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DCarg1
Beginner
492 Views

NUC8i5BEH. Could not use the Ctrl i sequence to set up raid until I unchecked UEFI boot. This is not in the Intel instructions.

Is this the correct procedure to set up raid?​  Should I re-check UEFI boot before installing Windows.

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15 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
101 Views

Ctrl-I is not supported when using UEFI. In BIOS Setup, (re-)enable UEFI and RAID and then reboot. When the BIOS POST Splash Screen appears, use the F2 key to again enter BIOS Setup. Now click on Advanced, then Devices and then on the Add-in Config tab. You should see an entry that allows you to immediately invoke the Intel RST BIOS extension.

 

Hope this helps,

...S

DCarg1
Beginner
101 Views

Thanks Scott. I see this now. Since I have the drives setup in the Legacy MBR mode via the legacy Ctrl i, should I delete the raid in this mode?

FYI: This is the Intel page that led me down this path.

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000021493/mini-pcs/intel-nuc-kits.html?prod... 

Go the the bottom of the page and select SATA.  

LeonWaksman
Super User
101 Views

@DCarg1​ 

You should be aware that since your NUC is equipped with one M.2 slot (with PCIe and SATA interface) and HDD bay with SATA interface, only SATA (AHCI)RAID mode is supported. The RAID is supported on your NUC only if the SSD installed in M.2 slot have SATA interface (rather then NVME).

Both drives need to be either AHCI (SATA) or NVMe (PCIe). The two technologies can't be mixed.

 

Leon

 

 

DCarg1
Beginner
101 Views

Leon---I am perfectly aware of that. See my post above yours. Now, as to my question put another way. Can my SATA SSD's be configured in raid using the UEFI method instead of the MBR legacy method? If so, should I un-do the Legacy raid mode and start over only using the UEFI.

Read the link I provided and you will see my confusion.

 

Thanks.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
101 Views

As far as I know, you shouldn't need to. In theory, what the firmware does is the same in both modes; only the interface to this firmware is different.

...S

LeonWaksman
Super User
101 Views

Hi @DCarg1​ 

  1. I've have never configured computer to use RAID. After reading the linked procedure I'm confused also. One may understand that if you are using SATA drive, you should configure RAID, using SATA(AHCI)RAID method. However, after reading again, I came to conclusion that SATA(AHCI)RAID method is only one of two possible options. If you want to use the second option (SATA(NVMe)RAID), you should assure that the UEMI boot is enabled. The final result will be the same. As I've wrote, this only my understanding.
  2. If you want, you may wait for confirmation from Intel engineer. Probably he will answer tomorrow.
  3. If this was my computer, since I prefer the UEFI interface, I would make test. That means, after setting the Bios to default setting (F9), which enables the UEFI boot, I would try to configure RAID with the SATA(NVMe)RAID. Next, the Windows should be installed with UEFI boot and UEFI partition. This is not long process, therefore I would try. And yes, if you decide to this, better to un-do SATA(AHCI)RAID first.

 

Leon

 

DCarg1
Beginner
101 Views

Leon, Thanks for confirming the steps on what I think I should do. I hope an Intel Engineer will answer and can clear this up. Its possible the info in the link I posted above for setting up raid is outdated, or at least not for NUC 8's. There is also very little on the net about setting up raid that is current. Most dates to 2016 or farther back. Someone needs to do an in-depth article about raid with current technologies addressing SSD SATA, NVMe, UEFI, GPT, Trim and probably more.

 

 

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
101 Views

What do you need cleared up? As a general statement, RAID is supported on two (or more) NVMe drives (presuming the BIOS supports NVMe redirection) or two of more SATA devices (but only those on chipset SATA connectors; those on connectors for secondary SATA controllers are not supported). You cannot set up RAID on a mixed set of devices; they must be all NVMe or all SATA.

 

...S

LeonWaksman
Super User
101 Views

Hi @DCarg1​ 

I'm attaching link to review on RAID configuration in Hades Canyon. This computer has two M.2 slots. However, in this review the author tested two kinds of RAID: SATA and NVMe. He used the UEMI method for configuration in both tests. Also the benchmark result may be of interest for you https://techsterweb.com/2018/08/27/hades-disks/

 

Leon

 

