Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted
New Contributor I

Random Numbers and Thoughts

Steve:

In your blog entry on latest FORTRAN you note in London (foggy and dark filled with lure and lustre and beer) aside from that you talk about Stop now being able to call an expression?

Is that now implemented?

I am going to reference Intel Fortran in a paper - how do you want it referenced?  I am sure I asked this before but I do not have it in my Endnote library -- particularly MKL? 

You know is this what you are talking about in images in the blog:

Some programming languages provide a command to take a system image of a program. This is normally a standard feature in Smalltalk (inspired by FLEX) and Lisp, among other languages. Development in these languages is often quite different from many other programming languages. For example in Lisp the programmer may load packages or other code into a running Lisp implementation using the read-eval-print loop, which usually compiles the programs. Data is loaded into the running Lisp system. The programmer may then dump a system image, containing that pre-compiled and possibly customized code - and also all loaded application data. Often this image is an executable, and can be run on other machines. This system image can be the form in which executable programs are distributed — this method has often been used by programs (such as TeX and Emacs) largely implemented in Lisp, Smalltalk, or idiosyncratic languages to avoid spending time repeating the same initialization work every time they start up.

 

TA

 

John

 

0 Kudos
5 Replies
Highlighted

Expression for the stop-code

Expression for the stop-code is a Fortran 2015 feature we have not yet implemented.

You can reference "Intel® Fortran Compiler".

When I reference "images" I mean the term of the Fortran standard relating to coarray applications. When you run a coarray application one or more copies of your program gets run simultaneously. Each of these is called an "image". It isn't what you referenced.

Retired 12/31/2016
0 Kudos
Highlighted
New Contributor I

Author, A. A. (Year). Title

Author, A. A. (Year). Title of work. Location: Publisher.

The book that describes Intel Fortran and MKL I need to reference properly - you have no idea what serious people read for this level of detail

Which is the best book - the manuals -- etc?

Images - I was thinking of first class continuations ie Scheme

0 Kudos
Highlighted

Ok , try this:

Ok , try this:

Intel Corporation (2015). Intel(R) Parallel Studio XE 2016. Santa Clara, CA: Intel

There are many books on Fortran - it depends on what you want. I discussed some of them at https://software.intel.com/en-us/blogs/2013/12/30/doctor-fortran-in-its-a-modern-fortran-world

Retired 12/31/2016
0 Kudos
Highlighted
New Contributor I

Quote:Steve Lionel (Intel)

Steve Lionel (Intel) wrote:

Ok , try this:

Intel Corporation (2015). Intel(R) Parallel Studio XE 2016. Santa Clara, CA: Intel

There are many books on Fortran - it depends on what you want. I discussed some of them at https://software.intel.com/en-us/blogs/2013/12/30/doctor-fortran-in-its-...

Exactly thanks -- does the Parallel Studio cover the MKL libraries or are they a separate book?

I don't need books - I need to reference the use of PARDISO and FEAST -- see REF 25 and 26 on the attached paper - I am using the INTEL versions so I prefer to have a single reference - yours - but I need to make sure it means something to a librarian looking for the reference

 

0 Kudos
Highlighted

The MKL release notes say

The MKL release notes say this about PARDISO:
 

PARDISO (PARallel DIrect SOlver)* in Intel MKL was originally developed by the Department of Computer Science at the University of Basel http://www.unibas.ch . It can be obtained at http://www.pardiso-project.org.

This may give you clues for citation. As for FEAST, I suggest you ask in the MKL forum as I can't find references to that.

Retired 12/31/2016
0 Kudos