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mikeyboy
Beginner
162 Views

Enable FIVR access - 11th gen

Hello

 

I'm getting sick of my Dell XPS getting so hot. I've always had success in the past by reducing the voltages but unfortunately that feature has been removed for no good reason. I'm getting sick of this laptop getting so hot and the fans starting up when I'm doing something not even that intensive like watching youtube. Plundervolt isn't even an actual threat to most people, and even then you should allow them to make their own choice if they wish to enable FIVR access so tools like throttlestop can work their magic. I'm having to reduce the max cpu usage percentage in windows power options just to try and stop the thing from cooking my legs. 

 

We all know ultrabooks have poor cooling systems in them and undervolting was one great way of reducing the temperatures. Please unlock this feature again.

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15 Replies
AlHill
Super User
157 Views

Your problem lies with DELL and their design.  You need to consult with dell for a solution.

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)

mikeyboy
Beginner
154 Views

Dell didn't design the CPU. The solution is for the fivr access to be unlocked.

AlHill
Super User
151 Views

No, they did not.   But, they did design the laptop, and designed inadequate cooling and thermal solutions.  They did force you to undervolt, so you could avoid using the full potenrial of your processor.  They did provide a warranty, which you paid for.  They are fully responsible for your laptop.  You have no relationship with Intel.  Your relationship is with Dell.   Whether or not you care about potential security risks, Intel does.

 

Complain to dell.

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)

 

mikeyboy
Beginner
149 Views

It's just a fact that there are inherent difficulties in effectively cooling laptops of this size, that doesn't mean that things should not be done to help the situation. Undervolting has no effect on the performance of the processor though. Of course I can request assistance from dell but as I stated, Intel made the CPU, they are responsible for that and the lack of FIVR access is an issue affecting more than just dell devices so not, it's not solely a Dell problem. I wouldn't go to dell for an HP laptop that suffers from the same problem.....

AlHill
Super User
144 Views

Dell or HP, all poor designs and customer rip offs.

Just an opinion, of course. 

Doc (not an Intel employee or contractor)

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
138 Views

I agree. No platform should ever need the undervolting capability. That it might be required is an indication that the laptop manufacturer has provided an inadequate cooling solution. They charged you for a premium cooling solution (which they never provided) and they charge you for premium support (which you will never see) and toss in a crappy warranty to boot (anything less than 3 years is just them stealing money out of your pockets). What slimebuckets. How people can continue to put up with the crap that companies like HP and Dell continue to spew, I don't understand. On top of everything else, they then throw in power throttling settings that cripple the processor just so they can make false claims about battery life (unfortunately, this site won't let me use the flowery descriptions that these slimebuckets really deserve). You people really need to get an understanding of the problem before you pounce on Intel for problems that are outside of their control.

...S

mikeyboy
Beginner
128 Views

wow such hostility. What an unfriendly place this is....

 

Not really sure "you people" have a strong grasp on physics here though ( or manners), there are bound to be limitations on how well some form factors can be cooled. Using the minimum stable voltage in order to reduce the amount of cooling required is a key part of ensuring the cooling solutions are not overworking beyond their design. Having the ability to set that myself is useful and I am now unable to do that, thus forcing the laptop to be hotter than it needs to be. Obviously Dell can't design a cooling solution with no limitations, even a "premium cooling solution"  will have a point where it can't cool any more, so why pile on more heat than it can handle?????

 

In fact, intel completely removing the feature instead of actually fixing the vulnerability properly is pretty crappy and lazy...

 

DeividA_Intel
Moderator
93 Views

Hello mikeyboy,  

  


Thank you for posting on the Intel® communities.   



I would like to let you know that even if Intel integrates/designs a technology or feature for a processor, the laptop manufacturer that uses the CPU can decide if their laptop is compatible with the feature/technology. DELL (as in this case) can delete/modify/add/restrict any features depending on the capabilities of the laptop, they can even remove a previously worked feature with a BIOS update if it can affect negatively the laptop.


