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RAlfj
Beginner
1,343 Views

DC P3700 makes my computer reboot over and over (NVMe driver issue?)

I got this SSD as a replacement for my old Intel 910 series that failed.

Problem: As soon as the SSD is placed in an available PCIe slot my computer starts an endless loop of rebooting. The LED on the SSD goes from yellow to green and the fans starts spinning, then a second later next reboot.

I get no BIOS screen, no nothing so I'm completely in the dark. I read something about an requierment being UEFI version 2.3.1 but there is no way to get this information from my motherboard (MSI Z77MA-G45 with the latest BIOS version) so I can't confirm nor dismiss this being the issue.

Even unplugged some other hardware to make sure the SSD got enough power with no improvement of the situation...

Any ideas?

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18 Replies
jbenavides
Honored Contributor II
172 Views

Hello beaverhausen,

The Intel® SSD DC P3700 and the Intel® SSD 910 Series are very different. The P3700's are PCIe NVMe 3.0 x4 devices, and they have different system requirements, which are mentioned in page 5 of the http://downloadmirror.intel.com/23929/eng/Intel%20SSD%20Data%20Center%20Family%20for%20PCIe%20Instal... Intel® Solid-State Drive DC P3700, P3600 and P3500 Series Installation Guide.

Based on the information you have provided, the continuous reboots appear to be caused by a compatibility issue. In our best effort, we would like to provide the following recommendations:

- Try connecting the SSD to one of the 2 x PCIe 3.0 x16 slots (try both and check if the SSD works in either one).

- Test the system using a single Memory DIMM.

If the issue persists, try contacting http://www.msi.com/support MSI Support, so they can confirm if the P3700 was validated with this motherboard.

Please take into consideration that the Intel® SSD DC P3700 is designed to be used with current generation server motherboards, so no testing with desktop motherboards was done on Intel side. In this situation, the motherboard vendor is responsible to test and validate compatibility, so we would recommend you to contact MSI.

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

Hello and thanks for the quick response.

Removing all but one memory module worked but that leaves me with only 4Gb of RAM. That's not gonna work... I have 4x4Gb Kingston HyperX DDR3 1600MHz (KHX1600C9D3X2K2/8GX).

Will I have to replace my current RAM? With what in that case?

EDIT: Using 2 memory modules also works (have not yet tested any more than that) BUT at EVERY start up BIOS tells me "CPU OR MEMORY CHANGED. PRESS F1 TO ENTER BIOS OR F2 TO LOAD DEFAULTS AND CONTINUE". Well there is nothing to change in BIOS so no matter how many times I've saved the current config I get the same thing over and over again at start up.

PHans4
Novice
172 Views

You can take a look at this thread, if you have a POST card you can see if the same issue applies to you... https://communities.intel.com/message/308996# 308996 https://communities.intel.com/message/308996

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

Thanks for replying. Looking into that thread and I've also contacted MSI about possible driver incompatibility.

Excuse the silly question but was does a POST card mean?

PHans4
Novice
172 Views

A POST card is a diagnostic card that can display Port80H messages if they are sent over the PCI bus.

Search eBay for: "POST PCIe" for example and you will find several.

Do note that as best they are Mini-PCIe meaning you would need a PCIe > Mini PCIe passive adapter to use such a card with your mainboard...

Oh wait, while writing I found this one, for full size PCIe

http://www.ebay.com/itm/PC-Analysis-Diagnostic-Motherboard-POST-Tester-Card-Computer-PCI-Express-/27... PC Analysis Diagnostic Motherboard Post Tester Card Computer PCI Express | eBay

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

Ok so MSI told me that the NVMe drivers are not supported by my motherboard. I can use the SSD with 1 or 2 memory DIMMs with the catch that I have to load BIOS defaults upon every boot.

With my PC booting BIOS gives me an message that my cpu or memory changed and promt me to enter bios to change my setting or to load bios default. No matter what I do in bios I get the same boot-time message upon every boot.

Is there any solution to this or will I have to return the SSD?

CChon3
New Contributor I
172 Views

You will have to paste a non-electrical sticker over one pin to work around this issue.

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

Hello and thanks for your reply. I've read that other thread more thorough and applied this non-official fix.

It works like a charm! Thank you so much! Attaching is an screenshot when I benchmarked all my SSDs.

