recovery:

  1. NOTE: Read these instructions completely before starting. Follow all instructions EXACTLY.
  2. On a Windows-based PC (do not use Linux- or MacOS-based PC), make sure that you have the .BIO file for the BIOS release you wish to install.
  3. Insert a 32GB or smaller (the smaller the better) USB 2.0 flash drive into the PC. Do not use USB 3.0 flash drives (most are not compatible). It is also best if you use a flash drive that has an access LED that you can watch.
  4. Format this USB flash drive using the Windows Format applet. Select to install the FAT32 file system (NOT vFAT, NOT exFAT; FAT32 only). You must also specify that the Quick Format option be Disabled (unchecked).
  5. NOTE: If FAT32 is not offered as a choice by the Format applet, your flash drive is too big; use another.
  6. Copy the .BIO file into the root folder of this USB flash drive. This should be the only .BIO file in the root folder of the USB flash drive.
  7. Properly eject the USB flash drive. Do not just yank it out. Do this from File Explorer or using the Safely Remove Hardware and Eject Media System Tray applet.
  8. Power off the Desktop Board system.
  9. Remove the yellow BIOS Configuration jumper from the board. It will be the only yellow jumper; the rest will usually be black.
  10. NOTE: Remember the pins that this jumper was plugged onto; you will need this information later.
  11. Plug the USB flash drive into one of the black USB 2.0 ports on the back panel of the board. Do not use blue or yellow USB 3.0 port. Do not use any front panel USB ports.
  12. Power on the system.
  13. The BIOS Recovery process should start automatically. You should see a progress report on your main monitor.
  14. NOTE: If you do not see a progress report displayed on your monitor, do not power off the system for at least 15 minutes. While it is rare, it is possible for the process to proceed without an onscreen display; you must give it ample time to complete, just in case.
  15. When the BIOS Recovery process is complete, you will be asked to power off the system. Do so.
  16. Restore the yellow BIOS Configuration jumper to the pins it was on previously. This should be across pins 1 and 2 of this (three pin) header.
  17. Remove the USB flash drive from the back panel of the board.
  18. Power on the board.
  19. Immediately begin pressing the F2 key, over and over (approx. once per second) until you see the BIOS Setup (or Visual BIOS) screen displayed.
  20. Verify, using the BIOS version string, that the BIOS installed properly. Stop if it isn't.
  21. Press the F9 key (followed by the Y key) to reset of the BIOS configuration.
  22. Press the F10 key (followed by the Y key) to save the BIOS Configuration and exit BIOS Setup.
  23. Once screen is cleared (goes black), begin pressing the F2 key, over and over, until you see the BIOS Setup screen displayed.
  24. Make any changes to the BIOS configuration that you desire (for example, disabling NUMLOCK) or that you require (for example, setting Boot Order, enabling UEFI, etc.).
  25. Press the F10 key (followed by the Y key) to save the BIOS Configuration and exit BIOS Setup.
  26. Test.

Hope this helps,

...S

NONEYO
Beginner
346 Views

In both cases, intermediate BIOS releases are not available. This is problematic because, in each case, one of these intermediate BIOS releases introduces support for 3rd generation processors. Without the intermediate BIOS releases, I do not believe that you will ever be able to use a 3rd generation processor.

I totally believe this, but when I look at the requirements of a 3rd gen proc. the bios on each system are newer than what it requires.  We confirmed that with intel years ago before purchasing the board (3rd gens were already available).  I have done so again and the processor white sheet confirms such.  I do understand that doesnt mean it will work as it should or could.  Is it best to drop one in before doing the flash in your opinion? I kinda think it makes sense.

I have flashed bios over the years many times and am comfortable with doing so.  But this reply give me an eerie feeling.  I have read it thoroughly and it seems a little wishy washy as to whether this will work.  So before I proceed, can you give me an idea as to the chances of this working?  What are the chances it will brick the board as compared to it being recoverable?  If it simply doesnt work and we can get it  back to its original state, no sweat.  But if it bricks it, we will be taking down the main systems for two different ag operations.  I simply need to make them aware of the risks and be aware myself.  These folks are in a tough sector where money is very tight and I am trying my best to provide a professional courtesy in getting them secured.  The reason for the update was mainly to address the security risk.  I didnt see processer support being an issue.  But the memory leak and such is a huge issue.  

I will be using at most a 1GB drive.  We are looking for a smaller one.  If it would help I would be happy to purchase one as they are still available for purchase in just about any size.  What is your recommendation as the perfect size to use for this application?  Getting one with a light would be more of a challenge but if its necessary, I will find one.  I totally see that need and always prefer that anyway.

