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Beginner
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Good Installation of Parallel Studio XE

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Hi,

I tried to install Parallel Studio XE student version for Linux.  I have openSUSE 13.2 64bit x86.   Unfortunately, during my installation sequence, the installer warned me that my OS and CPU is not supported.  Nevertheless, I proceeded with installation.   It went without problems.  Unfortunately, I could not see fortran being listed in menu or any fortran icon.  I tried to compile fortran file from terminal window by typing ifortran file.f90 but it could not find fortran compiler.  I guess I was warned beforehand.   Then I decided to uninstall it and it went without a problem.  You've got a good and intelligent installer.  I wonder if I could fix the support problem or did I miss steps in trying to run ifortran.?  If not, will I be able to download again but windows version?

Thanks.

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See if http://software.intel

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See if http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-compilers-for-linux-and-mac-os-x-compiler-installation-help helps.

You can request a student license for the Windows product. Note that you will need to separately obtain Microsoft Visual Studio (VS2015 Community Edition will work, but make sure that you select a custom install and check the box for C++ language support.)

Retired 12/31/2016

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See if http://software.intel

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See if http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-compilers-for-linux-and-mac-os-x-compiler-installation-help helps.

You can request a student license for the Windows product. Note that you will need to separately obtain Microsoft Visual Studio (VS2015 Community Edition will work, but make sure that you select a custom install and check the box for C++ language support.)

Retired 12/31/2016

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Black Belt
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You probably had a workable

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You probably had a workable installation of Parallel Studio before you uninstalled it. I have used Parallel Studio on several versions of openSuse with no problems at all. You need a working GCC tool-chain installed before installing Parllel Studio.

After installing Parallel Studio, you need to open a terminal window to start a shell session. As described in the Parallel Studio installation guide, you need to source the startup script in order to configure the environment.

If you want a menu entry or icon, you have to create one yourself.

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Beginner
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To Steve Lionel and mecej4:

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To Steve Lionel and mecej4:

Thanks for reply. I reinstalled again regardless of warnings for lack of support for my OS.  I read your suggestion and tips.  I successfully managed to test run hello.f90 and my SpeedTest.f90 files.   My speed test code told me that your fortran compiler is 'whooping' fast.  I was testing how fast it took for my code to calculate basic math functions (x^2, x-x etc) under 10M loops.   It was a flash.  Looks like 10M is not enough.  Thanks for you support.   Both of you gave me the best answer to be fair but I marked Steve because Steve was first.
 

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Make sure that the compiler

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Make sure that the compiler didn't optimize away all the work because it realized the result was never used. I see this a lot in casual benchmarks.

Retired 12/31/2016
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Beginner
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How do I ensure that?  By

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How do I ensure that?  By flagging the compiler, if yes then how? By rewriting the test code?  I think the compiler optimizes away all the work because my benchmark is simple.  For example,  it does calculation of a sin(x) 10M times in a loop and prints the results after the loop.  The answer variable is the same for each loop.  Therefore I assume that it does only once.

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Artificial benchmarks of this

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Artificial benchmarks of this nature are usually a waste of effort, especially those that repeat an identical calculation. Compilers are quite clever at eliminating unnecessary work.

You could enable optimization reports to look for remarks of removed code, though that's not always indicated. Examining the assembly code is always instructive. But your time is better spent testing performance of your actual application. You could also look at established benchmarks run under controlled circumstances. For comparing Fortran compilers, the Polyhedron Solutions comparisons are invaluable.

Retired 12/31/2016
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