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Beginner
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uninstall Intel OpenCL

I wish to use OpenCL runtime for nVidia GPUs.  This Windows10 machine already has IntelOpenCL32.dll and it appears to conflict with the nVidia runtime.  How do I UNINSTALL the Intel OpenCL runtime?

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Beginner
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A friend of mine with the same problem decided  to reinstall windows and all of the updates and all of his software.  That's a terrible way to have to do it.

Does that mean that IntelOpenCL is virus-like (causing a problem which cannot be reasonably repaired) or does this forum simply fail to support it because nobody knows how to remove it once it's installed?

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Employee
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Hello,

The mechanism to uninstall the Intel CPU OpenCL implementation (IntelOpenCLXX.dll) will depend how it was installed.  Do you happen to know how your Intel CPU OpenCL implementation was installed?  Have you checked for OpenCL uninstaller entries in "Add or Remove Programs"?

Note that OpenCL is designed to support multiple implementations from multiple vendors simultaneously, so there is no need to uninstall the Intel CPU OpenCL implementation to use an OpenCL implementation from another vendor if you are not experiencing problems.  Do note that you may need to modify your application slightly if it is not choosing the desired OpenCL platform by default.

One other option to consider is to consider is to disable (vs. uninstall) an OpenCL implementation via ICD loader registry keys.  I described the mechanism to do this in another forum thread, here:

https://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/opencl/topic/705036

As mentioned on the other forum thread, the nice thing about this method is that it's easy to re-enable if you change your mind or want to experiment with different OpenCL implementations.

Hope this helps!

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Hi BruceB,

*edit*Response in flight just as BruceB updated the thread... but let's add this here because hopefully we can expand the context for a healthy solution...

Comments on installation methods:

An OEM or system vendor may repackage an this OpenCL runtime as part of their graphics driver package. So a vendor provided system may come with a graphics driver installer that deploys the runtimes. Typically these drivers would provide the latest vendor supported deployments and would be newer than prebaked installs that are distributed with Windows. The vendor may provide an install/uninstall mechanism via Windows OS add or remove programs dialog.

The graphics driver, and thus OpenCL implementations, may be available from downloadcenter.intel.com in the Graphics area. There are packages that match each system. On a skylake based system with Intel graphics based system I used this installer... I can see and use this uninstall dialog:

20190426_install-uninstall.png

 

Driver packages obtained from downloadcenter.intel.com may not be supported by the vendor... so users should opt for vendor provided driver packages for support concerns.

Windows 10 OS may come predeployed with OpenCL runtimes for Intel devices. In particular, if at install time Windows 10 OS sees a capable processor with Intel Graphics hardware it will look to deploy preincluded runtimes itself. Of course, this runtime would could only be as recent as the distribution of Windows OS itself... So obtaining the runtimes via one of the other two options is typically more up to date.


Comments on the apparent conflict:

A software application uses the opencl interface to interrogate the system for opencl platforms. It's possible a software application does not enumerate consistently with multiple platforms available or has a logic issue. clinfo, available here, does a pretty consistent job of enumerating and reporting platform information. Using clinfo could be useful feedback to resolve your conflict. Also, if you have your own software that performs interrogation, and it is not privileged, the relevant code snippet can be posted to the forum for review.

Can you share where the apparent conflict is? With what application? It could be useful to clarify and if necessary file the conflict to OpenCL implementation teams in Intel.

 

To BenA's comments on ICD loader registry keys...:

BenA has some good walkthrough instructions... But for those who may have similar concerns and are looking for more documentation on  registry expectations: Here is the Khronos reference on expectations for where to find those keys and how OpenCL platform installers keep or update those keys.

 

Thanks for the interest and feedback,

 

-MichaelC

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BruceB had commented on the thread here.

 

-MichaelC

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Beginner
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We are talking about two entirely different issues

1) When I install software on a new Intel computer, I plug my monitor into the video connector that that connects to the Integrated GPU on the motherboard.  (7th generation or better, Iris/HD Graphics).  That device can run OpenCL when using the software we've been talking about.

2) If I'm a gamer or want VR or for a number of other reasons, I may choose to to purchase a Discrete GPU and plug it into a PCIe slot.(typically containing GPU hardware from NVidia or from ATI/AMD.  Once I do that, the iGPU no longer functions and I have to plug the monitor directly into the dGPU.  I presume the BIOS prevents both video devices from working at the same time. **  At that time, OpenCL also stops working because the IntelOpenCL sofware assumes that the system contains a functional Intel GPU -- but it no longer does.  I must then install a version of OpenCL that recognizes the dGPU.

In my case, the default OpenCL fails to work... even if I have installed OpenCL from another source.  The instructions to edit the registry do work, but I don't understand why I should have to do that.  Inasmuch as there is no longer an Intel iGPU. the software should be smart enough to disable itself -- removing the default setting and enabling the newly installed OpenCL software as the new default.

** If anybody knows how to enable multiscrene video using both the iPGU and the dGPU simultaneously, let me know.  I suppose that setting would be in the BIOS, but I have not found it.

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Employee
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Borden, bruce wrote:

At that time, OpenCL also stops working because the IntelOpenCL sofware assumes that the system contains a functional Intel GPU -- but it no longer does.  I must then install a version of OpenCL that recognizes the dGPU.

Hi Bruce, could you include a stack trace when the error occurs?  Which driver version are you using?  If it's not the latest version, could you update?

Our implementation should correctly recognize that the iGPU is no longer available and fail gracefully, but it's possible there is a bug.

If you could provide steps to reproduce that would be helpful, too.

Borden, bruce wrote:

** If anybody knows how to enable multiscrene video using both the iPGU and the dGPU simultaneously, let me know.  I suppose that setting would be in the BIOS, but I have not found it.

This sounds right, the BIOS is the first place to check, but unfortunately not all BIOS vendors provide this capability.

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