Does it matter what display I use?  I have seen this be an issue in the past but its been a long time.  We will be using the HDMI port on a samsung 65in display.  

We will certainly be using a 2.0 drive in the 2.0 port directly to the board.  

You can attempt to install the latest BIOS releases using the BIOS Recovery process. If you get a message saying BIOS Recovery cannot be used for this process, try doing the update using the F7 process.

Not sure I understand what you mean here.  I havent booted the machines to see what that option is/does.  Only have done F2.  Are you just meaning the normal old school upgrade rather than using the bios recovery?

I think thats all I have for now.  I will wait to do this before I proceed.  

One other caveat, one of the systems is remote and I will have to walk another individual down this path.  If there is anyway that we can get verbal help via phone or the like may prove to be handy.  Of course that may deem some compensation to you or involved individuals.  Let me know it that is something we could work out some way some how.  We would be very flexible in this regard considering your perspective.  You have been very helpful and we cant thank you enough!

Thank you

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
332 Views

Um, wait a minute, something is off here...

According to document Updating the BIOS to Support 3rd Generation Intel Core Processors,

  • A 3rd Gen-Ready DP67DE board has AA number G10217-304 or later. A 3rd Gen-Capable DP67DE board has AA number G10217-301. Your DP67DE board has AA number G10217-300. It is not 3rd Gen-Ready and it is not 3rd Gen-Capable.
  • A 3rd Gen-Ready DH67GD board has AA number G10206-210 or later. A 3rd Gen-Capable DH67GD board has AA number G10206-206. Your DH67GD board has AA number G10206-206. It is not 3rd Gen-Ready but it is 3rd Gen-Capable.
  • For DH67GD, the 3rd Gen-Transition BIOS is 132. It is during the upgrade from BIOS 132 to 151 - which you do with a 3rd Gen processor installed - that the system is transitioned to the support of 3rd Gen processors. Your DH67GD board has BIOS 155 installed. Once you have BIOS 151 installed - and it is done with a 2nd Gen processor installed - it is too late; the board can never be transitioned to support 3rd Gen processors. This is your case.

Bottom line, neither of these boards can ever support a 3rd Gen processor.

I was pretty wishy-washy in my description because (1) we did not have the transition or subsequent BIOS releases that are necessary to transition to 3rd Gen processor support (or at least to cross the structural changes boundary) and (2) in an update done by another customer, he was unable to use the BIOS Recovery process to get past the Transition BIOS and had to use iFlash instead.

At the same time, to be honest, I had not done the above analysis - and I should have because I was treating the situation as being the same for both boards and the situation is actually different for each.

  • The DH67GD is past its Transition BIOS and can be updated to BIOS 163 in one step using BIOS Recovery.
  • The DP67DE board is the one that I am still leery of. Because of #2 above, I am concerned that the same thing might happen. That is, you cannot use BIOS Recovery because of the Transition BIOS process and the transition from BIOS 55 to 83 is a pretty long jump to be making using the more-conventional BIOS upgrade processes (iFlash, etc.). Try upgrading to 83 using the BIOS Recovery process. If the Transition BIOS is an issue, then the operation will simply be rejected, no harm, no foul. How we attempt upgrade after that is a problem that we can take on once we actually know this outcome.

So, chances of bricking? Certainly not zero (sadly, that's never the case), but not that high either. Your concern forced me to dig deeper and I actually have more confidence that I did before.

Regarding flash disk size, anything from 100MB to 32GB should be ok. The issues start at sizes above 32GB; we get into exFAT territory and the BIOS Recovery process doesn't handle the exFAT file system very well.

Display size doesn't matter. Display resolution is the issue. The boards only have support for HDMI 1.4, so a monitor that supports 4K is really problematic. There's also the issue of HDCP; there might be problems on some TV inputs; change input if the first doesn't work. Make sure it works before starting any BIOS Recovery operation.

I just thought of something: The text display is 80 characters x 25 lines. A 65" TV for your display? Stand WAAAAY back!     ;^)

There are a number of methods for BIOS installation,

  1. DOS-based iFlash. The iFlash (or iFlash2) tool loads BIO file specified into memory and does a special reset of the system. During POST, the BIOS recognizes that there is a BIO file sitting in memory and begins its installation.
  2. F7. Pressing F7 during BIOS POST will bring up a dialog where you select the device and then BIO file to be installed. The BIOS loads this file into memory and does a special reset of the system. During POST, the BIOS recognizes that there is a BIOS sitting in memory and begins its installation.
  3. Express BIOS Update (EBU). The executable loads the BIO file into memory and does a special shutdown-reset of the system. During POST, the BIOS recognizes that there is a BIO file sitting in memory and begins its installation.
  4. BIOS Recovery. The Recovery BIOS (invoked because jumper removed) looks for a device with a BIO file in its root directory. It loads this BIO file into memory and does a special reset. The Recovery BIOS recognizes that the BIO file is in memory and begins its installation. This installation differs from the other methods in that every capsule in the BIO file is installed, regardless of its version. The Recovery BIOS can also install the ME firmware if the ME is not running (thereby offering a method of recovering the operation of the ME should its firmware be corrupted).