LeonWaksman
Super User
101 Views

Hi Scott,

  1. Following this Intel instructions https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000021493/mini-pcs/intel-nuc-kits.html?prod..., in SATA(AHCI)RAID part, there is no mention that in order to use this procedure (Ctrl +I), the UEFI boot should be disabled. As you understand, @DCarg1​  wants to leave UEFI boot enabled for Windows 10 installation.
  2. The other part of Intel procedure (named PCIe(NVMe)RAID), doesn't explains that using this method (i.e. with UEFI boot enabled), SATA drives may be configured for RAID.
  3. So, what's confusing @DCarg1​  and also me, are the incomplete and misleading instructions. It should be clearly stated that when using SATA(AHCI)RAID, the UEFI boot should be disabled and that both method are good for both type of drives (i.e. SATA or NVMe). In addition, should be added that for Windows 10 installation, the PCIe(NVMe)RAID method should be used, since the UEFI boot is enabled.
  4. Am I wrong?

 

Leon

 

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
101 Views

Leon, I do not believe that the situation is correctly represented in that document and thus is making this confusing. Here is what I believe is the case:

 

  1. Doing anything with NVMe drives absolutely requires that UEFI be enabled. This is not the case for SATA drives, however. You can enable or disable UEFI, whichever you wish. I personally believe that UEFI should always be enabled (and used).
  2. Whether you are working with NVMe drives or SATA drives has absolutely no bearing on how you invoke Intel RST...
    1. If you have UEFI disabled, you will use the Legacy Option ROM (OpROM) for Intel RST to create/maintain your RAID array(s). You will invoke this Legacy OpROM using the CTRL-I sequence during the BIOS POST process.
    2. If you have UEFI enabled, you will use the UEFI OpROM for Intel RST to create/maintain your RAID array(s). You will invoke this UEFI OpROM from the Add-In Config tab in the Advanced / Devices section of BIOS Setup (Visual BIOS).
  3. All NUCs have the ability to host a RAID array containing two SATA drives. Only a select few can host a RAID array containing two NVMe SSDs...
    1. In most NUC models, it is only possible to support a RAID array containing two SATA drives. This requires the use of a M.2 SATA SSD and a 2.5" SATA drive.
    2. In the Skull Canyon (NUC7i7KYK) and Hades Canyon (NUC8i7HNK/NUC8i7HVK) NUCs, you can create a RAID array containing two M.2 NVMe SSDs or two M.2 SATA SSDs. To use two M.2 NVMe SSDs, you must also enable PCIe Storage Remapping for both SSDs. Mixing of drives is not supported. That is, you cannot create an array that contains a M.2 NVMe SSD and a M.2 SATA SSD.

 

I will run an experiment to verify this sometime tomorrow; it is 11:30 pm here and I am off to bed. Feel free to attempt this yourself if you wish an answer sooner.

...S

LeonWaksman
Super User
101 Views

Hi Scott,

You will read my post on Tuesday. Thank you for your response. As you see those were my assumptions also. Assumptions only, since I have not suitable equipment at home to verify this in test. You can see now that Intel Instructions are not complete and are confusing. This document should be updated.

Please confirm that in order to configure RAID, using the first method (i.e. SATA(AHCI)RAID), UEFI boot have to be disabled (in contradiction to the second method).

 

Regards

Leon

 

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
101 Views

No, I believe the opposite should be the case; the state of UEFI boot should determine which method of invocation (CTRL-I for Legacy OpROM vs. BIOS Setup Add-In Config for UEFI OpROM) will be provided. Whether the target is SATA RAID or NVMe RAID shouldn't matter. [Of course, I am using logic here and, well, reality bites.]

 

Getting the hardware together to test this is taking me some time. Unfortunately, my SATA-based M.2 drives are all currently in use and what spares I have are all NVMe...

...S

 

DCarg1
Beginner
101 Views

Leon and Scott,

Taking some clues from your answers above, I went into Bios and deleted my Legacy Raid with the Control i method. I then saved, exited and entered the Bios again, unchecked legacy boot, and checked UEFI boot, went into "Add in config", and then RST config and successfully configured UEFI RAID 1, saved and exit, then loaded Windows10 Pro successfully. Windows Disk Manager confirms a successful raid with GPT partitioning as I want. The only thing I could not do was add the RST driver in the Windows setup "add drivers" just before Windows loads. The USB drive with the RST files showed up, but no files show, just the disk. I had the latest RST zip file as well as the .exe. on the drive. So I just bypassed doing this load. Now that Windows is loaded and working, I am assuming I should load the RST.exe file now after the fact. Is this correct? Now that Windows is loaded I do see both the files on my USB drive.

 

Thanks,

 

D

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
101 Views

Yes, I would load it now. You will want it for monitoring, if nothing else.

...S​

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