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AMats9
Beginner
2,112 Views

Spectre threat and Core i7 3930K (Sandy Bridge E)

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Hello,

I have a question about Spectre, a processor security vulnerability.

I have used Core i7 3930K (Sandy Bridge E) on ASUS P9X79 mainboard since 2012.

Intel released latest Microcode Revision Guidance April 2 2018 but I couldn't find Sandy Bridge E on the list.

https://newsroom.intel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2018/04/microcode-update-guidance.pdf https://newsroom.intel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2018/04/microcode-update-guidance.pdf

There exists Sandy Bridge Server EN/EP/EP4S; furthermore, Ivy Bridge E. Why Intel neglects Sandy Bridge E?

Sandy Bridge E has no future now? Should I seek a used 4930K (Ivy Bridge E), about 300USD, to avoid Spectre threat?

Please give me suggestions.

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1 Solution
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
164 Views

I don't believe that anything has been neglected. The chart is just not very complete when it comes to what they list in the Product Name and Public Name columns.

Try looking up your processor using its CPUID code.

Hope this helps,

...S

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3 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
165 Views

I don't believe that anything has been neglected. The chart is just not very complete when it comes to what they list in the Product Name and Public Name columns.

Try looking up your processor using its CPUID code.

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post

AMats9
Beginner
164 Views

Thank you for your helpful suggestions.

I was at a loss when I had wasted 12 hours to convert my parents' "threatened with Spectre" P6X58, my retired main machine, to a brand new "safe" Z370 last Saturday.

After many trials, I found that Windows 10 USB installer x86/x64 version has a trouble with M.2. Only x64 version works. I don't have time to care my P9X79 any more and your suggestions were precious.

It was difficult for me to find out the exact die code name and CPUID of Core i7 3930K. But I made it. Thanks a lot to Wikipedia.

It should be Sandy Bridge-EP-8, 0206D7h and C2 stepping.

And Core i7 3930K has another name, Xeon E5 1650. Is-it right? It is indicated in the "safe" list of Intel. I'm released!

Some extreme PC shops of AKIHABARA had sold Xeon E5 series to the heavy users of P9X79 in the Spring of 2013.

I remenber a shop notice; "No question, no support. Try it with your own responsibility!".

It was "the finest days" of AKIHABARA as the centre of PC hardware lovers. Regrettably the prosperity passed away now.

Thank you Scott. I'm deeply relieved. Thank you again.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
164 Views

No problem, that's why I'm here (plus it keeps me busy in retirement ).

Overall, Intel (as well as Microsoft) is dropping support for 32-bit Windows. Insofar as M.2 support is concerned, if you are using a M.2 SATA SSD, you can still get away with using BIOS legacy boot mode, but if you are using a M.2 NVMe SSD, you absolutely must enable and use UEFI (and GPT partitioning) to use (and boot from!) the drive.

Enjoy the new builds...

...S

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