Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
idata
Community Manager
2,063 Views

Intel Gen2 RST trim support + 144gb/128gb partitioned for performance increase

http://cafe.naver.com/intelssd.cafe

The link above is for semi-official intel ssd online community in Korea, it is managed by a korean worker in Intel Company Korea.

This guy had a meeting with an engineer from Intel USA.

during the presentation, he saw that a table confirming that

when 160Gb G2 is partioned as 160gb/144gb/128gb for usable space and leaving the rest unpartitioned,

there was performance gain in 4k: 15/42/53, I personally assume that this is for 4k read.

and the engineer also mentioned that RST 9.6 or above supports trim.

I will update this thread once i confirm on these things with him.

0 Kudos
14 Replies
DZand
Valued Contributor I
124 Views

2. @ vavabavava:

Thanks for your informations regarding the influence of different partition procedures on the performance of Intel 160 GB Postville SSD's.

I cannot confirm these findings.

Here are the benchmark results with my Win7 x64 system (Intel 160 GB Postville SSD connected to an Intel ICH10R SATA AHCI Controller running Intel RST driver v9.5.7.1002):

1. SSD 100% partitioned (no free = unpartitioned space available):

2. SSD 80% partitioned (32 GB free = unpartitioned space available):

Regards

Fernando

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

I think he was talking about endurance.

Acording to the bellow pdf, endurance is the total amount of random host data which can be writen within the life of the drive.

X-25M with a:

160GB capacity has 15TB of random write lifetime (370TB sequencial write lifetime)

144GB capacity has 42TB of random write lifetime (370TB sequencial write lifetime)

128GB capacity has 53TB of random write lifetime (370TB sequencial write lifetime)

Monitoring write usage and endurance:

Read about it here:

http://maltiel-consulting.com/Enterprise_Data_Integrity_Increasing_Endurance.pdf http://maltiel-consulting.com/Enterprise_Data_Integrity_Increasing_Endurance.pdf

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

My X-25M G2 160GB (4,5 months old)

Host Writes (E1): 2,27TB

Media Wearout indicator (E9): 0

Maybe I'll increase it's endurance...

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

I have a new 160gb g2 drive. Increasing endurance for random writes to 42tb vs 15tb sounds nice.

The linked pdf explains the benefits well (PAGE 11 from document):

- Native 160GB capacity reduced by 16 GB

- 42 TB endurance capability - increases from 15 TB to 27 TB - 2.8x improvement

Great. I assume while using this drive as a boot drive, this trick will make it last a lot longer (2.8x unless sequential writes wears it out first)...

So the final question is exactly how to do it properly.

PAGE 10 of the document states:

Adjust Intel SSD spare area by limiting drive capacity

- ATA8-ACS Host Protected Area feature set is used (SET MAX ADDRESS)

- Use ATA8-ACS SECURITY ERASE UNIT prior to limiting capacity

- Setting partition to smaller size after erase is an option (less robust)

I know how to set the partition size smaller but what steps are needed for the ATA8-ACS features to be implemented.

I'm assuming there's a program one uses to secure erase the drive but what does "SET MAX ADDRESS" mean??

Sharing any knowledge of how to do this and any links to necessary programs would be extremely helpful.

Thanks.

P.S. Looking forward to TRIM supported 9.6.x drivers as well. Hopefully this means TRIM support with an Intel SSD single drive and a hard drive RAID on the same Intel controller set to RAID mode.

I assume Raided SSDs will still lack trim support - which I don't need ... yet.

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

Raidman wrote:

So the final question is exactly how to do it properly.

I know how to set the partition size smaller but what steps are needed for the ATA8-ACS features to be implemented.

I'm assuming there's a program one uses to secure erase the drive but what does "SET MAX ADDRESS" mean??

Sharing any knowledge of how to do this and any links to necessary programs would be extremely helpful.

Same questions here...

We could secure erase and make a smaller partiton, but maybe it's better to use the protected area and set a max address...

How to do it properly ?

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

Acording to this post (read it for important information):

http://forum.notebookreview.com/showpost.php?s=a71146ad9e0db356957be8010ef435b4&p=5355762&postcount=... http://forum.notebookreview.com/showpost.php?s=a71146ad9e0db356957be8010ef435b4&p=5355762&postcount=...

This program can SET MAX ADDRESS and change the drive size:

http://www.hdat2.com/ http://www.hdat2.com/

Note: I never tried it before.

Wikipedia entry about the "host protected area" explains how it works, and makes reference to HDAT2 and other tools:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Host_Protected_Area http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Host_Protected_Area

This looks like those old DOS Hard Disk tools were you could set the HD maxsize if your bios didn't recognized it, don't know if it's the same ATA command.

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

Mr. Wolf:

Unless you're running some sort of server-class workload, you don't need to partition for more endurance.

Your usage model:

2.27 TB / 135 days = 17.2 GB / day

The spec is 20GB / day for the lifetime of the product, which provides plenty of guardband to when the Nand actually wears out.

To put things in perspective, assuming all writes were sequential and ignoring "write amplication":

2.27 TB / 160GB = 14.5 "cycles" to the Nand in 4.5 months

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

^ Can you give any insights into perfromance gains by reducing the partition size?

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

Those are two very big assumptions. Writes are likely to be random small files and consequently write amplification is an issue. What is the erase count on the G2's? 5K?

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

NandFlashGuy:

If a X25-M G2 160GB SSD has a 5 year lifetime with a 20GB/day worksation workload.

Is it correct to assume a X25-M G2 80GB SSD has a 2,5 year lifetime with the same 20GB/day worksation workload ?

The 160GB SSD has 15TB of random write lifetime and 370TB sequencial write lifetime (from the endurance presentation).

The same 160GB SSD has 5 year lifetime with a 20GB/day workstation workload (from it's specs).

5 year at 20 GB/day is 5*365*20 = 36500 GB = 35 TB lifetime

Is it correct to assume (for the 160GB X25-M) if I set max size to 144GB capacity (42TB of random write lifetime, 2,8*15TB=48TB), I'll increase the 160GB SSD lifetime to:

2,8*5 = 14 years lifetime at 20GB/day

2,8*35TB = 98 TB lifetime

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

@Mr Wolf:

Intel's datasheet says both the 80GB and the 160GB have a 5-year, 20GB per day spec. This conflicts with the basic idea that the 160GB drive has twice the Nand, hence you should be able to write it roughly twice as fast or twice as long. You can assume that Intel is sandbagging on the 160GB specs.

The difference in random write and sequential write numbers that you cite from the presentation is a reflection of the internal write amplication under different usage conditions. A "real" consumer workload is a mix of random and sequential writes, so that's why the datasheet spec is beween the "ideal" values for sequential and random.

The "lifetime" benefits you will see from changing capacity is a function of your usage model. Hence, I don't think you can accurately predict the write amplication vs space capacity without in depth knowledge of the workload and the firmware. But for a typical consumer usage model (ie. not a server), the write amplication is already quite low, so there will be neglible endurance benefits from reducing your capacity.

 

Keep in mind the presentation was written with enterprise endurance in mind, where the write amplication can be much higher than normal.
idata
Community Manager
124 Views

Thanks for the advice, I agree with your arguments.

My workstation profile is bellow the 20GB day (5 year lifetime spec), plus I have a 160GB drive with probably twice that lifetime.

idata
Community Manager
124 Views

And here is my result comparing to your first picture except I am using the standard msahci driver:

Reply