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PShek
Beginner
1,655 Views

BIOS update and older quad core processors

I just updated my BIOS from the update found on the Intel drivers section. After the update my processor heats up to 97C while idle in the BIOS screen.

The only way to run the computer at all is to disable all enhancing options, run on 1 core only, and set the CPU fan to work on 80-100% speed at all times. The temperature is still not low (55-60C) when running windows with minimal applications running.

I've already cleaned and reapplied thermal paste.

Is there a compatibility problem between the new update and older processors?

What should I do with this issue?

Mother board - Intel DBZ6810H

Running BIOS update - Intel Corp. DBZ6810H.86A.0047.2018.0409.1733, 09-Apr-18

Processor - Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2600K CPU @ 3.40GHz, 3392 Mhz (right now running 1 core)

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11 Replies
AlHill
Super User
151 Views

PShek
Beginner
151 Views

It's the DZB68DB.

Windows 10, 64bit, build 17134.228

The CPU is hot in the BIOS screen as well, so I'm not sure the windows version has anything to do with it.

AlHill
Super User
151 Views

I am sure you mean DZ68DB.

You know that your board and processor are not supported on WIndows 10, correct?

With a board and processor this old, I would be inclined to reapply the thermal paste first (I know you have done that already, but try again), and to make certain that the heat sink fins are blown clean, as well as insuring there is nothing obstrucing the intake and exhaust vents.

Doc

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
151 Views

Try the following:

  1. During BIOS POST, use F2 key to enter BIOS Setup.
  2. Use F9 key (followed by Y) to restore the BIOS configuration to defaults.
  3. Use F10 key (followed by Y) to save this configuration and exit BIOS Setup.
  4. During subsequent BIOS POST, use F2 key to again enter BIOS Setup.
  5. Go into the Fan Speed Control configuration scene and set the Temperature Aggressiveness parameter to High.
  6. Make any other changes (Boot Order, NUMLOCK State, etc.) that you absolutely require/desire in the BIOS Configuration.
  7. Use F10 key (followed by Y) to save this configuration and exit BIOS Setup.
  8. Boot into Windows and test.

You shouldn't base any decision on the processor temperature that you see while in BIOS Setup. While in BIOS Setup, all of the processor's power management features are disabled, which means it will be consuming high power all the time, and all interrupts are disabled, which means that code is always executing (it spins in a loop when it has nothing to do). As a result, temperatures will naturally be higher - and usually will be significantly higher after a time. Base your decisions on what temperatures you see when Windows is loaded; look at the temperatures when the system is idle and when the system is made very busy.

Windows 10 is not an officially-supported O/S on your platform (either in the eyes of Intel or the eyes of Microsoft). While Windows 10 will run, it will not run optimally and, over time, support for specific hardware features is being dropped (Intel RST, for example). Because Intel is not supporting Windows 10 on this platform, there are few drivers for Windows 10. Microsoft's compatibility drivers are all that you have - and Microsoft has stopped responding to problem reports related to these drivers.

Hope this helps (forewarned is forearmed),

...S

PShek
Beginner
151 Views

Thank you for the detailed responses guys!!

I cleaned the old paste really well (BTW it's not the same one from the first time I put the PC together). I place the paste only on one side, click the heat sink into place and see that it transfers well - and it did, then I click it back to place. It did shave off a few degrees from 97C, but still very high at 90+. In comparison, I know my CPU was at less than 40C in the BIOS screen previous to that. There's really no need to reapply the paste again since it is a problem caused immediately after the BIOS update.

I've already reset the BIOS to defaults and made the fans aggressive, I even bound them to work 100% at all times - no help. That was the first thing I found online, it didn't help other people as well. They ended up buy a new CPU... I just don't want to do that right now, but I need my computer to work. I tried it again now and I didn't even get to the windows password screen.

I know WIN10 doesn't run optimally with my old rig. My PC was forcefully updated without my permission when Microsoft was doing that kind of thing. In any case, the computer ran WIN10 extremely smoothly before the BIOS update. I run some heavy software (Adobe, Matlab, etc.) and there was never any issue with response time.

I now read the BIOS update document and it says I cannot flash back to my older one because they had an architectural change right after the one I had (has to do with the 22nm CMOS gates) so that option is also closed to me.

Unless you friends can think of some genius idea, I guess that I'm having to get a new MOBO and CPU because the Intel BIOS update killed mine.

