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OK1
Beginner
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dp67ba overclocking

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Does motherboard dp67ba support oveclocking?

I'm going to install i5-2500k instead of my current i5-2300. And it only makes sense if MB is capable of overclocking (even potentially, obviously in fact in also depends on the cpu, memory, cooling system etc.).

There are the nesessary options in BIOS (fsb, core multiplier, etc.). However, I've read in the internets, that since it's just "p67" (not "p67 express", like dp67bg) they don't work as one would suggest.

The https://www.intel.com/content/dam/support/us/en/documents/motherboards/desktop/dp67ba/dp67ba_techpro... datasheet says:

The BIOS includes the following options to provide custom performance enhancements

when using Intel Core i7, Intel Core i5, and Intel Core i3 processors in an LGA1155

socket.

• Processor Maximum Non-Turbo Ratio (processor multiplier can only be adjusted down)

• Memory multiplier adjustment

• Memory voltage adjustment

• Graphics multiplier adjustment

I'm confused. Are there any restrictions in "turbo" mode?

There are 2 screenshots of my bios settings attached, maybe they'll help.

P.S.

Just for the info: at the moment BIOS Version is 0072 - BAP6710H.86A.0072.2011.0927.1425.

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n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
165 Views

First of all, whomever spouted this chipset drivel is a complete idiot. There is only one P67, the Intel P67 Express Chipset. The chipset used on the DP67BG and DP67BA is identical.

The DP67BG and DP67BA are drastically different beasts, however. The DP67BG board was specifically designed to support overclocking (though not to the same extent as the boards with Z68 chipset) and has the additional power inputs and heatsinks necessary to support the processor drawing more power. The DP67BA is a lower-cost board and is not outfitted to the same extent. The level of overclocking you will be able to obtain is most definitely going to be lower.

Secondly, the level of overclocking possible is dependent upon the processor support provided by the BIOS. Once the BIOS has been upgraded to (also) support 3rd generation processors (a one-way operation, BTW), some of the overclocking "knobs" that 2nd generation processors supported will be lost as these capabilities are not supported in 3rd generation processors. [Aside: Don't blame the messenger; I wasn't involved in the decision to support only the common subset of capabilities between the two generations.]

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post

1 Reply
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
166 Views

First of all, whomever spouted this chipset drivel is a complete idiot. There is only one P67, the Intel P67 Express Chipset. The chipset used on the DP67BG and DP67BA is identical.

The DP67BG and DP67BA are drastically different beasts, however. The DP67BG board was specifically designed to support overclocking (though not to the same extent as the boards with Z68 chipset) and has the additional power inputs and heatsinks necessary to support the processor drawing more power. The DP67BA is a lower-cost board and is not outfitted to the same extent. The level of overclocking you will be able to obtain is most definitely going to be lower.

Secondly, the level of overclocking possible is dependent upon the processor support provided by the BIOS. Once the BIOS has been upgraded to (also) support 3rd generation processors (a one-way operation, BTW), some of the overclocking "knobs" that 2nd generation processors supported will be lost as these capabilities are not supported in 3rd generation processors. [Aside: Don't blame the messenger; I wasn't involved in the decision to support only the common subset of capabilities between the two generations.]

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post