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manufacturing and design defect on all NUCs or obsolescence programmed by INTEL on all NUCs ????

eric-fr-75005
Beginner
292 Views

Hello

good year 2021 !

Security breach at INTEL all NUC and
I don't want to grill I repeat to grill either my very expensive TERA 2 SSD 
and the very expensive NUC10i7 or worse both at the same time even worse.
also it happened on my NUC6i5


I have a small intel NUC6i5 and I want to switch to a large high NUC10i7FNH2
or there is a design flaw on the 2 models and all the NUCs even

let me explain
the WIFI bluetooth card heats the ssd disk ma 2 crucial mx500 without radiator
and vice versa
the disk heats up the wifi card so my BLUETTOTH wifi card has burned out
and it becomes unsaleable or almost

future solution buy a radiator for ssd M2 I plan to buy a ssd of 2 (two) tera
and given
1 of the price of the NUC10i7
and 2 of the price of the 2 tera ssd disc
I do not intend to grill one of the 2 either the sdd or the NUC solution ??????

that you offer yourself if it is guaranteed for 3 years ???

question which radiators would be suitable?
what is the model that covers the flat DOS of the ssd?
what is the height limit of the radiator possible?
would this 25mm model be suitable
https://www.amazon.fr/gp/product/B07WPY7N1F/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A1U1LUI1JKC2DF&psc=1 thank you for your confirmation cordially eric

Thank you for your advice
cordially
Eric

 

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1 Solution
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
262 Views

So let me address this bit by bit...

First of all, I do not believe for even a second that the M.2 SSD had anything to do with the failure of your Wireless card.

  1. M.2 SSDs are single-sided cards. Little heat is transferred to the blank side of the card.
  2. A thermal pad is used to transfer heat from the M.2 SSD into the bottom plate of the NUC. It is then dissipated from there using the large surface area of this plate.
  3. The NUC's airflow pattern pulls air across the bottom surface of the motherboard. Because the thermal pad blocks airflow over the M.2 SSD, the air is forced to go under the M.2 SSD and thus over the Wireless card. This further prevents any heat from the M.2 SSD affecting the Wireless card.

In the design of the taller H chassis, the thermal pad instead transfers heat into the metal mass of the SATA drive bay. It is similarly dissipated from there using the large surface area of this bay.

Because of this design, no heatsink is necessary on the M.2 SSD (though a thin heat spreader will improve heat transfer to the thermal pad). Also, as a result of this design, there is no room for any heatsink (or radiator) to be attached to the M.2 SSD. Having even a thin heatsink could, in fact, result in poorer cooling of the M.2 SSD. Why? Because as the thermal pad is compressed, its ability to transfer heat is reduced.

Having a heatsink (or radiator) of any substantial thickness would require hacking the chassis. This would, of course, void your warranty.

...S

 

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2 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
263 Views

So let me address this bit by bit...

First of all, I do not believe for even a second that the M.2 SSD had anything to do with the failure of your Wireless card.

  1. M.2 SSDs are single-sided cards. Little heat is transferred to the blank side of the card.
  2. A thermal pad is used to transfer heat from the M.2 SSD into the bottom plate of the NUC. It is then dissipated from there using the large surface area of this plate.
  3. The NUC's airflow pattern pulls air across the bottom surface of the motherboard. Because the thermal pad blocks airflow over the M.2 SSD, the air is forced to go under the M.2 SSD and thus over the Wireless card. This further prevents any heat from the M.2 SSD affecting the Wireless card.

In the design of the taller H chassis, the thermal pad instead transfers heat into the metal mass of the SATA drive bay. It is similarly dissipated from there using the large surface area of this bay.

Because of this design, no heatsink is necessary on the M.2 SSD (though a thin heat spreader will improve heat transfer to the thermal pad). Also, as a result of this design, there is no room for any heatsink (or radiator) to be attached to the M.2 SSD. Having even a thin heatsink could, in fact, result in poorer cooling of the M.2 SSD. Why? Because as the thermal pad is compressed, its ability to transfer heat is reduced.

Having a heatsink (or radiator) of any substantial thickness would require hacking the chassis. This would, of course, void your warranty.

...S

 

View solution in original post

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
212 Views

I will address your response in the other (closed) thread.

Re: "but all this is theory and nice "design" phrases to me. IN PRACTICE, the m2 ssd disk heats up especially when compressing video for example the wifi card also heats up due to the microwave emission."

--> No, this is not all just theory; it was specifically designed to address these issues (and many others) and models were developed to test them. It is certainly true that the SSD and (to a much, much smaller extent) the WiFi card will indeed generate heat during usage. As I said, the NUC was designed to extract as much of the heat that is being generated as possible and dissipate it through the chassis. This helps prevent this heat from causing throttling in the SSD (yes, they do that) and from disaffecting any  other circuitry. As I also said, the airflow design of the NUCs is such that it specifically extracts the heat generated in the WiFi componentry. 

Re: "According to your theory I do not see why then on the high-end ssd m2 2280 the radiators are supplied with? I don't see why other manufacturers are selling radiators? it is useless according to your theory?"

--> It is very simple: In standard desktop designs, there is nothing other than the passive airflow over the motherboard to dissipate the heat generated in the SSDs. The net result is overheating and throttling SSDs. While a few motherboards now ship with heatsinks to put on top of these SSDs, most ship with nothing and the SSD manufacturers themselves were forced to supply them.

...S

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