Cheers

PShek
Beginner
151 Views

OH, I also cleaned all of the dust out because I assumed it had to do with the heat (gentle vacuum and a dust blower) so all the ribs will be effective - it didn't help.

AlHill
Super User
151 Views

I wish I had an answer for you. If you find a good, cheap 3rd gen processor, it might be interesting to try it just for kicks.

For the past two years, I have been getting rid of a lot of old HW, that is still "good". Good, as it works, bad as in W10 support. But, the new HW works really well. So, have some fun with the new stuff. The new NUCs are really nice - try one!

Doc

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
151 Views

Pini,

Go into Windows and start something running that can regularly monitor temperatures and fan response - like AIDA64. Then, start something that will place a significant load on the processor. When the temperature is at 90c (or above), what is the duty cycle of the processor fan? Hint: it better be 100%! Let me know if it is not.

...S

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
151 Views

While you are at it, do exactly the process that I detailed earlier. No, you haven't done this before (not like this); do it now.

...S

PShek
Beginner
151 Views

I did it similarly before and now I did it as you said it (printed it out and everything) it still didn't work...

Since I'm running 1 core on WIN10, the CPU is literally at 90-100% at all times, still doesn't go over 51C. This is an outrageous temperature for a 1/4 CPU running! Can't get WIN10 to load with more than 1 core (tried with 2 out of 4 as well) so I can't get it to really hit up while monitoring.

I have a friend who works at Intel and can get me a new CPU and MOBO for a good price.

I'm running a 16GB, Radeon RX560, SSD HD - so with a new CPU and MOBO it should be a nice machine again

I appreciate your assistance a lot!

 

Thank you
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
151 Views

Ok. That was the known workaround for an issue where the fan speed control configuration was mucked up during a BIOS update (and which was fixed by forcing the BIOS to reset it). I didn't think that this was actually the issue (since you had said that you overrode the fans to 100% duty cycle and it didn't make a difference), but wanted to make sure.

So, looking at where you stand, the question becomes what actually happened during the BIOS update? I looked closely at the BIOS release notes. There were changes to include new microcode updates, new ME firmware, new RAID firmware and new LAN firmware. The LAN firmware is only used during PXE, so that shouldn't be an issue. The RAID firmware is only used if RAID is enabled, so that shouldn't be an issue (unless you are doing something more in this box that you haven't mentioned). The ME firmware updates consisted of minimal changes to close vulnerabilities in its external interface, so that shouldn't be an issue. That leaves the microcode updates package, which provided the updates to mitigate the Spectre Variant 2 vulnerability. Unfortunately, I do not believe that the microcode updates are responsible for this issue. I also have a i7-2600 processor and, though it is installed in a different 6 Series board, it has been updated with this same microcode updates package and it is not exhibiting this issue.

There are two things that I can think of to try at this point:

  1. Reinstall BIOS 47 using the BIOS Recovery process. Instructions for how to do so are available here: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/boards-and-kits/000005630.html?wapkw=bios+recovery Intel Desktop Boards Recovery BIOS Update Instructions. See my notes below as well.
  2. Attempt to downgrade to BIOS 43, which also requires that you to use the BIOS Recovery process. I am not optimistic that this will work (because BIOS 47 included a ME firmware update) but attempting to do so cannot make things worse (if it can't be supported, it will simply abort the process before any changes are actually made).

Note the following (my additions to the documented BIOS Recovery process):

  1. Use a small USB 2.0 flash disk. Do not use USB 3.0 flash disks!
  2. Reformat this flash disk on another Windows-based PC, using the FAT32 file system, with the Quick Format option disabled. Do not attempt to do this on a Linux- or MACos-based PC. Sorry for how long this takes.
  3. Place file DB0047.BIO in the root folder of the flash disk. Place nothing else on the flash disk!
  4. Properly eject the flash disk using the Safely Remove Hardware and Eject Media applet in the System Tray.
  5. Plug the USB flash disk into one of the (black) USB 2.0 ports on the back panel of the board. Do not use the (blue) USB 3.0 ports on the back panel and do not use any front panel USB ports.
  6. After successfully updating the BIOS using the BIOS Recovery process, I recommend that you reset the BIOS Configuration.
  7. For the attempt to back off to BIOS 43, delete file DB0047.BIO and then add file DB0043.BIO. Repeat steps 4, 5 and definitely do 6.

Hope this helps,

...S

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