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idata
Community Manager
5,337 Views

" Intel has a task team in place " Why don't they join us?

It's been a week since the problems began and basically no word from Intel. This is really a lame response to a major problem.

Why doesn't someone from the "task team", who are supposedly working on this issue, join this forum? Start a thread, let us know what's going on and, most importantly, seek some feedback. There are alot of smart folks on this forum, and maybe if you let us know whats going on and ask some questions, you might get some helpful answers.

Or, are you just too big and important that it would be too low for you to stoop?

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35 Replies
PCoup1
New Contributor I
104 Views

well said.

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

Thats a good question

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

Support team can not comment because they don't have information, manufacturing or developing team just don't read this forum or can not comment it (housekeeping information).

The left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing and there is the problem.

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

Undoubtedly there's a lot of internal organizational pressure on the Intel SSD team to fix this problem. And, undoubtedly the team is qualified for the task at hand.

Given those two facts, I think it's safe to assume that the Intel engineers are working hard to fix the problem. In fact, given the wide-spread nature, visibility & severity of this problem, I bet that there's a lot of extra hours into the late night being put in.)

Although I personally know of no such cases, I'd expect that if they need data from drives in the field, they've already contacted some of us privately and are now able to reproduce the problem sufficiently for their needs.

I've been in their shoes and in my opinion, the engineers are behaving entirely appropriately. Don't forget that this is a huge, huge, publicly-traded company. That means that there are layers and layers of marketing, legal, management, and bureaucracy scrutinizing them at their end.

As much as we all are anxious to hear the status of their work, it's generally not considered good business practice (for a variety of reasons, mostly valid!) for engineering groups to post progress reports and detailed discussions.

Ironically, I remain glad I purchased my SSD from Intel. We can be sure that Intel has the skills, resources, and desire to fix this problem ASAP. And, frankly, that can't be said for many other vendors in this marketplace.

PCoup1
New Contributor I
104 Views

What a load of waffle.

After all is said and done, it would not take much for someone from whichever department is appropriate to do a bit of PR on their own forum.

We don't doubt for one minute that Intel aren't working on this full throttle but giving people a bit of reassurance or even an indication, if known of time scales involved would be a wise move.

Being cold shouldered by a generic statement just leaves the rumor mill to take over and in the long run, as we've seen here, starts to get peoples backs up.

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

Personally I do not really care about detailed discussons, progress reports or anything but one simple question:

Should I RMA my SSD, which takes like 8-10 weeks, or will it be fixed by another firmware/tool? 8-10 weeks is a very long time.

And that piece of information should get released as soon as possible, I guess that is what most people really want to know about, furthermore I do not see any damage Intel could recieve by doing this.

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

tfield98 wrote:

Undoubtedly there's a lot of internal organizational pressure on the Intel SSD team to fix this problem. And, undoubtedly the team is qualified for the task at hand.

I sure hope so, and trust it is so, but we don't have any evidence of it, do we? On the contrary, if you are a tad cinical, the utter silence and long time this is taking would make you think that they are not giving it high priority.

 

tfield98 wrote:

Given those two facts, I think it's safe to assume that the Intel engineers are working hard to fix the problem. In fact, given the wide-spread nature, visibility & severity of this problem, I bet that there's a lot of extra hours into the late night being put in.)

Since we don't have any evidence, I would certainly not call them facts!

 

tfield98 wrote:

As much as we all are anxious to hear the status of their work, it's generally not considered good business practice (for a variety of reasons, mostly valid!) for engineering groups to post progress reports and detailed discussions.

 

I fully disagree with you there! It is generally not good business practice to ignore requests for information from your customers or to communicate without being exact. If you are afraid your engineering groups would communicate something they shouldn't, run it by your PR department first, but don't hold the info back!
idata
Community Manager
104 Views

Undoubtedly there's a lot of internal organizational pressure on the Intel SSD team to fix this problem. And, undoubtedly the team is qualified for the task at hand.

If it is the same team as the one that was responsible for the firmware update, then I wouldn't be so sure.

As much as we all are anxious to hear the status of their work, it's generally not considered good business practice (for a variety of reasons, mostly valid!) for engineering groups to post progress reports and detailed discussions

 

I don't need or expect to know what the value of a certain memory register was. However, some general information, such as: Have you narrowed it down to a particular operating system? or, "We're looking at the time of day in combo with the alignment of the planets", etc.

But, saying nothing for over a week is just bad business.

By the way, there are quite a few manufacturers that monitor and reply to the user comments and ratings about their products, on Newegg.com. I kinda like that.

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

I just thought I'd throw this in here. My drive was bricked, I phoned the support number and was speaking to a live person within 5 minutes, and paid $25 to have a drive cross-shipped air mail, which arrived 2 days after the phone call. Still the old firmware, and I'm still waiting to hear what is going to happen with a new firmware, but I have a brand new drive running and it only cost $25. I don't know about this 8-10 week RMA...

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

I just thought I'd throw this in here. My drive was bricked, I phoned the support number and was speaking to a live person within 5 minutes, and paid $25 to have a drive cross-shipped air mail, which arrived 2 days after the phone call. Still the old firmware, and I'm still waiting to hear what is going to happen with a new firmware, but I have a brand new drive running and it only cost $25. I don't know about this 8-10 week RMA...

I did the same thing. It only cost me $25 to get a brand new drive (bought the day before) replaced with a brand new drive. Now thats a bargain!

I have no issues with the support phone call or the RMA process. However, this is one issue that Intel is clearly responsible for. They should have bitten the bullet and covered the $25 themselves. There are alot of people sitting on the fence waiting for some direction from the giant.

