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Beginner
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Overheating due to continous turbo boost

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I have a Lenovo Ideapad L340 laptop with intel i5 9300H. While gaming the CPU temps are under 75 as it runs at the base clock(2.4ghz) and on turbo boost(4.1) when needed only for few secs. But a few days back I installed SSD and did a clean windows 10 install, but now while gaming the CPU runs constantly at turbo boost(4.1) and the temps reach 90+. Can someone tell me what went wrong?
I really need some help

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Moderator
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Hello Ameyamey,

 

Thank you for posting on the Intel* Community.

 

Based on the information provided, your processor is working within the specifications since the T-junction of the processor is 100°C (Junction Temperature is the maximum temperature allowed at the processor’s die). It is normal to have temperature and frequency spikes under different tasks, this may vary depending on workload, hardware, software, and overall system configuration.

 

You can follow these additional steps that can help you to optimize the temperature of your laptop:

 

Air ventilation

  • Place the laptop PC on a flat and hard surface where the bottom and side air vents are not obstructed.
  • Use a can of compressed air to remove dust or debris from the air vents, dust filters (if any), and cooling fan fins.

Drivers and BIOS

  • Make sure that you are using the latest drivers and BIOS.
  • Try to load the default BIOS setting in your system.

 

You can test your Intel unit using our Intel Processor Diagnostic Tool (IPDT) which checks brand identification, verifies the processor operating frequency, tests processor-specific features and performs a stress test on the processor.

 

The Intel Turbo Boost Technology is dynamic and the frequency varies depending on workload, hardware, software, and overall system configuration, not all the cores will increase their frequency or will be working at the same speed, it not supposed to be stocked in one frequency. Please verify this with the equipment manufacturer since it may vary depending on your laptop design.

 

Please, contact HP to confirm if the temperature spikes are under the expected considering your specific Laptop model, they may provide you with a tool to monitor the system. Keep in mind that Intel just provides the CPU in stock settings, and we do not have control over any customization or limitation that the equipment manufacturer has performed. Also, as you performed hardware changes you have to verify with them that the system is working correctly and that the components are fully compatible.

 

I will proceed to close this thread. If you need any additional information, please submit a new question as this thread will no longer be monitored.

 

Best regards,

Maria R.

Intel Customer Support Technician

 

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2 Replies
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Super User Retired Employee
90 Views

First of all, there's nothing wrong or concerning about seeing temperatures reaching ~90c (though concerns will rise if it gets much hotter than that, however).

It is unclear, since you didn't mention it, what the previous drive was. If you are going from a SATA HDD to a NVMe SSD, that is a very significant jump in performance. If you have a game that was I/O bound previously, this jump in performance could result in the processor working harder (because it doesn't have to wait as much) and this will produce higher temperatures.

...S

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Highlighted
Moderator
67 Views

Hello Ameyamey,

 

Thank you for posting on the Intel* Community.

 

Based on the information provided, your processor is working within the specifications since the T-junction of the processor is 100°C (Junction Temperature is the maximum temperature allowed at the processor’s die). It is normal to have temperature and frequency spikes under different tasks, this may vary depending on workload, hardware, software, and overall system configuration.

 

You can follow these additional steps that can help you to optimize the temperature of your laptop:

 

Air ventilation

  • Place the laptop PC on a flat and hard surface where the bottom and side air vents are not obstructed.
  • Use a can of compressed air to remove dust or debris from the air vents, dust filters (if any), and cooling fan fins.

Drivers and BIOS

  • Make sure that you are using the latest drivers and BIOS.
  • Try to load the default BIOS setting in your system.

 

You can test your Intel unit using our Intel Processor Diagnostic Tool (IPDT) which checks brand identification, verifies the processor operating frequency, tests processor-specific features and performs a stress test on the processor.

 

The Intel Turbo Boost Technology is dynamic and the frequency varies depending on workload, hardware, software, and overall system configuration, not all the cores will increase their frequency or will be working at the same speed, it not supposed to be stocked in one frequency. Please verify this with the equipment manufacturer since it may vary depending on your laptop design.

 

Please, contact HP to confirm if the temperature spikes are under the expected considering your specific Laptop model, they may provide you with a tool to monitor the system. Keep in mind that Intel just provides the CPU in stock settings, and we do not have control over any customization or limitation that the equipment manufacturer has performed. Also, as you performed hardware changes you have to verify with them that the system is working correctly and that the components are fully compatible.

 

I will proceed to close this thread. If you need any additional information, please submit a new question as this thread will no longer be monitored.

 

Best regards,

Maria R.

Intel Customer Support Technician

 

View solution in original post

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