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TCLEM5
Beginner
87 Views

Est-ce que je peux changer mon processeur sans affecter mon système windows ?

Bonjour,

 

je souhaite changer de processeur, j'ai actuellement sur mon PC un Intel Core i5-4690 CPU 3.50GHz assorti d'une carte mère Asus H81M-E (version X.0x).

 

J'aimerai passer sur quelques chose approchant le i5-9600K et savoir si remplacer le processeur va affecter mon système et mes données ? est-ce que cela risque d'affecter mon disque dur et devrais-je réinstaller tout ce qui se trouve sur mon ordinateur ?

 

C'est peut-être une question bête mais je préfère être sur avant de faire une bêtise.

 

Merci beaucoup pour votre aide.

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3 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
37 Views

First of all, just to be sure you understand, a motherboard with a particular chipset can be used with processors from only a very small number of generations (usually only one). Further, while many processor generations are capable of being used with multiple memory (DRAM) technologies, a motherboard can only support one technology. There is good information on the matching of chipsets with processor generations starting here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_chipsets.

 

Ok, let's look at your H81M-E motherboard. It has a 8 Series chipset, the H81. It can host only 4th generation processors. It supports only DDR3 memory. It supports only the 1066 - 1600 MHz memory bus speeds. Next, let's take a general look at motherboards that could host the Core i5-9600K. They will have one of a specific set of 300 series chipsets (H310, B365, B360, H370, Q370, Z370 or Z390). They will support only DDR4 memory. Bottom line, moving from a 4th generation processor to a 9th generation processor means replacing your processor, your motherboard and your memory.

 

All that (exhaustively) explained, let's look at your question: Can you move your current Windows (I presume Windows 10) installation from the old processor/motherboard/memory to this new processor/motherboard/memory? The answer is: yes, it will usually work. Regardless, I do not recommend it.

 

If it is going to work, you will successfully boot from your installed Windows image and your keyboard and mouse will respond. If it isn't going to work, either it will not boot at all or it will boot but your keyboard and mouse will not respond. [Aside: it could take some number of minutes before the keyboard and mouse will respond; be patient and give it time.] In either failing case, you will need to reinstall Windows. This is not really awful; usually you can do this as an upgrade of the existing installation, thereby avoiding having to move stuff around or reinstall third-party software packages.

 

Ok, once you are booted and logged in -- which means that drivers have been automatically installed that will at least partially support your processor and your new chipset -- you will need to load all of the driver packages necessary to properly support your new processor, chipset and motherboard. In most cases, your new motherboard manufacturer will provide a web page that you can use to download all of these packages (in some rare cases, they will have an installation application that takes care of all of this for you). Lastly, if you are using an add-in graphics card, it is recommended that you install (or reinstall) the latest driver package for this graphics card (this is because it may install different binaries for different processor/chipset combinations).

 

That's it in a nutshell. Why do I recommend doing a fresh install of Windows? Well, things can go wrong and you end up with a mess. Even if it succeeds, you will have bloat in your Windows files because it retains the device records and driver files for the previous processor, chipset and motherboard. If you want to stay as clean as possible, I recommend that you do a fresh install.

 

Hope this helps,

...S

TCLEM5
Beginner
37 Views

Thank you very much for your precious help ! I did not expect such details but I see I neglected a lot of things. I'll take advantage of having an expert here to ask a few questions after your clarifications:

 

I understood I need to get a new mother board that accept the 9th generations of Intel, but I am not really sure if I also need to change my memory(/hard drive?) ? Is it configured to work with my actual processor and chipset?

 

Then what happen If I replace my motherdboard/processor inside my computer and I turn it on without any other thing ? Do I get a blackscreen ? Do i get my "windows session" screen as usual ? Or is my system down ? It join the first questin but I ask it more out of curiosity.

 

Next question is about graphic processor, I found out that unlike the I5-9600K the I5-9400F do not come with a graphic processor in it. And I have in my computer a graphic card AMD Radeon R9 200 that I am satisfied with. If I take the 9600K is the graphic processor Inside useless ? As I already have a card. I could go with the 9400?

Also a small question if you happen to know if there is a big difference of performance between the two models? Or it is mainly the absence of graphic processor? As there is a difference of prices.

 

In essence, the thing I don't know is where does the Windows 10 system is "saved" (if we can say it like it) ? Is it installed inside the processor ?

 

 

Thanks again for your help

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
37 Views

RE: "I am not really sure if I also need to change my memory(/hard drive?) ? Is it configured to work with my actual processor and chipset? Then what happen if I replace my motherboard/processor inside my computer and I turn it on without any other thing ? Do I get a black screen? Do i get my "windows session" screen as usual ? Or is my system down ? It join the first question but I ask it more out of curiosity."

 

  • You mean storage; your memory *has* to be changed (you will be going from DDR3 to DDR4).

 

  • If you connect your Windows boot drive as it is (namely setup to support your old motherboard and processor), then Windows will attempt to change this support over to the new motherboard and processor. If it can, great. If it cannot, then it will tell you that it can't and you will need to reinstall Windows. But, as I said, you can do an Upgrade of your existing install and thus have it happen in place. Bottom line, you are safe trying this.

 

 

 

RE: "Next question is about graphic processor, I found out that unlike the I5-9600K the I5-9400F do not come with a graphic processor in it. And I have in my computer a graphic card AMD Radeon R9 200 that I am satisfied with. If I take the 9600K is the graphic processor Inside useless ? As I already have a card. I could go with the 9400? Also a small question if you happen to know if there is a big difference of performance between the two models? Or it is mainly the absence of graphic processor? As there is a difference of prices."

 

  • The i5-9400/i5-9400F are lower performance processors. If you want the same level of performance but still aren't interested in having the internal graphics engine, look at the i5-9600KF part.

 

  • If you have a i5-9600K and you install the Radeon graphics card, the BIOS will automatically disable the processor's internal graphics engine -- which is essentially the same as having the i5-9600KF processor. Similarly, if you have a i5-9400 and you install the Radeon graphics card, the BIOS will automatically disable the processor's internal graphics engine -- which is essentially the same as having the i5-9400F.

 

  • The i5-9400F is less expensive than the i5-9400. Similarly, the i5-9600KF is less expensive than the i5-9600K. The i5-9600KF is more expensive than the i5-9400F, of course, but it definitely performs better.

 

 

 

RE: "In essence, the thing I don't know is where does the Windows 10 system is "saved" (if we can say it like it) ? Is it installed inside the processor?"

 

  • The configuration of Windows 10 is stored in files on the drive. When you switch to the new motherboard and processor, these files will be updated. The big question is whether we can get this to happen automatically or you have to do the manual Windows 10 upgrade to get it to do so.

 

 

I think I answered all of your questions.

...S

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