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Beginner
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NUC10 display settings not persistent

NUC BXNUC10I7FNK1 running Linux, Debian Sid.  The display resets to 3480x2160@60Hz every time it comes back to the monitor.  That refresh rate won't work, and the display keeps blanking/returning quickly, and I have to run the display settings and change the display in between blanks.  I reset it to 2560x1440 and all is fine until either the display times out or I switch to another computer connected to the same display, and when I come back to it, it's always the same.  I cannot force the NUC to keep the last display settings.  I have the latest firmware from the Sid repositories, but perhaps there is another firmware package that I need, although I don't see any obvious candidates.  Is there a way to get the NUC to save display settings?

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Beginner
180 Views

Or is there a way to force 30Hz refresh rate when the resolution is 3480x2160?  That would be sufficient, I can deal with changing the resolution if the flashing/intermittent display can be done away with.  I also get it during the shutdown and startup screens, with just ASCII text display.  The default display parameters just seem to be wrong.

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Super User Retired Employee
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Do you have the NUC configured to use S3 for Sleep? I wonder if the issue is caused by the Modern Standby stuff???

...S

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Beginner
162 Views

I found an acceptable solution.  The display settings applet in Xfce has a setting under the Advanced tab that forces reconfiguring the resolution/dimensions through a profile.  That had not worked correctly before, but when I redid it with a new profile, it now restores the settings whenever I come back to the NUC. in an X session.  The display is still wrong during boot and shutdown, with the 60Hz refresh rate and jitters/blanking, but I can live with it as long as it's stable in use.  I would like to see the ability to force a 30Hz refresh rate, or a lower resolution, at all times, but it's not absolutely essential.  It has nothing to do with sleep, it's just that the NUC automatically uses the maximum resolution for the monitor, without regard to the refresh rate, until it's changed by software.  Perhaps a kernel boot command, but I suspect there are no Linux users here so I'm not expecting much input in that area.

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Beginner
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My saga continues.  I can maintain desktop settings, but the boot issue is annoying.  During boot, the monitor just displays "No signal detected".  I have to blindly enter my LVM password, then my username and user password, then the desktop comes up.  This is with the KVM switch in the chain.  WIthout the KVM switch, I can see the login display and prompts, although the resolution changes along the way, and I still get the 3280x2160x60 display, which is unstable.  I've mucked around with grub and kernel command line options without success.  I really need a pointer to a method to force the NUC to output a different display setting during boot.  My search foo appears to be weak on this subject.

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Moderator
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Hello sgosnell,


Thank you for posting on the Intel* Community.


I need to inform you that Intel has not tested and validated this Intel NUC model with any Linux distribution; however, we have plenty of positive reports from customers that are using the unit successfully on many different Linux distros.


You can check the Intel Compatibility Tool for the NUC model in case you are interested.


This seems to be a compatibility issue or lack of graphics drivers on your system, most Linux-based* distributions include Intel® Graphics Drivers. These drivers are provided and maintained by the Linux* distribution vendors. Contact your operating system vendor (OSV) and use their distribution for driver access and support.



Best regards,

Maria R. 

Intel Customer Support Technician


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Beginner
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Intel/Mesa graphics drivers are in Linux, and I have the latest installed.  I just need a way to get the NUC to use them at boot time.  It won't send a usable video signal to the monitor until the graphics system starts, after which it works fine.  The graphics drivers should be in the Linux kernel, but perhaps the 10th gen CPU requires different ones which haven't been provided to the Linux kernel yet. 

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Super User Retired Employee
122 Views

It is certainly possible that the driver is not yet a native part of the kernel for your distribution. You need to be talking to the distribution owners regarding this. 

...S

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Beginner
115 Views

I have the latest stable Linux kernel installed.  The only thing newer are the release candidates for the next version, and I don't want those.  The Linux kernel relies on Intel to provide the drivers for the kernel.  One would think that the 10th gen CPU has been released long enough for the drivers to be provided to the Linux kernel maintainers.  But one might be wrong, I don't know.  Perhaps it's a configuration issue, or something else.  That's what I'm trying to figure out.

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Super User Retired Employee
68 Views

I have seen it take 6 months (yes, months) before all of the distros will have the latest drivers merged into their code base. Intel makes the drivers available at or before hardware launch. After that, is it up to the distro managers to make the latest drivers available. Now, some do this via updates, so you don't have to wait for a new build release; you should check into those.

...S

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Beginner
65 Views

It's not necessary to wait for the distro.  The latest kernel is always available at kernel.org, as well as other places. 

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Super User Retired Employee
40 Views

Then you know what to do.

...S

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