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What are the scripting languages needed for chip design engineer

Ashokraj
Novice
562 Views

Hi All, 

                I am new to this community. I am currently working as a hardware engineer. I want to take a leap into FPGA. I have few doubts please answer me: That would help me a lot in my learning. 

  1. I have learned verilog. 
  2. I have came across three different scripting languages: python, perl, tcl. Which one should I learn? so that I can reap their benefits in the long run. 
  3. how is the learning curve of FPGA ? is it easy or very steep? Usually how long does it take to learn about FPGA if one is dedicating atleast 8-10 hours per week. 
  4. what is the skills I need to posses to get placed in intel in the field of  FPGA ? 

Job titles can be of various types. In short I want to work on FPGA's I want to know how to get placed. 

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1 Solution
Nurina
Employee
541 Views

Hi,


  1. Great, you should try making FPGA projects. In my opinion, this helps one boosts their understanding about FPGA. You may find these tutorials to be relevant: https://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/programmable/us/en/pdfs/literature/tt/tt_my_first_fpga.pdf https://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/programmable/us/en/pdfs/literature/ug/archives/ug_gs_msa_qii-1...
  2. In my opinion, tcl is very easy to learn if you already know Python. So if you're familiar with Python then you're already set with tcl. As for Perl, you won't really use it unless you're involved in software development (as far as I know). Perl is really similar to C/C++, so if you're already familiar with C/C++, there's space for you to learn Perl once you're hired. Choosing which of the three to study depends which part of the FPGA field you want to enter really, different jobs require different skills. I think you should just learn whichever language you like best. After all, aren't you switching fields out of interest?
  3. I personally don't find it difficult to learn about FPGA. Of course, when you're working in the field you will be required to learn more. To learn the basics (how to design small to medium FPGA projects, how FPGA works, small exposures to different fields of FPGA, etc), I think 1-3 months is enough. FPGA projects can get complicated, and like every field in engineering there's a subject/smaller field for you to be an expert in. Feel free to go through our video lectures on YouTube! NANDLAND is also a good place to start.
  4. Again it depends on the job scope and level. Perhaps you could look at the job listings, see what you're possibly interested to do and try to learn the skills required.

Good luck!


Regards,

Nurina


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3 Replies
Nurina
Employee
542 Views

Hi,


  1. Great, you should try making FPGA projects. In my opinion, this helps one boosts their understanding about FPGA. You may find these tutorials to be relevant: https://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/programmable/us/en/pdfs/literature/tt/tt_my_first_fpga.pdf https://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/programmable/us/en/pdfs/literature/ug/archives/ug_gs_msa_qii-1...
  2. In my opinion, tcl is very easy to learn if you already know Python. So if you're familiar with Python then you're already set with tcl. As for Perl, you won't really use it unless you're involved in software development (as far as I know). Perl is really similar to C/C++, so if you're already familiar with C/C++, there's space for you to learn Perl once you're hired. Choosing which of the three to study depends which part of the FPGA field you want to enter really, different jobs require different skills. I think you should just learn whichever language you like best. After all, aren't you switching fields out of interest?
  3. I personally don't find it difficult to learn about FPGA. Of course, when you're working in the field you will be required to learn more. To learn the basics (how to design small to medium FPGA projects, how FPGA works, small exposures to different fields of FPGA, etc), I think 1-3 months is enough. FPGA projects can get complicated, and like every field in engineering there's a subject/smaller field for you to be an expert in. Feel free to go through our video lectures on YouTube! NANDLAND is also a good place to start.
  4. Again it depends on the job scope and level. Perhaps you could look at the job listings, see what you're possibly interested to do and try to learn the skills required.

Good luck!


Regards,

Nurina


Ashokraj
Novice
535 Views

thanks Nurina for the valuable insights

Nurina
Employee
520 Views

Hi,

 

I’m glad that your question has been addressed, I now transition this thread to community support. If you have a new question, feel free to open a new thread to get the support from Intel experts. Otherwise, the community users will continue to help you on this thread. Thank you.

 

Regards,
Nurina

P/S: If you like my comment, feel free to give Kudos. If my comment solved your problem, feel free to accept my comment as solution!

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