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Beginner
117 Views

Safe temperatures for user exposers on a laptop?

I have been web browsing for an answer and I have not found anything that was helpful. I see people searching for safe CPU temperatures because they do not want to damage their hardware, but what about how hot the laptop can be for the safety of the user? 

 

I want to know if there is a temperature standard for user safety! 

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Super User
111 Views

So the Intel support engineers can have more information about your system, Download, run, and save the results of this utility as a text file:
https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/25293/Intel-System-Support-Utility

Then ATTACH the text file using the instructions under the reply window ( Drag and drop here or browse files to attach ).

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Beginner
107 Views

I will give it a go for more info. My issue right now is not so much the CPU temps but that the fan exhausts 110f air which can cause burns and is unsafe. 

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Super User
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110f causing burns?  I do not think so.

 

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Beginner
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A thermal burn is a type of burn resulting from making contact with heated objects, such as ... Such burns imprinted on the skin usually form a pattern that resembles the object. Sources of ... The minimum temperature that can cause a burn in a finite amount of time is 44 °C (111 °F)  Wikipedia

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Super User
90 Views

But, you said "AIR".  Now you say "making contact".  Whatever the case, if you were serious about this, you would have provided the ssu report rather than debating the issue.

 

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Super User
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After reviewing this thread, two things.

First, I misread your initial post.  Sorry about that.

Second, is it not the case that all laptop manufacturers will be different?  The cooling solutions regarding laptops vary widely, with some having no issues, to others being vary warm (if not hot).  If a user puts a laptop on their lap, are they not restricting airflow?  Then there are the users who will overclock certain laptops, thus causing additional heat?  Laptop manufacturers are going to be the biggest issue here, however, with the shortcuts they take, which is at the expense of quality.

Whatever the case, the Intel support engineers may be able to answer this question regarding thermal limits for laptops.  However, your wikipedia citation may be the closest you get.

 

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Beginner
81 Views

Well this laptop has been back to Gigabyte twice now to fix this issue. I really was not trying to debate anything but I was trying to find out if there was any safety standard relating to product safety. I have tried the "throttle stop" suggestions but that has not really worked out. I believe the issue is the cooler, the heat pipes are shared. What is happening the CPU itself will max out at 75ish under a stress test but if the dedicated GPU kicks in(it maxes at 60c) the CPU will get hotter. What is really my issue is that the fans/cooler will only effectively cool up to a fan speed of 60%. Any higher speed makes no cooling difference the only thing a high speed does is blow the hotter CPU air out in alarming volume. This system was poorly designed and I would like to tell them to fix it so it performs safely or just buy it back. This ordeal has gone on for 7 months now. 

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Super User
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Well, you have pretty much summed it up regarding gigabyte and your laptop.  I cannot offer anything except this:  the fans are controlled by the gigabyte bios.  If you have not updated the bios, you may want to in case there were any improvements made by gigabyte.  Also, undervolting is no longer allowed as it presents a security risk. 

Many laptops suffer from cheap/shoddy design flaws which show themselves as heat.  If I were you, I would be all over gigabyte.

 

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Beginner
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With COVID and all; I have been very patient with this issue. It seems they have stopped responding and Newegg is not being helpful either. I was hoping that there was some actual safety standard I could use to help bring a resolution. The laptop bios is unless there is nothing in there to adjust. They pretty much have all the control options locked out. I am at a loss as to where to go from here. 

 

By the way, thank you for having a discussion about this with me. 

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Super User
65 Views

I would imagine that such rules are specific to a country, or the EU, or US. 

Good luck and post back if you do find something.

 

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Super User Retired Employee
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Beginner
50 Views

Thanks, I have not found any product safety data yet. There does seem to be this guideline and my laptop would be considered unsafe. 

"In fact, one gets very uncomfortable and minimally functional at temperatures higher than 105°F (40.5°C). Various governmental bodies such as the US Labor Department’s OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) and Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) also stipulate limits on safe working / operating temperatures."https://www.electronics-cooling.com/2016/09/surface-temperatures-of-electronics-products-appliances-...

 

I am including this in emails. 

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Beginner
46 Views

Most laptops are designed to work in these outdoor temperatures. If the temperature outside exceeds 95 degrees, the heat can cause hard drive components to expand which can cause failure and permanent hardware damage. Batteries are exceptionally vulnerable. A few short periods of exposure to excessive outdoor heat can cause a reduction in battery life.

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