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Beginner
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Can not start Windows 10 64 Bit on Intel Compute Stick STK1A32SC (Error: "A bootable device has not been detected")

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Hi, I just bought the Intel Compute Stick STK1A32SC

After turning it on I noticed that it runs on a factory pre-installed version Windows 10 32-bit, but for the applications with which I have to work I need Windows 10 64-bit, then I have formatted it, I modified the startup on UEFI setting it on "Windows 10 64-bit", but after finishing the installation the system does not start, and I get a screen with the following error: "A bootable device has not been detected".

Honestly I do not understand why, this is not explained, because if it were not compatible because in UEFI you can set the "Windows 10 64 Bit" mode? (Photo attached below)

I also tried to set the 32-bit version of Windows on the UEFI, at the beginning I received an error message saying that the installed version of windows is 64 bit, so it can not be loaded because of course in the stick is set to 32-bit mode, but this shows that there was no error in the installation of Windows, and also shows that it is only a problem related to the 64-bit version.

Obviously I also tried to update the bios to the latest version but nothing has changed.

I look forward to your help.

Thank you so much in advance.

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Super User Retired Employee
108 Views

In theory (I haven't tried it), this should work:

  1. Download latest-available Windows 10 64-bit ISO file from Microsoft.
  2. Use Rufus to put this ISO onto a flash stick, choosing GPT partition scheme.
  3. Start Windows 10 installation process.
  4. At the scene where you pick where to install, use commands provided to delete all existing partitions on the eMMC (this is to ensure GPT partition table is created).
  5. Select to install to the unused space (which should be all of the drive now) on the eMMC (this allows Windows 10 to control partitioning).

Hope this helps,

...S

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Highlighted
Super User Retired Employee
109 Views

In theory (I haven't tried it), this should work:

  1. Download latest-available Windows 10 64-bit ISO file from Microsoft.
  2. Use Rufus to put this ISO onto a flash stick, choosing GPT partition scheme.
  3. Start Windows 10 installation process.
  4. At the scene where you pick where to install, use commands provided to delete all existing partitions on the eMMC (this is to ensure GPT partition table is created).
  5. Select to install to the unused space (which should be all of the drive now) on the eMMC (this allows Windows 10 to control partitioning).

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post

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Beginner
108 Views

Thank you so much !!, the system has finally started and it seems to work all right!

I had already done exactly what you said, except for the cancellation of the previous partitions, which evidently blocked the system's departure.

I'm in doubt now .... can the deletion of these partitions lead to system instability in the future?

I really thank you, you saved me.

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Super User Retired Employee
108 Views

No. Only by deleting all partitions can we guarantee that a GPT partition table is laid down. The fact that it worked after doing this tells us that the drive previously had a MBR partition table -- which would only be bootable if using Legacy (non-UEFI) boot.

By deleting all partitions, you did lose the ability to recover to the 32-bit Windows 10 image, but that shouldn't be an issue because one for recovering to the default 64-bit Windows 10 image was created instead.

You are good to go. If you have problems running Windows 10 upgrades (because of additional space 64-bit system files take on disk), you can use a SDHC/SDXC flash as (temporary) extra space for the O/S during the upgrade process.

Hope this helps,

...S

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