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ASoli6
Beginner
1,447 Views

Core I5 9600K with variable frequency values (from 800mhz up to 4500 mhz). How to reset default frequency?

Hi, I've a Core I5 9600K on a MSI Z390 Gaming Plus motherboard. I've variable frequency values (from 800mhz up to 4500 mhz). Also with Intel Processor Identification Utility I've "Expected Processor Frequency: 3,70 GHz, Reported Processor Frequency: 4,29 GHz". The frequency of all six cores is in continuos changing. Until a few days ago I had 3,70 ghz with no changing. I've installed Intel Extreme Utility but I've made no modifications. After this installation core frequency has become unstable.

I've done a bios reset, a clean installation of Windows 10 with no results.

How can I restore default settings for my cpu? I think I've running some overclock option but I dont' know how to stop it.

Thanks

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7 Replies
n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
666 Views

I hate to say it, but this variable frequency is actually the normal state. Running constantly at 3.7 GHz is not normal. This indicates that Intel Turbo Boost (which would allow higher frequencies) and Intel Speedstep (which would force lower frequencies when system is idle) are being disabled/overridden. I believe you can configure the BIOS for High Performance operation and configure Windows to use the High Performance profile. That should lock it down like you had it previously..

ASoli6
Beginner
666 Views

First of all thanks for your reply. Do you think is normal frequency going over 3,7 ghz? I thought that being variable is a normal way to work for a cpu, but going over 3,7 ghz isn't an overclock state? With software "aida64 extreme" it report "overclock" every time the frequency goes over 3,7 ghz... Furthermore, I'm not 100% sure, but I think a few day ago, without any modification made, the frequency doesn't go over 3,7 ghz. Also temperatures of cpu was a litte lower.

What do you mean with "high perfomance profile" in bios or Windows? Almost everything is set to "auto". It's possible that installation of Extreme Tuning Utility, without any modification mad by me, has modificated anyway something? Soyy but I would like to be sure to have a "normal" and not overclocked cpu...

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
666 Views

Yes, this is completely normal. If there is thermal headroom (etc.) to do so, the Intel Turbo Boost feature will take the clock of an individual core (or set of cores, depending upon current workload) and advance it to a higher frequency. This gives the processor a boost of accelerated operation. While it is true that this could technically be considered a form of overclocking, it is one that does not result in the processor being asked to do anything it shouldn't. You should peruse the entry for Intel Turbo Boost in Wikipedia; it will give you a good introduction to the feature, how it works and when it works.

 

In the BIOS Settings, you should find a place where you can select either High Performance Mode, which prevents the power management feature from lowering processor clocks when the system is relatively idle, or Balanced Mode, which allows the core clocks to be lowered (and power saved) when the system is relatively idle. Typically, if you select Auto, you default to Balanced Mode. Windows similarly has a place where you can select to use a High Performance, Power Savings or Balanced power plan. To access this, go into Windows Settings, browse into System settings and then Power & Sleep, and then click on the Additional Power Settings button on the right-hand side of the window. The resulting Power Options applet is used to specify the power plan to be used. By default, I believe that the Windows power plan chosen by default will follow the BIOS setting in operation when Windows is installed. I specify Balanced in both places to balance performance with power consumption.

 

Hope it helps,

...S

ASoli6
Beginner
666 Views

Thank you again! I forgot to mention that this "up and down" of frequency (from 800 to more than 4500 mhz) occurs in EVERY condition, also when the pc is without any task requirede (except system normal tasks). No Windows update downloading/installing, no browsers opened, no applications running in background. After a clean installation of Win 10, at the first boot (with no installations made excetp the ones made by Windows itself) the sitution was the same I've described. Is this normal?

Furthermore I've tried to "overclock" the sistem in the bios, moving the option "cpu ratio" from "auto" to "37". Now the frequency agoes maximum to 3700 mhz. Doing a stress test using a software, the cpu goes up to 4700 mhz, so I think Turbo Boost it's not disabled (bios option shows "auto") and used only when it's necessary? I don't know if in this situation the cpu works with its best performance or not

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
666 Views

That's not abnormal. You would be amazed how many maintenance tasks Windows has running in the background.

S​ounds to me like nothing is wrong. Again, I invite you to read about these features if you want to understand what is going on.

...S

ASoli6
Beginner
666 Views

Yes, I've read about Turbo Boost and it seems to works as I knew.

 

From Intel website:

 

"Intel® Turbo Boost Technology 2.01 accelerates processor and graphics performance for peak loads, automatically allowing processor cores to run faster than the rated operating frequency"

 

...

 

"the amount of time the processor spends in that state depends on the workload and operating environment"

 

Now...when can we consider a "peak load"? When I launch an heavy application? Or when I launch an application that requires an high amount of resources? I think yes, and if I see an high frequency this is a normal situation.

 

But can we consider a "peak load" the normal and daily tasks made by windows without any user request? If this is true in fact the cpu works almost ever at turbo boost mode and there isn't a situation when it works in "normal" (no turbo) mode for more than 1 second.

 

What do you think about my consideration? Is there something that I dont' understand?

 

Sorry for my insistence, I'm only tring to undestand...

 

Thanks in advance

n_scott_pearson
Super User Retired Employee
666 Views

By "workload", they are talking *any* active execution threads. These can be foreground or background threads. How the boosting will take place depends upon a whole slew of factors. First is thermal load. How many cores can be boosted - and for how long these cores can be boosted - depends highly on this factor. Second is the nature of the workload. If, for example, there are only one or two threads that are active, it might require that only one core needs to be boosted. Third is number of cores that need to be boosted (yes, this seems odd; bear with me). The amount that each core can be boosted - and for how long - is (typically) of diminishing return. For example, if one core is required, it can be boosted to the maximum supported clock speed. If two cores are required, then they (typically) can be boosted to lesser levels. As more cores are necessary, it (typically) diminishes more. I say 'typically' because the boost levels by core count can be adjusted in the BIOS Configuration in many board designs. Some folks change the defaults to ask for the clock rate to go/stay higher - and this will indeed be attempted, but once thermal start to rise, the length of the boost will be curtailed. Finally, there are other factors that come into play, but I am not going waste any more of my time expanding upon them here (see the documentation for more information)

 

Yes, it should be obvious that the processor is attempting to boost core performance all of the time. Yes, this is going to managed based upon established time slots. Is this one second intervals? I am unsure without looking it up myself (see the documentation).

 

I understand that you are trying to sort out how this all works, but you need to understand that my time is important as well. I have committed too much time to this discussion already (there are, for example, 32 posts that may be awaiting a response and I won't know until I get to them). You should now be able to study the available documentation for whatever nitty-gritty details you need on your own.

...S

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