Processors
Processors (Intel® Core™, Intel® Xeon®, etc); processor utilities and programs (Intel® Processor Identification Utility, Intel® Extreme Tuning Utility, Intel® Easy Streaming Wizard, etc.)
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Max CPU Memory.

REO51ST
Beginner
318 Views

This is in reference to the i5-10400H.

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/201895/intel-core-i5-10400h-processor-8m-cache-...

It lists 128GB max memory size with 2 channels.

Would that mean that the max is 128GB per channel???

The i5-6300U is listed at 32GB max.

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/88190/intel-core-i56300u-processor-3m-cache-up-...

But will run just fine with 64GB installed???

https://www.dell.com/community/Latitude/Dell-Latitude-E5470-i5-6200U-Memory-Upgrade-what-s-the-max/m...

Thanks for any replies.

Best regards,

REO

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3 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
294 Views
1. No, it's the maximum for both channels combined. That is, it supports a maximum of 64GB per channel.
2. The maximum is based upon the memory technologies available and validated at the time of launch. It is often possible that new memory technologies will appear after launch that can be supported by the processor (though this may be limited by the BIOS support on the motherboard). In your case, your processor supported a maximum of 32GB (16GB per channel) at launch. Later on, memory technology was introduced that allowed 64GB (32GB per channel) to be possible - and your motherboard had BIOS support to deliver it.
Clear as mud?
...S
REO51ST
Beginner
289 Views

@n_scott_pearson 

Not so clear, like mud!

Not sure how newer memory technology would overcome the limitations of the CPU and chipset???

And if so why are the data sheets not updated to reflect these inovations in memory technology???

Best regards,

REO

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
274 Views

First of all, there are no limitations WRT the chipset; the memory controllers are built into the processor, not the chipset.

As for the processor, in most cases, when we refer to a new memory technology being introduced, we are simply talking about memory IC density being increased (typically doubled). That is, each DRAM IC is providing double the number of bits that it was before. In cases like this, once the MRC (Memory Reference Code) in the motherboard's BIOS is updated to reflect this density improvement, off you go (there are no changes necessary in the processor's memory controllers).

Intel simply does not reflect changes like this in the datasheets. Once the datasheets are locked down for release, they stay the way they are. Intel warrants the processor based upon the validation they do prior to launch. Since the memory supportable is also a function of the motherboard's BIOS, a motherboard whose BIOS remains based upon the MRC that existed at processor launch may only be able to support what was stated as the maximum then. If you changed the spec to say double (for example) that is supported and you had this motherboard with the original MRC, then it might not be able to work with that additional memory. Intel leaves it to the motherboard manufacturers to validate their support for memory beyond the specs. 

...S

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