My recommendation, as well as the community, is to get in contact with DELL and check if they can bring back or enable this option on a BIOS update or if there is an app/feature approved for them to decrease the high temperatures. Remember that Intel does not recommend overclocking the processor since this can damage the unit and sometimes it can void the warranty.



If you would like to troubleshoot the issue prior to getting in contact with DELL, try the following:


1. Use the Intel® Processor Diagnostic Tool to check if the CPU is defective:

- https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/19792


2. Try a BIOS update.


3. Disable any overclocking option at the BIOS as well as the Turbo boost and Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (Intel® XMP).


4. Try reinstalling the operating system.


5. If none of the previous work, check the warranty option with DELL.


  

 


Regards,  


Deivid A. 

Intel Customer Support Technician 


DeividA_Intel
Moderator
64 Views

Hello mikeyboy, 



Were you able to check the previous post? Please let me know if you need more assistance.   



Regards,  


Deivid A.  

Intel Customer Support Technician  


mikeyboy
Beginner
51 Views

Hi Deivid

I haven't had a chance to so this yet, I'll let you know how I get on.

Im not sure this is something that Dell wool have the ability to enable though

Thanks

DeividA_Intel
Moderator
45 Views

Hello mikeyboy, 



Thanks for the update, I understand that you may need more time to try the recommendation. I will be waiting for your outcome.




Regards,  


Deivid A. 

Intel Customer Support Technician 


DeividA_Intel
Moderator
31 Views



Hello mikeyboy, 



Were you able to try the recommendations? Please let me know if you need more assistance.   


  


Regards,  


Deivid A.  

Intel Customer Support Technician  


mikeyboy
Beginner
25 Views

I've run the diagnostic tool and all is well. I am on the latest BIOS too. There is no overclocking options in the BIOS and I have disabled turbo Boost to try and nkeep temps down. Dell does have a thermal profile software but it's not very good. I can't reinstall right now as I need to do a backup but it's something I am considering. 

 

I'm getting mixed messages here around whether the lack of undervolting ability is actually due to Intel or Dell. The author of ThrottleStop says that Intel have done something to prevent the FIVR readings being read and it's not something that could be fixed with a BIOS update. I'm trying to find clarification as to whether that is the case. 

To note, I am not talking about overclocking it, I am talking about reducing the voltage to the lowest stable value in order to decrease temperature and battery usage.  The quote the ThrottleStop developer 

 

"The Intel 11th Gen G4 and G7 series have had CPU voltage control completely disabled. This might have been fused at the hardware level by Intel. This is Intel's fix for the previous Plundervolt issues. With 10th Gen you could edit a couple of UEFI variables and restore voltage control. "

 

I am looking for clarification around whether this is true or if you can do something to bring it back ?

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
10 Views

I can explain...

Intel, in the latest releases of their processor microcode updates, disabled support for undervolting. Right or wrong, this was Intel's mitigation for the Plundervolt! vulnerability (see: Plundervolt! A new Intel Processor ‘undervolting’ Vulnerability). That is, Intel could come up with no other mitigation for this vulnerability other than simply disabling the use of the capability.

Microcode update packages are distributed as part of board/platform firmware updates (BIOS release packages). Where Dell likely comes into play is that they shipped new BIOS releases that included the new microcode updates. What this means is that, from one BIOS release to another, the platform went from supporting undervolting to not supporting undervolting.

Again, this was a decision made by Intel. Their policy is to require some form of mitigation for every vulnerability that is detected. In this case, disabling the capability was the only mitigation that they could identify in the timeframe available.

To answer your question, I do not see this capability coming back anytime soon. Hopefully, Intel will reenable the capability once they have an alternate mitigation available in silicon. For existing processors, you simply do not have the capability any longer.

Sorry, reality bites,

...S

DeividA_Intel
Moderator
19 Views

Hello mikeyboy, 



I do appreciate the information provided, I will check this internally to be able to deliver you a better response and confirm if this option/feature was disabled for this processor's model.



I will post back once I have more details.





Best regards,  


Deivid A.  

Intel Customer Support Technician


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