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New Contributor II
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Program Move

Steve:

How do I move a copy of the EXE file for a program called WULF.EXE that is compiled in debug mode to another computer to work on some data. I tis also compiled with MKL routines.

Not done this before - never had to .

John

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You will need to rebuild it in Release configuration, or at the least select the non-debug Run-Time Library from the Fortran > Libraries property page. Then you'll need to install the Intel Compiler redistributables, copy any MKL DLLs you use and possibly install MSVC redistributables for the version you're using.  See https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intelr-composer-redistributable-libraries-by-version for more info.

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New Contributor II
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Many years ago

In a far distant land

With two floppy drives and a Compaq

and MS Fortran 3.0.3 or thereabouts - one just got an exe.

It was a far better time, although the 640 k limit was a challenge.

Thanks

John

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Black Belt
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You are in good company -- see http://www.cnn.com/2016/05/26/us/pentagon-floppy-disks-nuclear/

I remember the MS Pascal and Fortran compilers had two passes, and on some computers you had to switch floppies between pass-1 and pass-2.

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Valued Contributor III
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mecej4 wrote:
You are in good company -- see http://www.cnn.com/2016/05/26/us/pentagon-floppy-disks-nuclear/

I remember the MS Pascal and Fortran compilers had two passes, and on some computers you had to switch floppies between pass-1 and pass-2.

OMG I remember the 2 floppy shoogle, I had a pascal compiler than needed multiple disk swaps for every compile and link....

With regard  to the 640K memory limit - pure luxury! You had the expanded memory with the extra 128K!

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New Contributor II
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mecej4 wrote:

You are in good company -- see http://www.cnn.com/2016/05/26/us/pentagon-floppy-disks-nuclear/

I remember the MS Pascal and Fortran compilers had two passes, and on some computers you had to switch floppies between pass-1 and pass-2.

I am not sure that the new computers or compilers have improved my coding.  I would code for about an hour, being very careful and then compile and run - made a cup of tea whilst the old Portable compiled- then I would fix the errors.

Now I fix a line and compile - I write no faster nor debug any better.

 

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Maybe some day, something like Alexa or Siri will know programming languages. You tell it vaguely what you want, and it will figure out exactly what you mean.

Ah the olden days...

PDP8-L with Teletype KSR33 (10 characters per second paper tape reader/punch), running FORTRAN-II, 3-passes in FORTRAN to produce SABR assembler, then 2 passes in SABR to produce binary, then use binary loader. A "large" program was 4KB or 8KB depending on memory in the PDP8-L. This would take all day to compile, load and run (editing on paper tape was a different story). When programming was like this, you learned how to design right and program right the first time.

Jim Dempsey

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New Contributor II
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1979 Newcastle University - puch cards and a Daemon Computer in the library for everyone - learned Fortran on that one.

1980 could take the cards to the central ITS, 24 hours later pick up the run - yes coding check was important

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