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klughads
Beginner
724 Views

i7-9700K - Is Short Duration Package Power Limit fast enough to protect CPU from overheating?

Intel i7-9700K

 

Assume that Short/Long Duration Package Power Limit is setup so that the CPU keeps cool enough even during heavy loads.

 

Q: Does the CPU always react quickly enough (clocks down) not to overheat when heavy AVX loads suddenly appears? I'm thinking of a very short time, like the first milliseconds or so. Or does the CPU react more quickly using AVX offset?

 

 

 

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5 Replies
David_V_Intel
Employee
357 Views

Hello klughads,

 

Thank you for posting on the Intel ® communities.

 

I would like to know why the information is required, in other words, are you thinking of changing the voltage or overclock the processor to a point where it could overheat? Are you experiencing overheating issues? 

 

Let me know so I can assist you

 

 

Regards,

David V

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

Under Contract to Intel Corporation

klughads
Beginner
357 Views

Hello, thank you for answering. I'm thinking of (according to Intel) the best, correct, and down to the basic simple and safe way to configure a i7-9700K or i9-9900K, to maximize the performance vs thermal limitations of a custom/diy build.

 

According to what I have read in Intel documents, Short/Long Duration Package Power Limit seems to be the way to configure a system according to it's power delivery and cooling capability.

 

Is such a configuration all you need, or should an AVX offset also be configured to (more instantly and quickly?) clock down the CPU to avoid too high temperatures? Especially when overclocking. When OC, I assume that all voltage and frequency handling, speedstep, are set to default/auto.

 

(Background thoughts.... :

 

I think this question is valid to non-overclocked systems as well as overclocked systems, as long as all voltage and frequency handling is set to default, I mean VCore is set to auto and all power handling, speedstep, c-states etc are default/auto.

 

However, this Short/Long Duration Package Power Limit method is not often discussed and used in forums around along users that build their own PCs. People often use AVX offset to handle high temperatures to get the system through a stability test without overheating the CPU. But a stability test is just one case of usage of the PC of millions. For daily usage, OC or not, I think you don't want to limit the performance having the CPU clocking down because of an AVX offset, just for a few AVX instructions now and then. 

 

The latest years, and especially the years to come, there is and will be more cores, running at higher frequencies, requiring more and more power and better cooling systems.

 

There will be more and more diy users that will wonder how to configure and test a system. How handle the heat etc...

 

Many users that build an i9-9900K system today are experiencing thermal problems, or they think they do, and don't know how to handle the situation. They test using AVX heavy utilities like Prime95. Some think a system must be able to run at all core turbo (MCE) with AVX instructions, handling all the heat.

 

During many years it was quite simple, you could put an 4C/8T i7 into every motherboard and the power delivery was most often no problem on OC-motherboards, and a decent air cooler managed to take care of the heat.

 

Motherboards from MSI, ASUS, Asrock etc are often delivered with no power limitations, sometimes configured with multi-core enhancement (all core at the same highest turbo freq).

 

I think that it will be more and more questions about configuring and testing a diy system the years to come.

 

Therefore, I think a simple and back to the basic method i needed. OC or not.

)

David_V_Intel
Employee
357 Views

Hello klughads,

 

Thank you for your response.

 

Each platform's (i.e. motherboard) default BIOS settings are already optimized for proper and optimal Processor usage on all factory supported scenarios including AVX heavy loads.

 

Intel does not comment or provide assistance on modifying platform specific settings. This is something that should be addressed with each motherboard manufacturer as they own BIOS implementation.

 

 

Regards,

David V

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

Under Contract to Intel Corporation

David_V_Intel
Employee
357 Views

Hello klughads,

 

Were you able to check my previous post?

 

Let me know if you need more assistance.

 

 

Regards,

David V

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

Under Contract to Intel Corporation

David_V_Intel
Employee
357 Views

Hello klughads,

 

Please contact us if you have any additional questions.

 

 

Regards,

David V

 

Intel Customer Support Technician

Under Contract to Intel Corporation

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