Intel® Optane™ Solid State Drives
Support for Issues Related to Solid State Drives based on Intel® Optane™ technology, Intel® MAS and Firmware Update Tool
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idohow
Beginner
1,298 Views

hey,

i'm getting a notification that one of my disks is at risk. (intel optane memory and storage management)

what should i do? my computer is new and used only for university study.

 

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5 Replies
idohow
Beginner
1,278 Views

thank you for the help!

but i still don't understand what i need to do? it says that my disk is at risk and i don't want it to fail or somthing of that matter.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
1,256 Views

The recommended message from the S.M.A.R.T. Specification says it all: "WARNING: Immediately back-up your data and replace your [hard disk] drive. A failure may be imminent."

You could run a tool (like AIDA64) that can display the individual S.M.A.R.T. attributes. This would allow you (or us) to determine why the drive's failure is being predicted.

...S

Neophyte-A0
Novice
606 Views

Or your SSD is hot and wants more cooling I have been puzzling about the lack of documentation for these marvelous devices since I bought one for a new build and have been beating the weeds of the internet to find out how to properly install any cooling without pealing off the warranty void if removed sticker so the thermal tape solution can be applied to the chips which are the operating(hot) part right?

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
598 Views

Actually, most of today's SSDs can sustain fairly high temperatures (80c) and will protect themselves by throttling performance if they start to get too hot. External and Internal 2.5" SSDs utilize their own chassis to dissipate the excess heat.

Many designs (laptops, all-in-ones, Intel's NUC devices, etc.) include thermal pads that press against the M.2 SATA/NVMe SSDs when the system is properly closed up and will allow the heat from these SSDs to be dissipated through the chassis (and keyboards in some laptops). These are aided by the heat spreaders that are included with most M.2 SSDs (never forget to put them on).

In desktop designs, where the chassis is not available for heat dissipation, some motherboard manufacturers have resorted to including heatsinks to help dissipate the heat. In the future, this might not be as feasible: here's an article regarding this: The SSDs Of The Future Will Be So Fast, They Might Need Active Fans.

Hope this helps,

...S

Neophyte-A0
Novice
591 Views

Same symptoms what's the difference between thermal throttling and you need to turn the thing down in a few 50 or 60k  notches in that bios thing I'm hoping I can return mine bleeding edge tech is risky if it is flirting with thermal limits during " normal" use figure out how to reduce the bucket count or rate and make it use less current

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