All four method, for the most part, are pretty similar: load BIO file into memory, reset system, install BIO file found in memory. This process is highly secure since it is a component of the existing BIOS that does the actual installation and it can perform a secure decryption of the BIO file capsules.

I think I addressed every question. As for your remote situation, I am willing to support. I'm retired, so lots of free time on my hands. Just remember in planning that I am U.S. West Coast (Pacific time zone).

...S

NONEYO
Beginner
311 Views

I followed the instructions you gave and the system will not read that drive in recovery mode ( with yellow jumper off). Tried several times, never any display on any ports for video so I gave it 20 minutes each time. So I powered down and I tried the F7 method after replacing the yellow jumper. Saw drive and the bios file as expected. It did everything perfectly showed success and it shut down in its own and rebooted. That’s as far as it got. On reboot, no display, no beeps nothing. Power or reset buttons are non responsive and I can’t get to anything now. This is only on the DH67GD only. I’ve been working on intel boards for almost 30 years. This is my first black screen of death. I obviously did something wrong. Is there anyway we can get this system recovered? I attached a photo. The last step was successful it I wasn’t fast enough to get a photo.
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
300 Views

First of all, disconnect power cord, press and hold power button for 10 seconds and then reconnect power cord. Try powering on.

If that didn't work, power off, move yellow jumper from pins 1-2 to pins 2-3 and then power on. This should get you into BIOS Setup in Maintenance Mode. Use F9 (followed by Y) to reset BIOS Configuration and F10 (followed by Y) to save and exit.

If that didn't work, power off, remove yellow jumper, insert that flash disk with only the BL0163.BIO file in the root folder and power on. You should see the BIOS Recovery installation progress on screen.

...S

NONEYO
Beginner
277 Views

I unplugged the cord and held power down for 10 seconds. Plugged back in powered up, still no display. But the power does shut off now using the power button. Can I go ahead with the next option using jumper to get into maintenance mode?
Thanks
NONEYO
Beginner
254 Views

I’m a little concerned at this point. I hope all is well as there’s been no response to my last post. I will proceed with the other options you provided in your last post. If there’s any way we can speak over the phone that would help tremendously on my side. I don’t know how to facilitate that and retain our privacy. I have no problem giving you my information but I can’t post it publicly. Thanks for your help and hopefully I hear from you soon.
Thanks
NONEYO
Beginner
247 Views

I have now tried all the options you provided. The recovery option when I turned on this time beeped which it’s never done. Left thumb drive in for 15 minutes but it never tried to access the drive. It never in any of your steps tried to access it. Where do we go from here?
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
237 Views

Sorry I haven't been online. Remember that I am retired and (just) a volunteer here. I do have other commitments, primarily the Honey-Do list. Tranquility is only achieved while the Honey-Do list is kept small.

I will be honest, I cannot explain why this happens to one person and not to another (well, other than it is difficult to have all of the requisite BIOS releases). Here are the extra things to try:

  • If BIOS Recovery will not start, try using a different USB port. You can try the USB 3.0 ports as well.
  • If switching USB ports didn't work, try using a different USB flash drive.
  • As always, best to use USB flash drive that has an access LED so you can visually see if it is accessed.
  • If you are seeing USB flash drive being accessed but BIOS Recovery does not start, a common cause is compatibility with the memory present. The BIOS Recovery engine, as it is with USB 3.0 flash drives, can be very picky with regards to memory compatibility. Try removing all but one DIMM/SODIMM and see if this makes a difference.

Hope this helps,

...S

P.S. If you want to have a private conversation with me, the forum software does provide a way. Right next to your avatar in the upper-right corner of the scene, there is an envelope icon. Clicking on this icon beings you into the Private Messages interface. You can click on the Compose button in the upper-left corner of the scene and a dialog to compose a message to someone will appear. When you send me a message or a reply, I will get a notification email and can come online to read it and respond. Same goes for you. Next to that Compose icon is a selector for looking at conversations initiated by others (Inbox) and initiated by you (Sent).

NONEYO
Beginner
193 Views

I will try those steps.  I had already tried a different usb port.  I did not try to use a 3.0 port.  I am using a 1GB kingston drive and it has an activity led that I watch.  I will mess with that some and try the memory removal as well.

Thanks!

B

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