C: An Intel 520 series, 120Gb

D: SAMSUNG Evo 850 500Gb

G: Intel DC P3700 400Gb

The differences are insane really! Too bad I can't use the P3700 as system drive... One question thou. In the other thread you state that this workaround is to prevent the SSD from "overwriting the SMBus SPD". What does that actually means and will that have any effect in the long run? I mean the implementation must be there for a reason?

EDIT: I've gotten several BSOD since installing the SSD with the workaround... Any thought about that? :S

EDIT 2: Ok, my PC starts but I cannot copy large chunks of data to the new SSD without getting constant BSODs... Any ideas?

CChon3
New Contributor I
172 Views

Your motherboard should be able to use the card as a system drive.

Read this on how to do that:

The speed/timing data of your DIMMs is located somewhere, when the card is plugged into a desktop motherboard, the card overwrites the speed/timing data of DIMM slot B2 with it's own vital product data. This makes the motherboard BIOS confused when it tries to set the DIMM speed on the memory controller based on the speed/timing values that is overwritten by the SSD which is completely invalid for memory.

Do you have a screenshot of the BSOD?

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

I'll check into that thread assuming the blue screens stop. The BSODs are only visible for like ½ second then instant reboot so no print screen there. All I can tell is that I see some kind of memory reference before the screen turns black.

 

Thanks for explaining the other fix btw. Much appreciated

EDIT: Just googled were and how to find crash information in windows. I'll research some more on that topic as soon as I have time and try to extract relevant information in those logs for you.

PHans4
Novice
172 Views

Control Panel > System > Advanced System Settings > Startup and Recovery

Untick the option "Automatically restart"

Then wait for it to crash again

Upload the dump files from C:\Windows\Minidump that are related to the crashes you experienced (check time/date) so they can be analyzed.

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

Didn't figure out how to open or edit the dumpfile but there shouldn't be much other crap there at all. My computer had only run for a few minutes when the bsod occurred.

When it first happened I tried to do a disk check which failed as it "got interrupted"...

Dumpfile

https://www.dropbox.com/s/xx9sx64uyctkfh5/091715-7612-01.dmp?dl=0 Dropbox - 091715-7612-01.dmp

 

 

BSOD

PHans4
Novice
172 Views

The crash is caused either by a driver writing to the wrong address or due to faulty memory.

Have you verified the memory by running http://www.memtest.org/# downiso Memtest86+ on the machine?

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

Memtest passed with no errors. I've never had any memory faults on this computer... Ever, until this SSD came into the picture.

We already know that the MSI NVMe drivers are not compatible with the SSD so I guess it's not to far fetched to assume that it's these drivers causing the trouble?

EDIT: Just found out that the "Intel SSD Data Center Tool" doesn't find my device at all. Like it doesn't exist even thou the SSD is fully visible in explorer. Still unable to perform any kind of hd error checking as well...

PHans4
Novice
172 Views

MSI does not provide any NVMe drivers, what driver are you using now? I see from the memory dump you are on Win7, so I'm assuming you are using the Intel NVMe driver: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/23929/Intel-Solid-State-Drive-Data-Center-Family-for-PCIe-... 1.2.0.1002-x64

If so you could try the Microsoft NVMe driver instead, you will need to install hotfix https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2990941 KB2990941 and might as well get https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3087873 KB3087873 too even if I don't think it's related to your issue.

After this is done and your system has rebooted go to:

Device Manager > Storage Controllers > Intel NVM Express Controller > Driver > Update Driver > Browse my computer for driver software > Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer

At this stage if things worked out as I hope they have you should see both the Intel driver and the Microsoft Standard NVM Express Controller, select the latter for install.

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

You made an correct assumption

The other driver changed one thing... I can perform an basic disk check in windows but other than that, more bsod after a few seconds of copying data to the drive.

jbenavides
Honored Contributor II
172 Views

Hello,

This is to remind you that desktop boards with chipsets from previous generations may not be compatible with PCIe NVMe drives. NVMe is a new host controller interface for Non-Volatile Memory storage. So if the system is not compatible, it may display abnormal behavior, including memory issues.

In your case, this was confirmed with the response obtained from MSI, also, the fact that the system works with the Intel® SSD DC P3700 only if it is using a single memory DIMM, and the actions you had to do in the BIOS everytime you attempted to boot.

Also, I would like to add that Intel does not endorse / support the use of fixes that include taping or blocking PCIe connections.

RAlfj
Beginner
172 Views

And that's the end of that I guess... Now Intel just gonna have to replace my previous failed hd with one I can actually use

Thanks everyone for your time and support! *over and out*