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Beginner
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Upgrade from Ubuntu 14.04 to 16.04

Looking to upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 in hopes to deal with the wifi consistently dropping on several compute sticks we're running.

What's the approach that others have taken, given that the internal storage does not provide enough space for the upgrade to take place?

Thanks!

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Community Manager
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Hello mjanofsky,

 

 

 

What is the Intel® Compute stick you have?

 

 

 

Regards,

 

 

 

Ivan.

 

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Beginner
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Hi Ivan,

It is the STCK1A8LFC

Thanks!

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Community Manager
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Hello mjanofsky,

 

 

Intel® Compute Stick STCK1A8LFC has 8 GB Embedded Storage, this unit comes with Pre-Installed Operating System Ubuntu 14.04 LTS 64-bit, so in this case if you need more than 8 GB of storage to do the upgrade then it will not be possible.

 

 

Some Intel® Compute sticks are upgradable to other operating system version but this model apparently does not support this option, please see http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/boards-and-kits/intel-compute-stick/000005899.html Supported Operating Systems for Intel® Compute Stick

 

 

You can try posting this problem at the http://linuxiumcomau.blogspot.com/2016/04/intel-atom-hdmi-audio-and-wifi-on.html Ubuntu community as they might have some work around but I cannot guarantee.

 

 

 

Best wishes,

 

 

 

Ivan.

 

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Novice
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Hello mjanofsky,

there is an additional possible solution. Put a fast µSD-Card (min. 32G) in the internal reader and remove the mostly existing vfat or exFat and generate a new ext4 partition.

My Proposal is to use this as home partition. So you can mount it at first with other name (e.g. /home1) than you move all data from /home to /home1. Depending of the existing partitioning (w/ or w/o dedicated /home partition) - you must remove the home partition and resize the root partition or not. Later on you have an 8GB /root and all data via home on the fast µSD-Card. Don't forget to rename /home1 back to /home.

Remark1: Please use only high quality and high speed SD Cards - I prefer the fastest Samsung or SanDisk Cards (due to the fact that a data loss due to a defect, the complete /home will be lost)

Remark2: I propose to backup all data (/home and /etc - sometimes also /root) and install 14.04 or 16.04 new and restore data. In case from a different version, you can't easily restore /etc!

http://askubuntu.com/questions/492054/how-to-extend-my-root-partition partitioning - How to extend my root partition? - Ask Ubuntu

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowtoPartition HowtoPartition - Community Help Wiki

http://gparted.org/ GParted -- A free application for graphically managing disk device partitions

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Beginner
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Great, thanks for this information.

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Valued Contributor II
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One possible downer: in http://ubuntu-manual.org//download/16.04/en_US/screen http://ubuntu-manual.org//download/16.04/en_US/screen p. 9, it says you need 8.6 GB of disk space and in the thread I allocated 8.5 GB for my Ubuntu partition and indeed experienced serious problems which went away when I started over with a 10.0 GB partition, so you might have similar difficulties given that you only have 8 GB. This was with Zesty, not Yakkity, however.

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Community Manager
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Thank you all for your contribution on this post to help mjanofsky.

 

 

 

Best wishes,

 

 

Ivan.

 

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Novice
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Repeat%20Offender wrote:

One possible downer: in http://ubuntu-manual.org//download/16.04/en_US/screen http://ubuntu-manual.org//download/16.04/en_US/screen p. 9, it says you need 8.6 GB of disk space and in the thread /thread/109630 Attempting to dual boot Ubuntu I allocated 8.5 GB for my Ubuntu partition and indeed experienced serious problems which went away when I started over with a 10.0 GB partition, so you might have similar difficulties given that you only have 8 GB. This was with Zesty, not Yakkity, however.

Generally it is possible to install the complete OS on the µSD Card. So I installed on the Windows Version (STK1A32WFC) parallel to the preinstalled Windows 10 an openSUSE Tumbleweed on a 64GB SanDisk Ultra 64GB (UHS-I; up to 80MB/s; 533X) incl. Secure Boot (default on openSUSE). See my last comment in the following discussion:

In any case you need additional support, let me know.

https://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Tumbleweed Portal:Tumbleweed - openSUSE

Remark: Mandatory for the run of a OS on the SD-Card, is that you delete the existing partitions and create new GDT based partitions!

http://akabaila.pcug.org.au/gpt/gpt_gparted.html Installing gpt with GParted

If you install openSUSE, you should switch the installtion destination in step 2.8 with "Create Partition Setup" to the SD-Card.

https://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/leap/startup/html/book.opensuse.startup/cha.inst.html Installation with YaST | Start-Up | openSUSE Leap 42.2

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Valued Contributor II
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UbIx , I have the exact same SanDisk card and ubuntu can't see it on an STK1AW32SC! Can you divulge the secret sauce that makes it work in SUSE?

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Novice
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Hi Repeat%20Offender,

I don't know the difference, but on one hand, the openSUSE ImageWriter generates an fully (U)EFI compliant USB boot stick, including MS Signature of the bootloader and needed EFI FAT boot partition. On the other yast generates after booting and selecting the SD card as destination, a complete EFI complaint partitions.

Only needed is to enable Ubuntu as boot system in the BIOS settings. With Ubuntu we had in the last year many trouble with hardware support. In some cases a switch to mint Debian edition solve the problem. I've never trouble with openSUSE Tumbleweed, due to the fact that it based on the newest kernel!

Remark: if you have a not EFI compliant boot device, don't forget to enable legacy support in the bios settings!

About trouble with STK1AW32SC see my thread:

https://communities.intel.com/thread/109934 https://communities.intel.com/thread/109934

Today evening the replacement should arrive. I will check this again.

Which BIOS Version do you use?

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Valued Contributor II
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Same Stick (STK1AW32SC) same BIOS (0030) with zesty-desktop-alpha-281216-linuxium and neither my SanDisk Ultra PLUS microSDXC UHS-1 64 GB nor my Samsung EVO Plus microSDXC UHS-1 64 GB card works in ubuntu. Both work in Windows 10 x64. linuxium seems to have had success with a 32 GB Samsung EVO Plus, but that was last summer. Maybe it's his older BIOS or perhaps he's got a Z8300 Stick (recent Sticks like yours and mine are Z8330). Have you tried with a 32 GB Samsung EVO Plus?

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Novice
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Hi Repeat%20Offender,

I think that is not a case of the SD card. So I've tested with 32 GB Samsung PRO Plus Class 10, UHS-I, UHS-Class 3 and the above mentioned SanDisk Ultra. But in all cases this won't be detected at boot time (the Samsung includes the openSUSE Tumbleweed 64bit installed on STK1A32WFC. This works fine with this (with and w/o legacy mode in the "Ubuntu" BIOS setting). After updating the mount settings, it also works fine with the STK2m364CC. Like described in the above mentioned thread, it was anyway listed on both devices on the booteable device list below the settings. But on STK1AW32SC it nicer was listed nor the cardreader is listed in the HW info. But Ivan from intel_corp expected an HW issue. But from my point of knowledge, then I must see still the SD-Card resource in the Linux HW info, but it wasn't. So due to the fact that we have to much snow (on the roads) I think my replacement will be delayed till tomorrow. So I will retest it, the situation is still the same.

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