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Beginner
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Remote CDT and updating code.

Since the Intel XDK is removing the debug tab, is there a way to update the code in an app as quickly as the Debug tab did it?

As far as I can see, in the future, every time I make a change that needs testing, I have to build and install the app. Can I avoid that?

One has to wonder at this point as well, what is the point of the Intel XDK? Since the pre-loaded text editor is not very good, the remaining debugging tools can't use plugins, and building takes a significant amount of time since I have to upload and download in addition to building, why wouldn't I just use Cordova CLI?

The speed at which I tested changes was the #1 thing I chose the XDK for.

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Valued Contributor I
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I have some doubts like Silviu. We are seeing that more frameworks are deprecated. Only remains Bootstrap.

Are XDK going to deprecate also App Designer?

It will be nice to know XDK roadmap, is it available?

I'm a big fan of XDK, it helped me to learn a lot about developing hybrid movile apps. At this time I feel I can develop without it. But it is a great tool, I hope it is going in the right direction and I would appreciate if we can know something about it.

Thanks a lot to all XDK team.

Regards

Diego

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Silviu I. wrote:

Since the Intel XDK is removing the debug tab, is there a way to update the code in an app as quickly as the Debug tab did it? ...

...Since the pre-loaded text editor is not very good...

...why wouldn't I just use Cordova CLI?

Silviu -- you can debug a built Android app, directly on-device, with full JavaScript and CSS debugging, by way of remote Chrome* DevTools*. Regarding debugging in a built app, the JavaScript console is your best friend. Watch this video (https://software.intel.com/en-us/videos/using-the-test-tab), from ~19:30, for a technique showing how to modify code during your debug session so you do not have to rebuild your app just to try changes in your code.

You have always been able to use whatever editor you like to work on your source files while the XDK is open. That feature has been part of the XDK since the very beginning and continues today.

You can use Cordova CLI to build your apps, as well. We do not try to restrict you from doing so. See this post > https://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/intel-xdk/topic/685326#comment-1885369 < for some help in converting an existing XDK project into a local Cordova CLI project.

Diego Calp wrote:

It will be nice to know XDK roadmap, is it available?

Unfortunately, we are not able to provide roadmaps in public forums, or comment on future plans, it is against company policy.

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Beginner
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you can debug a built Android app, directly on-device, with full JavaScript and CSS debugging, by way of remote Chrome* DevTools*. Regarding debugging in a built app, the JavaScript console is your best friend. Watch this video (https://software.intel.com/en-us/videos/using-the-test-tab), from ~19:30, for a technique showing how to modify code during your debug session so you do not have to rebuild your app just to try changes in your code.

=======================

I try some times start to debug as described in top, but ..... chrome don't see app created by XDK.

What I doing wrong ?

 

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Andrejes -- did you set "debuggable" to "true" in the additions.xml file? That is required. Then review these two pages to confirm you have a usable debug connection:

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Beginner
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The point that I was trying to make is that the I (at least), viewed the Intel XDK as a one-stop-shop app making machine. I love the settings and plugin management, the debug module and the one-click build process. It's convenient and simple to use.

The problem is, I can probably set up the build commands for Cordova CLI in an automated process as well and that would eliminate two of the features, leaving the Debug module... which you are now removing.

I don't think you're moving in the right direction with this, at least as far as I'm concerned.

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Silviu I. wrote:

I don't think you're moving in the right direction with this, at least as far as I'm concerned.

FYI, from the various feature deprecation notices:

This feature is being retired because, as previously announced and noted in the release notes, future editions of the Intel XDK will focus on the development of IoT (Internet of Things) apps and IoT mobile companion apps. Since we introduced the Intel XDK IoT Edition in September of 2014, the need for accessible IoT app development tools has increased dramatically. At the same time, HTML5 mobile app development tools have matured significantly. Given the maturity of the free open-source HTML5 mobile app development tools, we feel you are best served by using those tools directly.

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Beginner
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I'm going to be honest here:

I don't see how the debug module is hindering the development of IoT apps. It seems to me like you're also saying "Yeah, we do want you to use something else instead."

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The Debug tab is not essential for developing IoT mobile companion apps, and requires a tremendous engineering effort to keep it maintained and up-to-date. The existing debug tools provided by Google, Apple and Microsoft are more accurate and always up-to-date (because they own the technologies that go into the debug tools).

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Beginner
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I also want to leave my thoughts about the debug tab deprecation and basically I agree with @Silviu.

We use Intel XDK since more than one year and we choose this platform for two reasons: 1) the all-in-one features from the development to the build 2) the real device debug tool.

Sincerely, in our team we should run fast to design - develop - test - publish and your choice to deprecate the debug tool will obviously slow down the process. Moreover, we're not interest in IoT development (at the moment) and if XDK would be more focused on this topic than the classic app development we're doing, we're forced to make a survey for XDK alternatives in the near future.

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