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KMill10
Valued Contributor II
2,400 Views

Edison suitable for production quantities?

Hi my question might seem obvious, but I have to be sure.

If I design a prototype product around Edison, is it acceptable that for proper commercial production I'd continue to embed Edison into the product, or should I take the schematic of edison and embed that into the main board of the product?

in other words, is Edison suitable for embedding into commercial products (selling about 200 to 2000 per year, not tens of thousands!) and will Edison continue to be available in it's current form for the foreseeable future?

Tags (1)
13 Replies
CFERR17
New Contributor I
77 Views

Hi,

I am in the same case.

I am sure we can do our own design to answer your first question.

If hopefully the answer is yes for your second question, where can we buy 1000 Intel module for example ?

Diego_V_Intel
Employee
77 Views

Hello guys,

You can design your own custom boards for the Edison module, and make your prototypes and commercial products with no problems. I recommend you to check the Edison FAQ about this topic in the following site: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/boards-and-kits/000005978.html Frequently Asked Questions for Intel® Edison Development Boards and...

SpiderKenny, there aren't plans to change the Edison in the near future.

sylyca, I recommend you to submit a ticket using the following form to get a better response to your question: https://customercare.intel.com/?lang=en-US https://customercare.intel.com/?lang=en-US

Regards,

Diego

VIvan7
New Contributor III
77 Views

>should I take the schematic of edison and embed that into the main board of the product?

Where did you get the schematic of the Edison module to copy it into your product?

Even if you had it, you would have to make a 6-8 layer pcb and ask an advanced manufacturing facility to place and solder all tiny bga chips. That will cost $$$.

You probably think about copying the mini breakout board.

The only crucial thing is a power supply for the Edison module, only 1 voltage. Then the Edison module will provide 3.3V and 1.8V. Select a power chip that is most suitable for your product.

The Serial<->USB chip connection is nice to have on board, but the FTDI chip FT232R costs $3-4. You may just need a breakout board with it for the initial configuration.

If Intel changes the Edison module, it would be nice if it'll keep the socket.

KMill10
Valued Contributor II
77 Views

>Where did you get the schematic of the Edison module to copy it into your product?

I don't! But I'm certain that Intel will have Atom reference designs available for commercial users.

My client would not wish to buy, say, 2000 edison boards up-front. So we'd need to be sure of long term (2 years+) availability before committing to manufacture.

It might be more commercially viable to get a reference design from intel and embed Atom instead, (BGA is no problem). However Edison is a great way to prototype such a product.

KMill10
Valued Contributor II
77 Views

Yip, but I wouldn't want to buy 1000 units up front and then only sell 200 per year.

Although if the product was successful sales could be ten times that.

VIvan7
New Contributor III
77 Views

Your numbers are minuscule for big discounts. You'll be buying Atom processors like x5-Z8300 for $20-30.

The Edison module integrates the Atom processor, RAM, flash, Wi-Fi, power supply for $50. You just add a connector and space for the Edison module on your pcb.

In a couple years, the Edison may be replaced by a more powerful thing. Then you just redo the interface to a new connector.

KMill10
Valued Contributor II
77 Views

Vincenze wrote:

In a couple years, the Edison may be replaced by a more powerful thing. Then you just redo the interface to a new connector.

My client will not tolerate being told he has to re-spin the board every couple of years!

VIvan7
New Contributor III
77 Views

You should ask Intel's marketing department about the long term availability.

Why would a user buy your client's product with the outdated Edison I when the Edison II with twice as much memory, etc will be available?

FerryT
Valued Contributor I
77 Views

Believe it or not, but there are a lot of high valued products out there that sell only in 1000's over the life time (5-10 years). Hint: industrial automation.

However respinning a board design and for instance obtaining certain product certification for the revised board (and not to mention software modification) may easily cost $50000. When the initial design was good enough, there is no value in upgrading to a 'more powerful' processor and it only costs.

Long term availability is key, or alternatively a smooth upgrade path, in this case minimally the Edison form factor, connector and voltage levels should not change for a 10 year period or so.

KMill10
Valued Contributor II
77 Views

Vincenze said "Why would a user buy your client's product with the outdated Edison I when the Edison II with twice as much memory, etc will be available?"

The end user doesn't know what's inside my product.

Do you care what processor is inside, say for example, your washing machine? Does it matter if there is a newer version of that processor? NO! Of course not! It only matters that it works as specified!

(My product is not anything like a washing machine, just using it as a vanilla example).

FerryT Understands the situation, and also understands why as a designer we need to know about long term availability.

VIvan7
New Contributor III
77 Views

Well, you can check the previous version of the Edison. It's called the Galileo.

KMill10
Valued Contributor II
77 Views

Edison, Galileo (and Curie) are all different types of product.