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OneAPI

JohnNichols
Valued Contributor II
621 Views

I am a bit lost.  I was part of the ONEAPI beta program.  But now I appear to be able to download a version without a serial number. Is there a free version? Or am I missing something? 

I stumped thru a lot of web pages, but this allows me download

https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/tools/oneapi/base-toolkit.html 

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1 Solution
mecej4
Black Belt
614 Views

You no longer need a license file or serial number to download and install the OneAPI kits. Users who wish to purchase priority support can do so.

What is not clear is how the procedure for filing bug reports is going to be changed.

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10 Replies
mecej4
Black Belt
615 Views

You no longer need a license file or serial number to download and install the OneAPI kits. Users who wish to purchase priority support can do so.

What is not clear is how the procedure for filing bug reports is going to be changed.

View solution in original post

JohnNichols
Valued Contributor II
605 Views

Any idea why they changed the price model - this is a big change, but it will broaden the appeal - do you think this is reason - 

mecej4
Black Belt
579 Views

I do not know, nor do I know the extent of the demand for a compiler that can generate code for CPUs and coprocessors (MIC, FPGA, but not CUDA?). 

You may like to read Steve L's post about the new compiler on the Fortran Language Discourse Group forum.

JohnNichols
Valued Contributor II
546 Views

 Steve's comment :: "Intel doesn’t sell systems directly (not counting things like NUCs, which I adore)"

NUCs are without a doubt the best computer for money you can buy. I have lost count of the number that I have around the world.  But they are almost indestructible and easy to use.  I can put three NUC's in a backpack and fly anywhere.  

That is also the problem with economics, it is not what it is worth, it is what someone will pay or the price you will not part with an item.  Nothing else matters really.

Fortran is still the best language after Lisp. 

Steve_Lionel
Black Belt Retired Employee
538 Views

As I wrote in the post @mecej4 linked to, hardware vendors don't try to make money from software - the software exists to make the hardware worth buying. This is sometimes difficult for financial types to wrap their heads around - they look at everything in terms of profit and loss. With Intel, it's even more complicated as the compilers are the output of multiple teams often in different organizational trees and different spans of responsibility. 

Charging for support is becoming a rapidly accepted business model. and I think it's great that Intel is moving to it. One barrier to making everything free is that many businesses think less of free things (if it were worth something, they'd charge for it, is the thinking.) Charging for support is a way around that.

As for NUCs, I just replaced a large tower system (Core i7 3700K) that is my main PC with a 10th gen i7 NUC. I got a NUC for my mom, for my wife, and I use one with my 3D printer. They're great - and I especially like that Intel keeps updating firmware for them even after they're many years old. 

JohnNichols
Valued Contributor II
521 Views

A NUC is easy to take anywhere and it is never hard to borrow a monitor.  

Although it is amazing that a Raspberry Pi is almost as fast as a CORE i3, I can certainly run the software for the monitoring on both and not stretch them. The only problem is Linux does not play nice with multiple Ethernet cables plugged into one device.  And the NUC is much better quality. 

oneAPI Fortran installation says finalization takes 5 minutes but it closer to an hour. 

plus with a program like ZOHO assist it is easy to log onto any machine remotely anywhere in the world, so installing fortran programs remotely is easy. 

Barbara_P_Intel
Moderator
478 Views

Bug reports!  If you are using the FREE version of oneAPI components, support is via the appropriate Community Forum.  There is more information in this FAQ, Commercial Products Support FAQ

We will file bugs for you, if you choose to not pay for support.

 

JohnNichols
Valued Contributor II
472 Views

It is not a matter of not wanting to pay for support, as an academic our research funds can often be measured in the hundreds of dollars. Some years my biggest software expenditure was the 200 for the academic Intel compiler. 

I looked at the cost for support for an academic is about 3800 per annum - if I got all the boxes correct

I prefer to spend my limited funds on more NUCs. 

Ryan44
Beginner
276 Views

Can someone provide me with a URL to download the FOSS oneAPI Base Toolkit, the 2019 version?  I specifically need the 2019 version because it is compatible with RedHat 7.

Steve_Lionel
Black Belt Retired Employee
261 Views

There is no 2019 oneAPI version. There was a Parallel Studio XE 2019, and for a while Intel was offering free, one year licenses for open source contributors, but that has been discontinued since the oneAPI versions are free for everyone.

If you purchase a support license, you can get access to some older versions for download. There isn't a URL you can get the old version from (and it would still need a license key.)

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