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idata
Community Manager
1,984 Views

The detection of SSD in Windows 7

Many people including myself have reported their SSD not being detected as an SSD in Windows 7. After installing Windows 7, defrag should be turned off by Windows 7, and some other services as well according to Microsoft blog. The method by which Windows 7 is supposed to detect an SSD is by zero rotation of the disk. This issue may or may not be related to 32 or 64 bit Windows 7, or perhaps to the version of Windows 7, such as Home Premium, Ultimate, or Professional. I am using Home Premium 64 bit Windows 7. Here is an excerpt from an article stating how Windows 7 is supposed to detect an SSD:

Windows 7 will set Defrag off as a default, when detecting non-rotating media, improving device endurance by reducing writes. 

http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-Windows-7-Evolution-to-NAND-Flash-Solid-State-Disks-SSDs-98097.sh... http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-Windows-7-Evolution-to-NAND-Flash-Solid-State-Disks-SSDs-98097.sh...

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6 Replies
idata
Community Manager
90 Views

You need to check your information before you post. It does not detect rotation, it tests random read speeds. (It is also supposed to recognize SSDs that declare themselves properly) However, both these are obviously buggy.

Try this article first:

http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/05/05/support-and-q-a-for-solid-state-drives-and.aspx http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/05/05/support-and-q-a-for-solid-state-drives-and.aspx

idata
Community Manager
90 Views

You need to quote the exact wording that states how it detects an SSD--as I did above along with the source. The testing of random reads and writes is to determine what services should be disabled--which has nothing to do with defrag being turned on or off.For example, Intel G1 SSD will not have certain services turned off because it will likely fail certain tests.

Windows 7 will set Defrag off as a default when detecting non-rotating media, improving device endurance by reducing writes.

Source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-Windows-7-Evolution-to-NAND-Flash-Solid-State-Disks-SSDs-98097.sh... http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-Windows-7-Evolution-to-NAND-Flash-Solid-State-Disks-SSDs-98097.sh...

idata
Community Manager
90 Views

I installed my SSD with win 7 ultimate 64 bit and i believe defrag was scheduling was set but my system ssd drive stated, "never run"...

is there another way to check to make sure windows saw my SSD correctly?????

idata
Community Manager
90 Views

ambizytl wrote:

You need to quote the exact wording that states how it detects an SSD--as I did above along with the source. The testing of random reads and writes is to determine what services should be disabled--which has nothing to do with defrag being turned on or off.For example, Intel G1 SSD will not have certain services turned off because it will likely fail certain tests.

Windows 7 will set Defrag off as a default when detecting non-rotating media, improving device endurance by reducing writes.

Source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-Windows-7-Evolution-to-NAND-Flash-Solid-State-Disks-SSDs-98097.sh... http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-Windows-7-Evolution-to-NAND-Flash-Solid-State-Disks-SSDs-98097.sh...

You are still wrong. Here is one quote:

"Will disk defragmentation be disabled by default on SSDs?

Yes. The automatic scheduling of defragmentation will exclude partitions on devices that declare themselves as SSDs. Additionally, if the system disk has random read performance characteristics above the threshold of 8 MB/sec, then it too will be excluded. The threshold was determined by internal analysis."

Just get your info direct from Microsoft as in this quote and you will be on the right track.

idata
Community Manager
90 Views

Just wanted to add the rest of that answer from Microsoft, for those that are interested in why they chose random reads:

Will disk defragmentation be disabled by default on SSDs?

Yes. The automatic scheduling of defragmentation will exclude partitions on devices that declare themselves as SSDs. Additionally, if the system disk has random read performance characteristics above the threshold of 8 MB/sec, then it too will be excluded. The threshold was determined by internal analysis.

The random read threshold test was added to the final product to address the fact that few SSDs on the market today properly identify themselves as SSDs. 8 MB/sec is a relatively conservative rate. While none of our tested HDDs could approach 8 MB/sec, all of our tested SSDs exceeded that threshold. SSD performance ranged between 11 MB/sec and 130 MB/sec. Of the 182 HDDs tested, only 6 configurations managed to exceed 2 MB/sec on our random read test. The other 176 ranged between 0.8 MB/sec and 1.6 MB/sec.

idata
Community Manager
90 Views

The answer from Microsoft blogger does not state in exact terms how the SSD is detected. The wording I quoted from that article gives precise and straight-to-the-point answer. Look at where that answer came from by clicking on the link. I believe that was at a convention and was Seagate telling what Microsoft said was how SSD is detected.

I am wrong? I did not write that article, and your quote does not state specifically how SSD is detected.

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