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

retiredfields wrote:

I just thought I'd throw this in here. My drive was bricked, I phoned the support number and was speaking to a live person within 5 minutes, and paid $25 to have a drive cross-shipped air mail, which arrived 2 days after the phone call. Still the old firmware, and I'm still waiting to hear what is going to happen with a new firmware, but I have a brand new drive running and it only cost $25. I don't know about this 8-10 week RMA...

I did the same thing. It only cost me $25 to get a brand new drive (bought the day before) replaced with a brand new drive. Now thats a bargain!

I have no issues with the support phone call or the RMA process. However, this is one issue that Intel is clearly responsible for. They should have bitten the bullet and covered the $25 themselves. There are alot of people sitting on the fence waiting for some direction from the giant.

That's awesome if you are in the US, if you're not though you'll find you can't really do that. Not all the world has a supply of replacement spares ready to send out like this.

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

I'm not in the U.S., actually. I'm in Fort McMurray, AB, Canada... and shipping here, especially airmail, is not cheap. I would imagine that Intel lost money on shipping it to me.

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

I heard that this is the second time Intel had an issue with the firmware. How long did it take Intel to fix the first firmware problem?

idata
Community Manager
104 Views

I think from April to August... not sure, but I think that was the reason the G2 drives weren't shipping for so long.

Also, I spoke with the Intel tech support rep about the firmware and the BIOS password issue. I used HDDerase 3.3 to blank my drive, but I unwittingly used the enhanced secure erase option, which apparently sets a password on the drive (thus bricking it). However, I could get it to work a little after that, and the support rep said that if the firmware could update, then the new firmware was supposed to fix this issue as well and all would be good. The firmware update worked, but the drive didn't, at least not for long. Maybe this 'fix' might be at the root of the problem, and not just enabling TRIM

idata
Community Manager
8 Views

mikellini wrote:

I just thought I'd throw this in here. My drive was bricked, I phoned the support number and was speaking to a live person within 5 minutes, and paid $25 to have a drive cross-shipped air mail, which arrived 2 days after the phone call. Still the old firmware, and I'm still waiting to hear what is going to happen with a new firmware, but I have a brand new drive running and it only cost $25. I don't know about this 8-10 week RMA..

I did the same actually, I dialed the support number and spoke to some really friendly dude and can only repeat what I was told. Chance is he did not know himself. The difference to you is, I live in Germany.

I don't know what you mean by "cross shipping" (well, my english sucks as I'm no native speaker), but if you mean that you and Intel sent their packages simoultanously I can only envy you, since I don't have that option or atleast it was not offered to me. It is pretty common for an RMA-request to take about 8 weeks over here.

If cross-shipping is what I guess it is, than I will call them again tomorrow, that is f'ing awesome if they do that.

idata
Community Manager
8 Views

I appreciate the responses regarding calling phone support. But this is my point exactly, why do we have to pay $25 to get a new drive shipped when it was INTEL's fault for the bricked SSD's in the first place? Also why do they have email support when no one responds to them? I have a hard time believing that a company as big as Intel lacks the resources to have a responsive support center. Intel is one of the biggest technology companies, yet they have a hard time responding to emails?!?

idata
Community Manager
8 Views

Well, to be fair, I didn't HAVE to pay $25, I could have gotten them to email me a shipping label, print it out, ship my old drive, wait for them to get it and process it, and then they would have sent me a new one. I chose to pay the extra for cross-ship because it was quicker...

Actually the way their cross-ship works is, you pay the $25, then they send the new drive to you, and once you get the new drive, you put the old drive in the same box and ship it back with the included UPS label. The only catch is they hold some money on your credit card until they receive the old drive; I think it was only $180, and they took the hold off 5 days after I shipped it back to them.

P.S. The cross-shipping wasn't offered to me either, I had to ask about it, and then they transferred me to the cross-ship department.

idata
Community Manager
8 Views

Intel did update their announcement (at the top) yesterday:

"We have been contacted by users with SSD issues after using the firmware upgrade tool (version 1.3) in a Windows 7* 64bit environment. Intel has replicated the issue on 34nm SSDs (X25-M) and is working on a fix. If users have downloaded 02HA firmware and not upgraded, Intel recommends they don't upgrade until further notice. Intel is pursuing the resolution of this as a high priority. No related issues have been reported by users who have successfully upgraded to 02HA firmware via the firmware upgrade tool (version 1.3)."

idata
Community Manager
8 Views

So this is a win 7/64 problem? If so why are the drives being replaced? If it is a compatibility problem with the new firmware why not issue a down grade firmware to fix the problem and save having to do an rma?

Also I am currently experiencing problems that developed after a successful firmware update. My OS freezes, I get the BSOD and the drives "disappear." I have to clear the bios swap over the sata ports and the drive then reappears until it eventually (within 2 hours) crashes again.

I could switch to win 7/32 if that would be an interim solution, but is it? Someone please tell me. If I wipe the drives with hdderase and install win 7/32 will I be ok? I'' I'm quite happy to do this as an interim measure but I don't want to waste any more time on a futile exercise.

idata
Community Manager
8 Views

Hear hear! Seems our complaints in this thread helped a bit! But I dont understand the new statement:

"We have been contacted by users with SSD issues after using the firmware upgrade tool (version 1.3) in a Windows 7* 64bit environment.

 

.. AND...

 

No related issues have been reported by users who have successfully upgraded to 02HA firmware via the firmware upgrade tool (version 1.3)."

What are they saying here? The only way to upgrade your SSD firmware is via the "firmware upgrade tool" which runs via a boot cd. So the upgrade is never done in a "Windows 7* 64 bit environment" but in the environment that is on the boot cd. And then they say that "no related issues have been reported...". Do they mean that if your upgrade went ok, you are safe and the drive won't fail at a later stage? Or do they mean that you are safe if you don't use Windows 7 64bit?

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