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KBlan
Beginner
1,597 Views

Hello I have simple processor question

Hello Intel I have a simple question:

Out of the i7 processors (gen.7/gen.8), which model has the strongest PER-CORE strength/speed? I need one for a specific task that requires minimal parallel processing, so in that case should I choose one of the dual core models? Since theres only two are they each about 2x as strong as the ones that are in the quad cores? If so which one?

SOrry for the dumb question but I can't seem to find (or understand) this info (lol) and I would love a professional answer

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8 Replies
idata
Community Manager
123 Views

KingKade7: Thank you for joining the Intel® communities support.

 

 

You mentioned you need that information since you will be using it for a specific task that requires minimal parallel processing, what is that task, what is the application you will use?

 

Your question is very general and we want to gather more details to try to provide the most accurate response.

 

 

In the following link you will find a comparison chart between 2 Intel® processors, 7th and 8th generations, in there you will be able to see all the specifications for each of them, you will be able to verify the quantity of cores, threads and clock speed, the more the cores the better:

 

https://ark.intel.com/compare/126686,97128

 

 

You can get this same comparison chart for any of our Intel® processors, please visit our web site, select "Processors", then choose any processor family, then any processor model, you will see at the top an option that says "Compare".

 

Try the same steps to add one or more processor models, you will see then at the top of the page a number, depending on the processors you added to compare, select that option and you will get the chart.

 

 

Regards,

 

Alberto R.

 

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

 

Under Contract to Intel Corporation
idata
Community Manager
123 Views

KingKade7: I just wanted to check if you saw the information posted previously and if you need further assistance on this matter?

 

 

Regards,

 

Alberto R.

 

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

 

Under Contract to Intel Corporation
FLupi1
Beginner
123 Views

Just asking, is there in some bios an option of setting it to- for instance- dual core, while two/four cores work as one? That would help this man.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
123 Views

I am not quite sure what you are asking. Many BIOS have parameters that allow you to specify how many of the Cores are to be enabled and whether HyperThreading is to be enabled. Some versions of Windows also have parameter(s) for specifying how many of the Cores are to be used by Windows. Is this what you are referring to?

...S

FLupi1
Beginner
123 Views

No, I mean for example two cores acting as one, that would help the single core apps.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
123 Views

No, that's simply not possible. An application that is not specifically designed for multiple execution threads cannot use multiple execution threads, plain and simple. The whole idea of TurboBoost is to speed up this single-threaded (single-core) app if/when the other cores are only being lightly used.

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FLupi1
Beginner
123 Views

Yes, but if there was an option in bios to set the cpu to a single core mode(all cores active), so the system sees the cpu like that, the single core app would be able to use all cores while thinking it is using one. If I was him, I would get some K model and overclock, set the first core higher, job done.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
123 Views

No, it isn't that simple. Relatively speaking, a single-threaded app is required to have its instructions executed in a specific order (there are cases where an compiler can analyze a specific set of instructions and optimize for out of order execution, but this is usually only to take advantages of parallel execution streams within a single core). In order to utilize multiple threads of execution, the application must be designed specifically for this. In Windows, because most applications are single-threaded, the Kernel will schedule these applications to execute on different cores (or threads, if HyperThreading is supported and enabled) in order to "spread the load'. It is when this isn't necessary that Turbo mode shines. Essentially, it allows cores to be automatically overclocked so that more can get done faster, provided certain criteria - like thermals (because an overclocked core generates more heat) - are met. You yourself simply cannot tweak the part to outperform the Turbo feature. In fact, even if the processor is overclocked, the Turbo feature may still be used if criteria allow.

...S

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