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Finding an M.2 SSD for the S2600CW2 board. Confused on Edge Connector. I know it can not be NVMe. But the ones listed as SATA don't follow the Edge Connector Keying as I understand it.

MShum5
Beginner
429 Views

So I want to add a M.2 SSD drive to my S2600CW2.

 

I understand it has to be a M.2 SATA and not NVMe or anything else.

 

The only thing is the Edge connectors keying on the board it looks to be a B Keyed Connector.

 

When looking online the SATA's I am finding look to Be B & M Key Edge Connectors. Is this fine I think it is but just trying to be sure.

 

The following on Newegg would fit right?

 

https://www.newegg.com/sandisk-x300-128gb/p/0D9-0006-00071

 

Second I know the screw and riser means the card size is 2280 right? But I noticed the H screw standoff is at the 40-42mm point from the connector but offset from the riser screw. Can this be used for a 2242 size card? This is only for curiosities sake.

 

Thank You

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1 Solution
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
79 Views

Yes, it should be fine. In either Type B or Type M sockets, a SATA drive can gain access to the SATA lane exposed. While it doesn't matter in this case, but trying to give a complete answer, a Type B socket can make two PCIe lanes available for use by an NVMe drive whereas a Type M socket makes four PCIe lanes available. I said 'can make' in the Type B case because it is typical for older boards that offer a connector only to support SATA drives will do so using a Type B connector.

 

Drives can come in 42, 60 and 80 mm lengths, depending upon the amount of board space required to implement the necessary amount of storage. You should have a riser installed at *only* the length of card you are going to use. Risers at any intermediate point could cause a short on the card. If you cannot remove these intermediate risers, place a piece of non-conducting (black electricians) tape on them so that no short can occur.

 

Hope this helps,

...S

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5 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
80 Views

Yes, it should be fine. In either Type B or Type M sockets, a SATA drive can gain access to the SATA lane exposed. While it doesn't matter in this case, but trying to give a complete answer, a Type B socket can make two PCIe lanes available for use by an NVMe drive whereas a Type M socket makes four PCIe lanes available. I said 'can make' in the Type B case because it is typical for older boards that offer a connector only to support SATA drives will do so using a Type B connector.

 

Drives can come in 42, 60 and 80 mm lengths, depending upon the amount of board space required to implement the necessary amount of storage. You should have a riser installed at *only* the length of card you are going to use. Risers at any intermediate point could cause a short on the card. If you cannot remove these intermediate risers, place a piece of non-conducting (black electricians) tape on them so that no short can occur.

 

Hope this helps,

...S

View solution in original post

MShum5
Beginner
79 Views

Thank You.

 

I thought I was on right track Just starting to do some spinner replacements with SSDs and understanding the board mounted SSDs is a little bit to grasp compared to the Drive formfactor SSDD with the normal SATA connections.

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
79 Views

It is important to understand that there is no performance advantage to using a board-mounted M.2 SATA SSD versus a 2.5" SSD connected via SATA cable. The limitation on performance is almost exclusively based upon the maximum SATA (6 Gb/s) throughput. Once you get to a motherboard that offers support for (Type M) M.2 NVMe SSDs, this changes drastically. Whereas SATA typically limits you to something like R/W 550/520 MB/s, M.2 NVMe SSDs with performance at the R/W 3500/3200 MB/s level are already available - and speeds will be increasing again once the PCIe 4.0 rollout is complete.

...S

Emeth_O_Intel
Moderator
79 Views

Hi MShum5,

 

Thank you for contacting Intel Community.

 

I would like to know if the information provided by @Scott helps you to have a better understanding of the information. If you have any other questions, please do not hesitate and let me know and I will be more than happy to assist you.

 

Regards,

 

Emeth O.

Intel Customer Support Technician

Under Contract to Intel Corporation

 

MShum5
Beginner
79 Views

Perfect!

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