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idata
Community Manager
2,016 Views

X25m 80GB READ is slow

Hi,

I´ve a problem with my new SSD - the drive is up to date with the new 02HD Firmware, but my Read is too slow. Some hints for me.

Here is my system http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01635688&cc=us&lc=en&dlc=en

thanks in advance

AS SSD Benchmark 1.4.3645.3568

 

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Name: INTEL SS DSA2M080G2GC SATA Disk Device

 

Firmware: 2CV1

 

Controller: amdsata

 

Offset: 1024 K - OK

 

Größe: 74,53 GB

 

Datum: 28.01.2010 21:08:57

 

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Sequentiell:

 

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Lesen: 154,30 MB/s

 

Schreiben: 78,52 MB/s

 

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4K:

 

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Lesen: 6,80 MB/s

 

Schreiben: 8,21 MB/s

 

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4K-64Threads:

 

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Lesen: 78,31 MB/s

 

Schreiben: 48,47 MB/s

 

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Zugriffszeiten:

 

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Lesen: 0,289 ms

 

Schreiben: 0,443 ms

 

------------------------------

 

Score:

 

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Lesen: 101

 

Schreiben: 65

 

Gesamt: 215

 

------------------------------
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34 Replies
MBall5
New Contributor II
233 Views

Hello, if you believe that your Solid State Drive is not working properly or reading in a good speed I will suggest installing the operating system in the AHCI option in the BIOS, here is why:

AHCI is a hardware mechanism that allows software to communicate with SATA drives. To make that transaction smoother, SATA devices were initially designed to handle legacy ATA commands so they could look and act like PATA devices. That is why many motherboards have "legacy" or IDE modes for SATA devices – in that case users are not required to provide additional drivers during OS installation. However, Windows 7 ships with AHCI drivers built in, so soon this mode will no longer be necessary.

But this begs the question: what features does AHCI mode enable? The answer isn't simple, but one of the bigger advantages is NCQ, or native command queuing.

NCQ is a technology that allows hard drives to internally optimize the order of the commands they receive in order to increase their performance. In an SSD everything is different. There is no need to optimize the command queue, but the result of enabling NCQ is the same – there is a performance increase. In brief, NCQ in an Intel SSD enables concurrency in the drive so that up to 32 commands can be executed in parallel.

Also take into consideration that the speed of the processor and the RAM also the amount of it will affect the performance of the Solid State Drive.

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

I have the same problem. I used to love my X-25M, now I'm thinking I have to rip it out and put in a conventional spinning platter as this Intel product is.... not nice. My system used to boot in seconds and now it's as slow as a hard drive PC.

I ran AS SSD and you can see the results here: http://tinypic.com/r/2s6szgw/7

That's not a typo, this INTEL SSD is SLOW, 2-5 MB per second for writing

This is a gen 1 device so no, the toolbox won't run TRIM on it.

I have it running on AHCI already, always has been.

I checked and I have the most recent firmware.

It's been in service about a year, that's less than the lifespan Intel advertised but it seems like others are having the same problem too.

Can anything be done to recover speed on the Gen 1 devices? I can't run TRIM, is there anything else that can clean up the blocks?

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

Hmm, I was wrong, I DON'T have AHCI enabled. I enabled it in Windows 7 then went and turned it on in BIOS and the system complained that it didn't have bootable media.

Can Gen 1 do AHCI? Is it advised?

Do I need to put my Gen 1 device physically on the first SATA cable to make it boot in AHCI?

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

Thank you redux. Forgive me for not making that clear - yes, I did that.

By your answering does it mean you have a Gen 1 successfully running in AHCI? On which SATA line? Any other hard drives in there?

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

G1 drives will work in AHCI mode. It should not matter which SATA port you use. Does your G1 have the latest firmware? If not, you defiantly need to update it. If it does have the latest firmware I would suggest a secure erase, which will bring performance back to new. (Unfortunately Intel chose to not provide TRIM support for G1 drives)

To secure erase you can use hdderase.

http://cmrr.ucsd.edu http://cmrr.ucsd.edu may need to switch back to IDE mode if the drive cannot be detected. You will lose all data when you secure erase. If you make an image of the drive before you secure erase you can reinstall it afterwards and you will be good to go. If you have Win 7 you can make an image from the backup and restore panel. (Takes around 10 minutes to back up and 10 minutes to restore).

