Intel® NUCs
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Hi frequency radiation from NUC - why?

ssyna
Beginner
1,304 Views

So not most people's theme here, but I'll post and see if Intel or someone smarter than me replies.
I'm weary of electrosmog crap, and have a very good meter to test my space with. 
I was poking around to see how much wifi bleeds through my wall from my neighbor when I inadvertently discovered that what I thought was a nearby router was actually my own dear NUC ticking away, and emitting a heavy dose of hi frequency emf pollution. 

I don't even know if my NUC has wifi built in, but if it does, it's definitely off in the windows settings. So I think that rules that out. 

The emissions start up only when the monitor and NUC fully engage, a good few seconds into booting, about when the NUC appears on screen, I think (this was a while ago, so I forget).  So not immediately when I start the NUC, in any case.
It's definitely coming from the NUC, not its power brick or that of the monitor.
It's a regular fast ticking emission and is quite strong. I wrapped the NUC very carefully in stainless shielding mesh, which is inordinately good at blocking hi frequency emissions but it was almost impossible to get rid the "noise".  I honestly don't know how it's escaping still, though I did knock the majority of it out.

So I'm just curious: what could be causing such emissions in the NUC? I tested my girlfriend's laptop, and it does nothing similar at all, from the computer or its brick. 
I'd love to hear your thoughts, if you have any. I guess the monitor factor might give someone a bit of a clue...

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20 Replies
AlHill
Super User
1,287 Views

Why don't you tell us what NUC you have, and how you measure this "radiation"?

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)

ssyna
Beginner
1,243 Views

Hi, it's an i38109U and I measure my radiation (no quotes required, it's real) with a €950 gigahertz solutions HFE35C high frequency meter (capable of very accurately reading everything from 27MHz to above 2.7 GHz).

AlHill
Super User
1,237 Views

"i38109U " is the processor model number.   Provide the NUC MODEL number.  This is important as you may have a NUC imatation.

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)

ssyna
Beginner
1,217 Views
Alberto_Sykes
Employee
1,101 Views

ssyna, Thank you for posting in the Intel® Communities Support.


In order for us to be able to provide the most accurate assistance on this matter, could you please provide a high-quality picture of the HFE35C high-frequency meter showing the levels or the measurements that you are referring to?


Any questions, please let me know.


Regards,

Albert R.


Intel Customer Support Technician


ssyna
Beginner
1,095 Views

I shall do so when I get home in a week. I will make a video and put it on youtube and give you the link here too. Maybe a megabillion euro company can buy themselves their own meter and test some NUCs in house. You should know what kind of electrofilth you are subjecting your denizens to. Some of us actually prefer not to sit in a microwave oven.

Alberto_Sykes
Employee
1,083 Views

ssyna, Thank you very much for providing that information.


Perfect, no problem at all, take your time, once you get the chance please provide the picture of the HFE35C high-frequency meter so we can further assist you with this matter.


Regards,

Albert R.


Intel Customer Support Technician


Alberto_Sykes
Employee
1,054 Views

Hell ssyna, I just wanted to check if you had the chance to send us the picture of the HFE35C high-frequency meter so we can continue providing assistance on this topic?


Regards,

Albert R.


Intel Customer Support Technician


ssyna
Beginner
1,046 Views

https://youtu.be/7Oi2U61ZIaQ
A video is worth a thousand pictures. 
The meter is measuring the average value, and because of the nature of the antenna, a reading of 3 is actually zero. The other (directional) antenna hits zero naturally.
The peak values were actually hitting 800 uW/m², which is extremely, ridiculously high.
Gigahertz tells me that the biologists who study radiation and it's health consequences consider the peak values the ones to watch. They may be short but they are intense.  ~Like being stabbed sharply every so often as opposed to slapped frequently, so to speak. Which would hurt more? 
If you think microwaves running through your body 24/7 don't have health effects, you'd better do some reading. Being numb and in denial isn't a good strategy for life. 

cell-tower-health-chart.jpg

Alberto_Sykes
Employee
984 Views

ssyna, Thank you very much for sharing those details and providing the picture.


We will do further research on this matter, as soon as I get any updates I will post all the details on this thread.


Regards,

Albert R.


Intel Customer Support Technician



saturn32
New Contributor I
969 Views

Wow, these are quite alarming news. I have the same model so I am quite concerned. I will have to stop working with the NUC until this gets clarified. 8h at least every day of a possible radiation does not sound good. 

