Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
ssmit23
Beginner
1,179 Views

Regarding Supported Device list and Average turn around for repairs

Jump to solution

Hello there everyone I have two queries I am hopping i can find the answer for here. I am really interested buying the Intel® NUC Kit NUC8i7HVK

1. in the 2x8gb ram configuration I cannot find any for sale that are in stock within Australia (Victoria) that are supported, Am I better off to import one from the device list or will the Corsair CMSX16GX4M2A2400C16 (2400mhz 1.2v) function? I would prefer to purchase within Australia. The 1 TB SSD 2280 by WD is supported, would there be any reason the 2TB version would not work?

 

2. As I will depend on this NUC for work related tasks with the adobe suite, if for the unfortunate reason this unit is in need of repair or is faulty, what is the average turn around time for a unit to be fixed and sent back? I do heavy work loads so using a random computer as a temp may not cut it.

Thanks in advance to anyone with advice, I really do like the idea of heavily compacted desktop, seems to be a good solution between a laptop and desktop.

0 Kudos

Accepted Solutions
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
42 Views
  1. I see nothing obvious that would prevent these SODIMMs from being used. They are just one speed level below other Corsair SODIMMs that have been validated.
  2. Both the WD Blue 1TB M.2 SATA SSD (WDS100T2B0B) and the WD Black 1TB M.2 NVMe SSD (WDS100T2X0C) should be supported without issue. Obviously, the WD Black series offers the better performance (albeit at a much higher cost).
  3. If your unit becomes faulty, you can have it replaced through the place of purchase (where possible) or via Intel's RMA process. The RMA process requires the return of the unit to Intel (you keep the storage and memory devices that you had added). Once it is received by Intel, they will ship a replacement unit back to you immediately. How long this will take is dependent upon your location with respect to the closest RMA center. Once you get the replacement unit, you install your storage and memory, configure the BIOS, boot into Windows, reactivate Windows and you will then, in theory, be back where you were at the point of failure.

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post

2 Replies
ssmit23
Beginner
42 Views

Sorry couldn't see if there was an edit button, but I did find single sticks at 2666 on the list, just going to buy 2 of them (

BLS16G4S26BFSD.1

6BFD)

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
43 Views
  1. I see nothing obvious that would prevent these SODIMMs from being used. They are just one speed level below other Corsair SODIMMs that have been validated.
  2. Both the WD Blue 1TB M.2 SATA SSD (WDS100T2B0B) and the WD Black 1TB M.2 NVMe SSD (WDS100T2X0C) should be supported without issue. Obviously, the WD Black series offers the better performance (albeit at a much higher cost).
  3. If your unit becomes faulty, you can have it replaced through the place of purchase (where possible) or via Intel's RMA process. The RMA process requires the return of the unit to Intel (you keep the storage and memory devices that you had added). Once it is received by Intel, they will ship a replacement unit back to you immediately. How long this will take is dependent upon your location with respect to the closest RMA center. Once you get the replacement unit, you install your storage and memory, configure the BIOS, boot into Windows, reactivate Windows and you will then, in theory, be back where you were at the point of failure.

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post