There is loads of helpful info hidden away here:

http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/support/highlights/ssdc/x25m-80gb

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

I do have the most recent firmware as well, thanks.

I've been doing research on this and it seems complicated by the fact my OS is on the SSD. It seems like the proper approach will be:

1) Create system image to a different hard drive (can I do this with another HD, puttingthe whole SSD on DVDs seems daunting)

2) Secure-erase the SSD

3) Boot from Windows installation DVD

4) Go to "Repair your computer" and select some (unnamed option) that will presumably let me point it at the HD I've put the system image on?

Will a system image also capture the fragmentation?

Is there an authoritative discussion of this somewhere? I've been through http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/support/highlights/ssdc/x25m-80gb that everyone is citing but can't find mention of this procedure except in forum posts (some of which are horror stories).

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

Here is a tutorial on how to make a system image with Windows 7

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Back-up-your-programs-system-settings-and-files http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Back-up-your-programs-system-settings-and-files

SSD does not fragment like a hard drive so when you restore the system image (after you have secure erased the drive) you should be back to top performance.

To restore the system image:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Restore-your-computer-from-a-system-image-backup

EDIT:

By the way Intel provides a free Data Migration Software that will do the same job but I don't know if it will work with G1 drives.

http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?agr=Y&ProdId=3114&DwnldID=19324&ProductFamily=Solid... http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?agr=Y&ProdId=3114&DwnldID=19324&ProductFamily=Solid...

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

Well, I decided today was the day to try it and there sure are more challenges than any of the online instructions describe:

Creating system image : DONE

Get HDDErase v3.3 (not 4.0): DONE

My challenge comes in running HDDErase v3.3-

1) I have found clean DOS boot ISOs and made a boot disk - no use, it won't recognize my hard drives even when I set the BIOS to IDE and "compatible" to handle legacy OSs, thus I can't get to a hard drive to run the HDDErase program

2) I have found DOS boot ISO with HDDErase 4.0 already on it - no use, I need HDDErase 3.3

3) I can boot to a Windows recovery disk and run DOS and access HDDErase but it replies that it can't run under a 64-bit environment.

All the instructions I've found seem to assume you either have a floppy drive that you can put DOS and HDDErase on and boot from -or- that I can boot from USB (which my nice high end ASUS motherboard cannot do )

So, one solution would be if someone could tell me how to add HDDErase to this nice clean DOS iso... Or how to get to a 32-bit DOS from here...

any other ideas?

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

HDDErase 4.0 will work just the same as 3.3. Boot straight from the disk, don't try and do it from Windows. Looking at your AS SSD benchmark it shows me you are using a PCI IDE Controller, which could well be the problem. What mobo do you have? Does it have any other controllers on board? (Look for different coloured SATA ports or refer to the mobo manual). If you can switch over to another controller try running HDDErase 4.0 on it. If not try removing any other devices and try again. If you are still stuck do you have access to another PC that you could try it on?

One thing to be careful of. You must use the same hardware settings that were in place when you made the system image when you go to reinstall it.

I have an ASUS board and it can boot from USB by the way. AFAIK all newer ASUS boards can, but you need to make the USB bootable 1st.

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

Thanks redux, you're being very helpful and I appreciate your time.

Much as I hate to bring it up both the center for magnetic recording research (the originators of the tool) and no less than PC Perspectives say that 4.0 won't work to "fix" the G1: http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=669&type=expert&pid=6 http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=669&type=expert&pid=6

So I think I need a way to boot and somehow get to the 3.3 version.

As for my mobo, it's an AUA P6T deluxe version 2: http://www.asus.com/product.aspx?P_ID=iRlP8RG9han6saZx&templete=2 http://www.asus.com/product.aspx?P_ID=iRlP8RG9han6saZx&templete=2

I built the system myself and plugged all the drives into the main first SATA ports on the motherboard, but I'll dig into the manual and take another look.

