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New Contributor I
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Intel edison replacement

Hi,

I have a great product based on Intel Edison and i am very disapointed to see that Intel Edison is discontinued so far.

Christophe

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Valued Contributor II
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I too am extremely worried - I've just spent upwards of £50K developing products around edison. I frequently asked about long term availability and as recently as last month was told there were no plans to drop Edison.

We are just about to go to market with edison based products. I really can't say how upset I feel now.

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Beginner
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I didn't even do more than some exploratory tinkering with it, and hoped to incorporate it into some low-volume custom designs that never rose to the top of my triage list. I too am pretty upset---the Edison has a lot going for it. I can't fathom how you guys who have or are about to ship product containing Edison must feel. Only two years of production, then three months notice? Ouch.

While there's a lot of "nyah-nyah" going on out there in Maker-land right now, I gotta say: "Intel... seriously?" I'm not alone in thinking that Intel just completely nuked any faith people had in them as a reliable supplier. Clearly you gotta have 7-8 figures to throw around if you want to play ball with Intel.

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Valued Contributor II
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DavidYon I totally agree with.

Thing is, that with better marketing and a bit better support (like having a Linux build that works) this could have been a great product.

There is nothing like it on the market. I cannot find another single embedded linux module with Multiple UARTS, SPI, I2S, I2C and USB, not to mention WiFi and BT in such as great form factor, or at such a great price.

Maybe they'll release the schematics so we can build our own "Edison" modules, but I doubt we could do it at a practical price.

I repeat, with the right marketing and support - this would have been a class leading product.

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Beginner
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SpiderKenny I feel your pain.

For all the dissing I'm seeing out in Makerville, I've yet to see anyone identify a credible replacement for this unique module. Nearly everyone misses the point entirely. I don't care that it's x86 cores. No, I don't want to run DOS or hook up PCIe or VGA. The form factor (ok, for a maker the Hirose connector sucks), baked-in battery management, wireless, plentiful I/O, both Linux and Realtime cores tightly integrated, all combined to make this a unique device that was full of potential.

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New Contributor I
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Hi SpiderKenny,

It's a good idea to have the schematics. I wonder why Intel can't continue to produce Edison ?

Sincerly,

Christophe

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Beginner
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I'm also very disappointed with this, as i just started integrating Edison into a new design. Can we get somebody from Intel on this forum to justify this decision?

Looking forward, can anybody suggest possible alternatives? Small size, relatively low power consumption and compact pin layout are just some of the things i really like in Edison.

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New Contributor I
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Let me join the club of who is at about 90% completion of a one-year development based on Edison.

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New Contributor I
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Add that since some days ago (specifically June 13, 2017) Edison cannot be sold in EU, due to its lack of CE certification according to the Radio Equipment Directive. There's not even the chance of a last buy. Nice job!

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New Contributor I
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I've found nothing like this on the web. Where do you got your information from?

-- edit

nevermind, found the post: and

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New Contributor I
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I found further Information about this directive (written in german) https://www.lancom-systems.de/blog/auf-den-letzten-metern-eu-kommission-lenkt-bei-drohendem-wlan-ver... Auf den letzten Metern: EU-Kommission lenkt bei drohendem WLAN-Verkaufsstopp ein | Auf ein Wort

Source of that article is a publication of the EU on http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/DE/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2017.180.01.0005.01.DEU&toc=OJ:C:20... EUR-Lex - 52017XC0608(01) - EN - EUR-Lex

So according to that directive I guess the Intel is still available?

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Beginner
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Beginner
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The Digi is interesting, but Qty 1 pricing is significantly above the Edison for a fraction of the compute power. At least Digi is less likely to pull the rug out from under you. I do like how the form-factor is more accessible to someone with a basic SMD prototyping shop (grumble, grumble... damned hirose connector.... grumble grumble...).

I didn't spend a lot of time on it, but I couldn't see a convenient sales channel where I could get a sample module or dev board for the IGEP. But then again, I shouldn't have to look very hard---if I do then the company has a marketing problem, at least for guys like me.

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Beginner
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Thanks for the suggestion. The ConnectCore U6 does do what i need, and is pretty well documented.

Cheers

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Novice
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We have the same issue. First lot of the product is built using Edison. We are exploring https://www.artik.io/modules/artik-520/ Samsung ARTIK IoT Platform - ARTIK 520 IoT Module to avoid changing mechanicals of our product.

It fits in the same form factor as Edison and our code is entirely portable to it.

Once we can change the mechanicals, ARTIK 530 is sweet too with $30 for 1K qty.

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Community Manager
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I would like to toot into the same horn regarding the Edison: Luckily I only started evaluating in in the beginning of the year only, so I did not make too many commitments yet, but it is just a pity:

- The Edison is a unique product, which makes it a bit less approachable than a Raspberry, for example because of the connector and 1.8V data lines. But that is also its strength! The form-factor is just awesome for the power it offers.

- I probably misjudged it, but I saw the Edison just getting traction with, for example, Google's IOT-Platforms adding support to it (this was the moment I started paying attention to it)

- Having bought one including its breakout board, I find it actually incredible approachable for what it is...

I really hope that there will be _some_ sort of replacement in the future. The other boards people posted here are also awesome, but it makes me a bit sad that the Edison is pushed over board this quickly... [just to make the statement]

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New Contributor I
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Hi, is the Artic 520 something like pin-to-pin compatible with Edison?

Otherwise I was considering PICO boards from Technexion... take this as example:

http://shop.technexion.com/system-on-modules/pico/pico-modules/picoimx7dr10e04bb.html http://shop.technexion.com/system-on-modules/pico/pico-modules/picoimx7dr10e04bb.html

Yes, it's more expensive, though performance-wise it may be comparable.

Any of you have experience with that?

Also longevity is an issue, wouldn't like to make the same mistake again.

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Beginner
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Don't know what you think of this one::

https://minnowboard.org/ https://minnowboard.org/

It also uses an Intel Atom processor, has Yocto and Window support, which should work with math kernel that I might want to use.

Don't see much about wireless communication, ..... The good thing is that it doesn't get hit by the RED directive.

https://firmware.intel.com/projects/minnowboard-max https://firmware.intel.com/projects/minnowboard-max

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Beginner
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That PICO board is a find. It's the only one I've seen where you have a prayer of moving off Edison to something else without a major hardware redesign. That it has an (allegedly) Edison-compatible Hirose connector is a huge win. Though I wonder whether you could physically put this board on, say, an Edison Arduino breakout without the other two connectors getting in the way. Or the Sparkfun blocks.

The price point is comparable as well. The only thing I see missing is a realtime co-processor to stand in for the Quark, but I wonder how many designs need it or made use of it. It was one of the more intriguing parts of the Edison, for me anyway, and I was looking forward to seeing what it could do. Alas, I guess not.

But as you mention, some gauranteed EOL timeframes would be reassuring. If you can't trust a company as big as Intel to honor their commitments, then who?

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