 

Please Intel Team consider this issue as high-priority since we are not discussing about performance or troubleshooting but about health.

Thanks in advance for your time and efforts!

Best regards

J.

ssyna
Beginner
952 Views

Dunno if J is just trolling me, and I don't care if anyone makes tinfoil hat jokes, but I built myself a NUC sized Faraday cage (improvement on wrapping it up in stainless mesh) for it the other day and it knocked the radiation almost completely out. 

Ronny_G_Intel
Community Manager
906 Views

Hi ssyna,

We are looking into your report but I really need more details to get your concern properly addressed.

Can you please provide us with information about how are you measuring radiation, measuring device, procedure, readings, etc? These details may be part of your video but it is not available or set to private.

 

Thanks,

Ronny G

 

ssyna
Beginner
901 Views

Sorry if video wasn't watchable, I changed it to public. 
The video answers your questions. Only the peak readings aren't shown, just the averages. You'll have to take my word for those. 

Ronny_G_Intel
Community Manager
887 Views

Thanks, I got the video.

Let me run this issue by the Product Team and I will get back to you soon.

 

Regards,

Ronny G

YanaT_Intel
Moderator
809 Views

Hello ssyna,

Intel products and Information Communication Equipment such as the NUC8i3BEH, go through extensive testing and review to comply with all applicable global requirements (e.g., FCC & CE), including requirements for RF exposure. You can find the International Declaration of Compliance here. The RF exposure guidelines (found here) are regularly updated based on the available science, and the levels shown on your meter as well as the peak referenced in your comment are well below the RF safety requirements.

Best regards,
Yana
Intel Customer Support

ssyna
Beginner
785 Views

Well peaking at 80 times what you saw on the meter is not cool. In fact, there is no reason a PC should have to emit hi frequency radiation at all. My girlfriend's laptop doesn't do it whatsoever.
So please answer my original question instead of giving me a bull**bleep** brush-off: why is the NUC emitting this crap at all? I'm genuinely curious.
Even the average values my meter was showing are 10x what the best brains on the subject in europe recommend as relatively benign (100x what they recommend for sleeping in).
So the peaks I read near the NUC are 800 times what they say one should be hanging out in, even in daytime, and 8000 what they say is healthy for sleeping in. Not exactly nothing.
I don't know what your guidelines are, but given that the general consensus for cell phones and all that dreck is pretty much literally "if it isn't heating up your brain, it's fine", your tests are highly likely to be worthless and pure greenwashing.

saturn32
New Contributor I
726 Views

Well, to be honest I kind of expected a better answer too. Its such a pity, I though I found a PC to stuck with forever, to let it run 24/7. But it feels a bit weird now, specially with kids at home.

 

@ssyna have u maybe different NUC units to check the radiation or different PCs to get an idea how widespread this is?

 

YanaT_Intel
Moderator
695 Views

Hello ssyna,

To answer the original question “why is this NUC emitting anything at all”:

All electronic devices emit RF energy, and they all must be tested and found to be at or below the scientifically derived and government-approved limits to mitigate interference and protect the public prior to being placed on the market. The Declaration of Conformity (found here) indicates the standards and regulations and shows the device was assessed and within compliance.

The RF exposure limits are based on a comprehensive review of scientific studies and regularly reviewed and approved by national and international regulatory and health agencies. In the US, it is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Food Drug Administration (FDA), who regularly review the scientific literature to ensure the limits continue to protect the public. Similarly, in the EU, it is the European Commission along with the regulatory agencies in the respective Member State countries which use international standards and guidelines developed by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). 

In a 2020 Q&A by the World Health Organization, the agency states: “To date, and after much research performed, no adverse health effect has been causally linked with exposure to wireless technologies.”

Intel’s products are designed and tested to comply with these requirements before they are placed on the market. The levels you reported are well within the limits approved by national and international regulatory and health agencies.

Finally, Intel does not set the RF exposure limits. If you have questions about the limits themselves, it is best to refer to the regulations and guidance from the applicable regulatory and public health agency within your country.

Best Regards, 

Intel Customer Support

ssyna
Beginner
230 Views

So, I started to guess that the EMF filth is coming from the pwm fan, and I was right. I just put the NUC in a fanless Akasa Turing case (wonderful, and cooler than with fan), and the HF pollution is totally gone. 
Beware those crappy pwm fans if you're sensitive to emf crap.

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