EDIT: LOL, what is up with ASUS, they require me to install software to download a manual! (their direct link download server is broken, at least for this model). All the manual versions online are the wrong size and from sites proclaiming loudly how safe they are but which are flagged by McCaffee. This is turning into a multiple day project, just trying to fix the damn Intel faulty-as-shipped drive. Good lord.

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

The first Intel firmware version would only work with 3.3 but the later Intel firmware versions allowed 4.0 to work. That is why you are seeing conflicting information. SSD technology moves quite fast so I can see why you are finding conflicting information.

(I hope I'm right. I haven't used G1 drives for some time now but I'm sure V4.0 worked on later firmware versions)

You need to get off that controller if you can. Hopefully you have an Intel chipset. If so just make sure you are using the Intel SATA port.

EDIT:

I was right. The latest firmware version 8820 allows HDDErase 4.0 to run.

"The 8820 firmware allows the commands, meaning there is no longer an incompatibility with HDDErase 4."

http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=691&type=expert&pid= http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=691&type=expert&pid=

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

OK good news. You have an Intel chipset with an ICH10 controller. The other controller is Marvel.

If you are using the Intel controller in AHCI mode you should be seeing this from the device manager. (I'm using ICH9 so you will see ICH10)

If you are running the RST driver you should see this if you open AS SSD benchmark.

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

redux, you tha man!

I had discovered that motherboard info and chipset as well. Verified physically that I'm on the right SATA plug. No idea why it said pciide before.

I changed everything over to AHCI, so now AS SSD reports "msahci"

- NO CHANGE IN PERFORMANCE, WRITE IS STILL SUB- 4MB/sec

Now I need to research this RST driver you've mentioned. At first google it looks like it's big advantage is passing along TRIM commands, which of course won't help someone who foolishly bought Intel's version 1! ... More reading suggests that it's only for RAID folks. So I guess I'm stuck until I can secure erase the thing.

As for USB boot, the ASUS manual says nothing and the web is conflicted. I went old-school and dug a 3.5" floppy drive out of my parts box, sigh , but Windows 7 won't recognize it.

Sounds like I need to download the ridiculously oversized ISO with HDDerase 4 built in next.

EDIT: Doh! The big ISO has HDDerase v3.1 on it. Guess I need to figure out the USB boot thing.

Also: Anyone who winds up here while looking for an ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 manual - don't bother with the ASUS site, it'll install bizarre chinese P2P software on your machine that won't uninstall, then fails to find the file. The only site I found with the manual was the top TURKISH return on the google search : http://www.cizgi.com.tr/resource/vfiles/cizgi/pms_file/57/p6tdeluxev2_en.pdf http://www.cizgi.com.tr/resource/vfiles/cizgi/pms_file/57/p6tdeluxev2_en.pdf

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

Intel recommends using the RST 9.6 driver as it optimises performance and endurance. http://download.intel.com/support/ssdc/hpssd/sb/newusersguide.pdf http://download.intel.com/support/ssdc/hpssd/sb/newusersguide.pdf

That is not however going to solve your problem. You need to secure erase the drive.

Making a bootable USB saves dealing with floppy drives and burning disks. It's a bit tricky to set it up but it's worth it in the long run. Here is a tutorial on how to do it.

http://www.bay-wolf.com/usbmemstick.htm http://www.bay-wolf.com/usbmemstick.htm

Once you have created it you need to extract the HDDErase files on to the USB drive. As you boot up keep hitting F8 and ASUS gives you a boot priority option. Select the USB drive. If you follow the above you will see a Windows 98 boot screen. Navigate to the command prompt, select the USB drive and type hdderase.exe and then follow the instructions.

If you can't make a bootable USB just burn a bootable disk. (The more straight forward option).

Once you have erased the drive performance will be back to factory condition. Due to the problems you have mentioned with the controller I'm going to suggest that you do a fresh installation rather than reinstall the image. If you do this I'd suggest that you F6 the RST 9.6 driver during set up.

On a fresh install make sure you are in AHCI mode before you start and that the drive is plugged into an Intel SATA port.

