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12253 Discussions

Windows 11, of course.

Kupuna
New Contributor I
884 Views

MS says my year-old NUC Core i7 8809G won't work with Windows 11. True? Thanks for clarifying.

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powerarmour
Valued Contributor I
796 Views

It's 'branded' 8th gen, technically it's a 7th gen Kaby Lake architecture (not true 8th gen Coffee Lake).

Though curiously I spotted the Celeron 3867U on that MS list, which is a Kaby Lake R, and if that's supported then it's all semantics anyway.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/minimum/supported/windows-11-supported-inte...

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powerarmour
Valued Contributor I
838 Views

Yes, true unfortunately, as technically the i7-8809G is a 7th gen Intel CPU:

https://twitter.com/windowsdev/status/1408179374596276228

 

However, we don't know yet if this is a strict hardware limitation, or just a support advisory for system builders and OEMs. For example Win10 20H2 doesn't list Intel 4th gen CPU's as being compatible, but there is no real enforcement there.

 

I'd just wait and see tbh.

LeonWaksman
Super User
803 Views

The i7-8809G although has Status Discontinued however it is 8th gen processor.  

Just saying. 

 

Leon

 

powerarmour
Valued Contributor I
797 Views

It's 'branded' 8th gen, technically it's a 7th gen Kaby Lake architecture (not true 8th gen Coffee Lake).

Though curiously I spotted the Celeron 3867U on that MS list, which is a Kaby Lake R, and if that's supported then it's all semantics anyway.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/minimum/supported/windows-11-supported-inte...

BHarr8
Valued Contributor I
816 Views

All restrictions are currently artificial and can be easily bypassed.

I have Windows 11 running in an rp5700 test box. That's a Core2 Duo system that came with XP installed.

If it runs 10 without issue, its compatible with 11, you might just need to bypass the checks.

In my case I dropped the Windows 11 .WIM file into a Windows 10 install image and it installed without issue.

powerarmour
Valued Contributor I
786 Views

@BHarr8 wrote:

All restrictions are currently artificial and can be easily bypassed.


I'm sure that'll be the case also, but obviously when it comes to support it just means MS won't help anyone if their unlisted CPU has any issues or lack of functionality going forward. 

BHarr8
Valued Contributor I
769 Views

If there is some sort if major issue with future Windows 11 builds and an unsupported device you can always go back to Windows 10, There are still several years of support on tap. To me, this is just about having more options available. I like to play around with new technology.

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