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I noticed in the bios (NUC8I5BEH3) there was no cpu temperature but something called VR temperature. What is this VR temperature? Is it the same as cpu temperature?

fadsarmy
Beginner
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16 Replies
LeonWaksman
Super User
980 Views

The components that the sensors monitor include memory (RAM), processor (CPU), platform control hub (PCH), and voltage regulator (VR). VR temperature, means Voltage Regulator temperature. For more complete explanation, please read here: https://sites.google.com/site/visualbios/advanced/cooling/temperatures

 

Leon

 

YADAM
Beginner
980 Views

Thank you for your reply but mine monitors:

 

[img]https://i.imgur.com/aPNrCbL.jpg[/img]

LeonWaksman
Super User
980 Views

Now I understand better your question. On the left panel, near the temperature graph, you can see label marked VR temperature (which means Voltage Regulator temperature), however on the R.H side panel, there is not possibility to chose VR temperature sensor. VR temperature sensor measures temperature on Voltage Regulator, while Processor Temperature Sensor measures temperature on CPU core (which is other place). Probably there is an error in the bios label, which should be CPU temperature, rather than VR temperature.

Wait for confirmation from Intel's agent. He will probably answer on Monday.

 

Leon

Wanner_G_Intel
Moderator
980 Views
Hello fadsarmy and YADAM, Please provide a picture of the BIOS setting/parameter in question. The link posted above is broken. Wanner G. Intel Customer Support Technician Under Contract to Intel Corporation
fadsarmy
Beginner
980 Views

Sorry about that. Here we are:

 

[img]https://i.imgur.com/3WNs443.jpg[/img]

 

Wanner_G_Intel
Moderator
980 Views
Hello fadsarmy, Thank you for your response. We will get back to you soon. Wanner G. Intel Customer Support Technician Under Contract to Intel Corporation
Wanner_G_Intel
Moderator
980 Views
Hello fadsarmy, As discussed on this thread, the voltage regulator (VR) is responsible for regulating the power lanes that feed power to the different hardware components on the motherboard. The temperature sensor is located in the VR area that monitors the temperature of the surrounding components. Now, settings in BIOS may vary depending on your Intel® NUC model, the hardware components installed, and the BIOS version. For this specific unit, the BIOS settings you have access to are correct and updating BIOS (0064) does not modify them. We would like to add that you can also use the following Diagnostic and Performance Tools for the Intel® NUC. Diagnostic and Performance Tools for the Intel® NUC https://www.intel.ca/content/www/ca/en/support/articles/000024102/mini-pcs.html Wanner G. Intel Customer Support Technician Under Contract to Intel Corporation
fadsarmy
Beginner
980 Views

Thank you for the reply. Are you telling me there is no cpu temperature reading in the bios?

Wanner_G_Intel
Moderator
980 Views
Hello fadsarmy, There is currently no BIOS option that displays the CPU temperature for Intel® NUC Kit NUC8i5BEH. We recommend using the Intel® Processor Diagnostic Tool and third-party test and diagnostic tools and software to monitor temperature. Wanner G. Intel Customer Support Technician Under Contract to Intel Corporation
fadsarmy
Beginner
980 Views

Hello,

 

Well that is shocking.

LeonWaksman
Super User
980 Views

Hi @fadsarmy​ 

Don't be shocked. This reading is not important as you think. As I've wrote you VR means in this case Voltage Regulator. I still think that this is an error in bios label and the temperature shown is for CPU (I can't be sure, since I don't have NUC8i5BEH). Any way any temperature reading shown in bios is not indicative for the temperatures under the O.S. regime with real load. So better download free application, for example HWMonitor https://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html and you will be able monitor you NUC during operation.

 

Leon

 

fadsarmy
Beginner
980 Views

There is no cpu temp in bios. I always knew what VR Temp was but I was so surprised that cpu temp was absent, I though maybe Intel found a new name for it. They have silly things like memory temp but no cpu temp. Shocking, unbelievable.

LeonWaksman
Super User
980 Views

However in the subject you wrote: "What is this VR temperature? Is it the same as cpu temperature?" 😊

 

Leon

fadsarmy
Beginner
980 Views

Well I was so shocked that maybe Intel call the cpu temp vr temp or they labelled it wrong. Can't put anything past Intel with them leaving the cpu temp out. BTW, it's one noisy unit.

fadsarmy
Beginner
980 Views

You're starting to irritate me.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
616 Views

The BE board monitors five (5) temperature sensors, Processor Temperature, PCH Temperature, VR Temperature, Memory Temperature and Motherboard Temperature. The VR, Memory and Motherboard temperatures are measured using thermal diodes placed in specific locations on the board. In this case, they are located next to the VRM, below the SODIMMs and below the M.2 SSD. The Motherboard Temperature sensor is best sensor to use to measure whether there is sufficient airflow over the board's lower surface. It and the sensor in the M.2 SSD (exposed via S.M.A.R.T.) should be used together to determine whether M.2 SSD is receiving sufficient cooling. Aside: Because of the thermal foam placed against the top of the M.2 SSD (and which is being used to dissipate the heat from the M.2 SSD into the chassis (K units) or drive bay (H units) metal), the air flowing over the surface of the board ends up being funneled under the M.2 SSD and over the thermal diode. Hence its importance.

As for the BE BIOS, its sensor display (incorrectly, I agree) does not include the Processor Temperature in the graphs displayed. You will note, however, that the Processor Temperature is the default selection for Primary Temperature for fan speed control (as it should be). As I said, the best selection for Secondary Temperature is the Motherboard Temperature sensor. Aside: I agree that 'Motherboard Temperature' is not the most elegant of names, but it is measuring the (Mother)board temperature in an important location.

...S

P.S. Note that the Processor (once they fix the BIOS), PCH and VR temperatures displayed within Visual BIOS should not be used to determine temperature coefficients for fan speed control. While running Visual BIOS, all power management features of the processor are disabled and thus temperatures will be higher than what you will see in runtime environments.

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