I appreciate this is all sounds complicated, but once you have sussed it out its quite easy and painless.

Good luck!

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

Darkgreen said: "All the instructions I've found seem to assume you either have a floppy drive that you can put DOS and HDDErase on and boot from -or- that I can boot from USB (which my nice high end ASUS motherboard cannot do )"

Darkgreen,

All modern Asus boards can boot from USB thumbdrives/harddrives etc - including all P6T variants.

Look at the BOOT section of the BIOS. Their is a "Boot Device Priority" setting which basically lets you choose whether the Floppy/DVD/or Hard Drive is the first thing that boots. But then you also have to set the "Hard Disk Drives" Setting which says WHICH hard drive is set as the boot drive. A much easier method for Asus motherboards it to just tap F8 when first booting and the memory is being initialized. Just before Windows starts loading, a Boot Menu will come up and allow one to boot from any device connected to the motherboard. (If one hits F8 right after Windows starts loading, the Windows Safe Mode Menu will show up which is different.) This page has a bunch of ways of making a bootable USB thumbdrive: http://www.bootdisk.com/pendrive.htm http://www.bootdisk.com/pendrive.htm Good Luck!
RGiff
Honored Contributor I
233 Views

There only a few USB floppy drives that will work with windows 7 , I have one that does work , thats how I installed my RAID drivers. I do not have it here to tell you the name , But you can go to the windows site and search for compayable hardware.

RGiff
Honored Contributor I
233 Views

Found it it is BYTECC , BT-144 and it works.

idata
Community Manager
233 Views

Thanks everybody for the advice. Unfortunately while I can get my P6T to boot from USB (supposedly) and eventually I managed to get a USB stick to take a good DOS format (turns out not all can) I have yet to achieve the holy trinity of HDDErase (late version) / USB DOS boot that recognizes drives / SSD.

As a consultant I normally bill by the hour and this project has consumed enough time that I should have just bought a new computer 3 times and I'd be ahead. I've been pushing forward as it always seems like I'm just an hour from completion, but the rabbit hole goes deeper and deeper and there is no "sure" way to fix it.

I've also had plenty of time to consider that Intel sold us a "high performance drive" at high price that doesn't even perform as well as a cheap platter hard drive that costs 1/6th as much, they know it, and they won't even post software to help fix it. I can understand their fear of liability for admitting things and/or offering up software than might destroy data, but it's still a horrible way to treat customers.

Nowadays even moving a file from one directory to another causes a lengthy pause as windows tries to get the SSD to respond.

So - Change of focus:

1) What NON-INTEL SSD should I purchase to replace this with? I intend to copy the disk image over and just replace it.

2) What (legal, nonviolent) creative thing should I do to dispose of my effectively useless INTEL XM-25 that will have the maximum possibility of getting some blog writeups and press attention? Tape it to the window of a Best Buy with a note written in soap? Mail it back to INTEL with a "ransom note" ? Ideas welcome. Those who don't have one probably can't appreciate it but these first generation devices (that I paid about $350 for) are really less useful than a floppy disk drive, the delays are THAT long.

idata
Community Manager
30 Views

I'm a happy guy now.

I did some research and purchased a:

Corsair 120 GB Force Series Ultra Fast TRIM Supported Solid State Drive CSSD-F120GB2-BRKT

http://tinyurl.com/28jyrwm http://tinyurl.com/28jyrwm

to replace my intel drive and WOW, SSD can be very fast!

After monkeying around with booting to obsolete alternate OSes and trying to find a way to get the non-intel erase tool in the right version onto that DOS disk and to interact with the intel drive (which it never did) the switch to the Corsair took less than 20 minutes! It is awesomely fast and totally the right choice to just eliminate the intel drive.

I still have this damned intel drive I spent all that money on. At some point maybe I'll try to convince it to behave as a secondary but for now it's so slow it might as well be a 3.5" floppy drive so I don't use it for anything. Amazing that intel would let their early adopters just rot with nothing to show for their money. The stock research organization I work for has advised two clients to sell INTC stock now, hah! Sorry guys but a psuedo monopoly on processors will only get you so far, you still need happy customers to expand.

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