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Will the Intel Core i9-10850K work with 3200mhz Memory

CW1962
Novice
742 Views

I am building a new PC for a customer.  I will be using the Gigabyte Z590 Aorus Elite ATX LGA 1200 Intel Z590 ATX Motherboard. I want to use the Intel i9-10850k processor. I read the memory specs on Gigabyte and intel's website for this processor saying to use up to 2933MHZ and that's what I wanted to get but can not find any that speed in 2 16gb stick in stock. Newegg and best buy both is telling me to use 3200MHZ. I have ran into booting issues in the past when I build and don't use recommended memory. I want to know if any one on here knows for sure if I can use the 3200MHZ memory. Thanks 

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CW1962
Novice
721 Views

Thanks, that is way I always check specs before putting together a build. I guess newegg and best buy just wanted to make a sell. I thought maybe they knew something I didn't know so I thought I would ask here first. Again thanks for your help.

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3 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
729 Views

This processor is validated for and warranted by Intel to support DDR4-2933. DDR4-3200 is one bin above this level. My opinion - which is really all that we can give here - is that the processor is likely to work with memory that is only one bin higher. But (there's always a 'but'), understand that using memory at higher speeds is considered to be a form of overclocking and could void the processor's warranty. A few points to consider:

  • Operating the memory buses at higher clock speeds could potentially heat the processor in unexpected ways. I use the word 'unexpected' loosely; it is not guaranteed that Intel has validated how running at this speed could affect the processor - or they did do this validation and rejected its support due to short- or long-term affects on the processor.
  • The primary cause of failed memory operations - and potential bus lockup - is electrical noise. All components generate electrical noise. The memory buses on the motherboard are designed to suppress as much noise as possible. If noise levels reach certain thresholds, it becomes impossible to reliably distinguish data from noise. Secondly, components generate more noise as they age. Thus, a secondary consideration is that the affects of using this clock speed is going to have longer-term. The system may work just fine when initially build, but start to fail as noise levels increase. Yes, this is likely years down the line, but still has to be considered in the decision.
  • One of the things you can do is lock the memory to run at the lower, warranted speed. This can be accomplished by disabling XMP profiles or manually setting the memory parameters (if offered as a capability in the BIOS, that is).

Hope this helps,

...S

CW1962
Novice
722 Views

Thanks, that is way I always check specs before putting together a build. I guess newegg and best buy just wanted to make a sell. I thought maybe they knew something I didn't know so I thought I would ask here first. Again thanks for your help.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
677 Views

Remember the tenets of Economics: Supply and Demand. It may be that the sweet spot for sales is at this higher frequency and thus it is actually cheaper to purchase the higher frequency DIMMs. This is why I included the third option, namely running the DIMMs at the lower, fully supported frequency.

...S

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